Mexico Puerto Peñasco & Puerto Lobos swimming crab - pot/trap

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Overview

The blue swimming crab (Callinectes bellicosus) fishery from the Puerto Peñasco – Puerto Lobos coastal corridor (Sonora, Mexico; 399 boats and 207 official fishing permits) produces on average 1.2 thousand tons/year, with metallic mesh Chesapeake traps (typically 90 traps/boat).

In its present condition and according to the Marine Stewardship Council Standard, 48 percent of the performance indicators for the fishery are “GREEN” (stock rebuilding capacity; information and monitoring for management; stock assessment; ETP species; habitat information and management; ecosystem information and outcome; legal framework; and consultation, roles and responsibilities). 36 percent of its indicators are “YELLOW” because: i) stock assessment should yet recognize extractions from illegal fishing effort (as big as the legal effort at the present) and mortality induced by industrial shrimp trawling; ii) fisheries ordination opportunities and fisheries refuges must be operative for reducing present mortality levels by 10 percent; iii) the management plan must recognize stock reference points; iv) responsible fishing operations and low bycatch rates must be endorsed by onboard observers; vi) impacts of biomass removals of snail, sand bass and triggerfish as bycatch of the swimming crab fishery must be dimensioned; vii) ghost fishing related to lost and abandoned crab traps must be assessed and eliminated. 16 percent of the fishery indicators are “RED” because: i) the fishery management plan lacks management objectives, population reference points, action plan, as well as agreed evaluation mechanisms and decision-making processes; ii) surveillance programs deterring poaching are missing.

During the first year, CEDO will implement a technical work plan for improving the commercial fishing operations of S.C.P.P. Ejidal Bahía San Jorge. CEDO and the Rillito Park Heirloom Farmers Market will collaborate prospecting and addressing additional funding for the FIP development. The core group will communicate and promote improvements to the official management plan among INAPESCA, CONAPESCA, and other local and regional organized fishers.

The technical work plan consists of: i) the operation of a season-round (2019-2020) and community-based fishery monitoring program; ii) the operation of onboard and land-based swimming crab fishery bycatch monitoring programs; iii) the undertaking of catch efficiency and selectivity trials with different baits; iv) the mitigation of ghost fishing by derelict swimming crab traps; v) the undertaking of cost-benefit assessments for the use of degradable clips in the construction of swimming crab traps; vi) the design and implementation of a wastes management and re-use plan for the swimming crab fishery; vii) the undertaking of biologic monitoring and detailed physical characterization of potential fishery refuges and viii) the continuous promotion of the FIP among INAPESCA, CONAPESCA and other local and regional organized fishers. Catch traceability options for the fishery will be additionally prospected. This work plan aims for the improvement of all 13 fishery performance indicators scored as yellow and red and implies the direct investment of USD $79,946 during the first year.

FIP Description 

The blue swimming crab (Callinectes bellicosus) fishery from the Puerto Peñasco – Puerto Lobos coastal corridor (Sonora, Mexico; 399 boats and 207 official fishing permits) produces on average 1.2 thousand tons/year, with metallic mesh Ch

FIP Objective(s) 
  • Generate updated information useful for improving recent and local swimming crab stock assessments by March 2022.
  • Update the bycatch characterization of the local swimming crab fishery by March 2021.
  • Assess catch efficiency and selectivity with different baits (season-round and endorsed and validated by the national fisheries authority) by March 2021.
  • Dimension and characterize ghost fishing caused by derelict swimming crab traps and other fishing gears at the main fishing areas by March 2021.
  • Assess advantages (constructions costs, catch efficiency, bycatch rates and operative easiness) of using degradable clips in the construction of swimming crab traps by March 2021.
  • Dimension and characterize the generation of solid and liquid wastes by the fishery by March 2021.
  • Monitor (according to a specific National Official Standard) the effectiveness of fishery refuges for the restoration of local stocks, by March 2022.
  • Analyze and interpret a five-year series of ecosystem health indicator species data and achieve a sixth year of data by March 2021.
  • Promote the utility of the FIP among fisheries authorities and other local and regional organized fishers and trigger the improvement of the fishery management plan by March 2022.
FIP Type 
Basic
FIP Stage 
Stage 3: FIP Implementation
Start and Projected End Dates
April 2019
April 2022
Next Progress Report Due 
Saturday, October 31, 2020
Species 
Common Name 
Blue Swimming Crab
Scientific Name 
Callinectes bellicosus
Gear Type 
Pot/Trap
Location
FAO Major Fishing Area
Area 77 (Pacific, Eastern Central)
Exclusive Economic Zones
Country 
Mexico
Geographic Scope 
Northern Gulf of California
Landings
Estimated Total FIP Landings 
840 metric tons
Estimated Total Fishery Landings 
1,200 metric tons
Landings Date 
March 2019
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FIP at a Glance

7% 39% 43% 11%
April 01, 2019
14% 32% 43% 11%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Oct 2020
Target End Date
Apr 2022
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Intercultural Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans (CEDO)
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Nelida Barajas
Email 
Phone 
+51 638 382 0113
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.