Ecuador mahi-mahi - longline

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Overview

Ecuador’s mahi mahi fishery is one of its most ecologically and economically valuable artisanal fisheries. Ecuador is the second largest producer of mahi mahi in the Eastern Pacific Ocean region after Peru, with average annual landings of 10,139 mt (average 2009-2019). The fishery supports 25,000 fishers and 95% of exports go to the U.S. Since 2010, WWF has worked closely with the Ecuadorian government and mahi mahi exporters on a comprehensive FIP to move the fishery towards the MSC standard. Over that time, more than 10,000 fishers have been engaged in FIP efforts through training on fishing regulations and best fishing practices, adopting bycatch reduction tools, welcoming on-board observers, and piloting a digital traceability system to test electronic logbooks and cameras on-board their vessels.  In February 2019, the fishery entered the MSC full assessment process but unfortunately had to withdraw in December 2020 due mainly to the lack of joint management between Peru and Ecuador of the shared mahi mahi stock.  

FIP's previous workplan actions had all been completed before moving into MSC full assessment but a new workplan has been developed to continue to work on improving the fishery's deficiencies. Conservation Mahi Mahi, a consortium of leading Ecuadorian mahi mahi exporters, signed a new MOU with WWF Ecuador in April 2021 to work together to reinitiate the implementation of the comprehensive mahi mahi FIP.

Approx.  60% of the longline mahi-mahi vessels of the Ecuadorian fleet are now part of this FIP. 

 

FIP Description 

Ecuador’s mahi mahi fishery is one of its most ecologically and economically valuable artisanal fisheries.

FIP Objective(s) 

The objective of the Ecuador mahi-mahi FIP is to move the fishery in a step-wise approach towards meeting the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) standard by December 2023, with the goal of entering the full assessment process after that to achieve MSC certification.

FIP Type 
Comprehensive
FIP Stage 
Stage 5: Improvements on the Water
Start and Projected End Dates
January 2010
December 2023
Update 
The projected end date for the FIP has been extended to December 2023, as the fishery withdrew from MSC full assessment in order to address the remaining environmental challenges in the fishery. The FIP's administration has changed as well, and it is now being led by Conservation Mahi Mahi, a consortium of leading Ecuadorian mahi mahi exporters made up of the following companies: Propemar, Frigolab San Mateo, Transmarina, Fresh Fish del Ecuador, and Frigolandia. WWF Ecuador will provide technical support. A new workplan has been developed which includes new actions and expected timelines needed to continue to work on improving the fishery's deficiencies.
Next Progress Report Due 
Wednesday, March 30, 2022
Species 
Common Name 
Mahi-mahi
Scientific Name
Coryphaena hippurus
Gear Type 
Longline
Location
FAO Major Fishing Area
Area 87 (Pacific, Southeast)
Exclusive Economic Zones
Country 
Ecuador
Geographic Scope 
Throughout Ecuador's EEZ and international waters, but most of the vessels are concentrated in the country's northern ports, in the regions of Manabí and Esmeraldas
Country Flag of Vessel 
Ecuador
Regional Fisheries Management Organization
IATTC
High Seas Name 
Pacific Ocean
Landings
Estimated Total FIP Landings 
6,000 metric tons
Estimated Total Fishery Landings 
15,000 metric tons
Landings Date 
December 2020
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FIP at a Glance

54% 46%
January 01, 2010
25% 39% 32% 4%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Mar 2022
Target End Date
Dec 2023
Additional Impacts:
Roundtable

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
WWF
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Pablo Guerrero
Organization Name 
Independent Consultant
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
GUILLERMO MORÁN V.
Phone 
+593984814782
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
90