Yucatan Mexico crab - dipnet/pot/trap

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Overview

The blue swimming crab fishery in the Yucatan is an artisanal fishery where crab are caught mainly by hand.  Fishers use a hand net and scoop crab up while standing in small boats called cayucos.

Pontchartrain Blue Crab (based in Louisiana, USA) and its Yucatan suppliers launched a fishery improvement project in April 2013. A preliminary assessment was undertaken to assess the sustainability of the fishery against the Marine Stewardship Council Standard in July 2013 and suggested the fishery would score in the 60-80 range.  The two lowest scores (<60) were for bycatch monitoring and information (PI 2.2.3) and for monitoring the performance of the management system (PI 3.2.5).  These two areas are the highest priorities for fishery improvements.  A landings registry for monthly reporting of crab catches by size and sex began in October/November 2013.  A preliminary assessment against the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch criteria in 2015 found more information was needed on bycatch.  Bycatch monitoring began in February 2015.  The fishery is selective with very little bycatch. Crab traps are a minor component of the Yucatan crab fishery (less than 10%), the vast majority of crabs are primarily harvested with fishermen fabricated ring nets. Ring nets rarely have bycatch. When an occasional fish or hermit crab is captured they are of no commercial value and are immediately returned to the water.

Pontchartrain Blue Crab is the fiscal sponsor for this project. See Pontchartrain Blue Crab's commitment to high-quality seafood products here.  The Yucatan company processing crab is Pescados y Mariscos Del Caribe.  Mayaland Seafood packs the Mexican crab meat under private label for Pontchartrain Blue Crab. Pontchartrain and its Yucatan suppliers made a commitment to launch a fishery improvement project in April 2013.  INAPESCA the fisheries agency became involved in 2014.

The blue swimming crab fishery in the Yucatan is an artisanal fishery where crab are caught mainly by hand.  Fishers use a hand net and scoop crab up while standing in small boats called cayucos.

FIP Objective(s) 

The project will improve the fishery to meet or exceed the global standard for sustainable fisheries of the Marine Stewardship Council program by the end of 2020.

FIP Type 
Basic
FIP Stage 
Stage 3: FIP Implementation
Start and Projected End Dates
March, 2013
December, 2020
Species 
Common Name 
Blue Swimming Crab
Scientific Name 
Callinectes sapidus
Gear Type 
Dipnet
Pot/Trap
Location
FAO Major Fishing Area
Area 31 ( Atlantic, Western Central)
Exclusive Economic Zones
Country 
Mexico
Volume
FIP Volume 
60 metric tons

How is this FIP Doing?

FisheryProgress.org uses 28 industry-standard indicators based on the Marine Stewardship Council Fisheries Standard to track FIP progress. This shows a snapshot of the FIP’s current performance against the indicators using the following scale: Red=below 60, Yellow=60-79, Green=80 or higher, Gray=data not available to score the fishery.
64% 36%
Basic FIPs may focus their workplans on a subset of the indicators. This shows the proportion of total indicators the FIP is working on.
100%
This shows the proportion of actions in the workplan that the FIP has completed.
40%  
This shows the proportion of actions that are behind schedule, on track,completed, or not yet started.
Behind On Track Complete Future
0% 60% 40% 0%
FIP Progress Rating 
E - Negligible Progress

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Pontchartrain Blue Crab
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Gary Bauer