Area 61 (Pacific, Northwest)

Overview

The fishery being assessed is the Pacific LongLine Tuna Fishery (Fue Shin Fishery) . The fishery targets albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and catches bigeye (T. obesus) and yellowfin (T. albacares). The pelagic longline vessels are flagged to Taiwan and fish on the high seas in the Pacific. The fishery is managed regionally by the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) and by the Inter American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (EPO).

The fishery being assessed is the Pacific LongLine Tuna Fishery (Fue Shin Fishery) . The fishery targets albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and catches bigeye (T. obesus) and yellowfin (T. albacares). The pelagic longline vessels are flagged to Taiwan and fish on the high seas in the Pacific. The fishery is managed regionally by the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) and by the Inter American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (EPO).

FIP at a Glance

7% 29% 64%
April 01, 2020
7% 29% 64%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Oct 2020
Target End Date
Apr 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Key Traceability
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Hao Mai
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

The fishery being assessed is the StarKist Pacific Ocean longline tuna fishery. The fishery targets albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and catches bigeye (T. obesus) and yellowfin (T. albacares). The pelagic longline vessels are flagged to Taiwan, China, Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), Vanuatu, Cook Islands, Fiji, American Samoa, French Polynesia and Panama and fish on the high seas (and occasionally in the national Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs)) in the Pacific. The fishery is managed regionally by the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) and by the Inter American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (EPO).

The fishery being assessed is the StarKist Pacific Ocean longline tuna fishery. The fishery targets albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and catches bigeye (T. obesus) and yellowfin (T. albacares). The pelagic longline vessels are flagged to Taiwan, China, Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), Vanuatu, Cook Islands, Fiji, American Samoa, French Polynesia and Panama and fish on the high seas (and occasionally in the national Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs)) in the Pacific.

FIP at a Glance

11% 39% 50%
March 01, 2020
11% 39% 50%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2020
Target End Date
Mar 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Key Traceability Ltd.
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Tom Evans
Organization Name 
StarKist
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Matt Hall
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

The unique topography, tidal currents and water temperatures in the marine areas of Hiroshima Prefecture make it an ideal location for oyster farming and fishing. The region accounts for two thirds of Japan’s oyster production, or 20,000 tonnes annually, some of which supplies the Japanese Consumers' Co-operative Union (JCCU), Japan’s largest consumer organization comprised of 29 million members. Since the oyster fisheries’ establishment in 1962, those involved in the oyster fisheries have always focused on quality and safety, but oyster companies now also want to ensure their oysters are produced and seen as eco-friendly.

The Hiroshima Pacific Oyster FIP will work to ensure environmental sustainability of participating FIP companies. Towards this goal, the FIP fishing companies worked with Seafood Legacy and Ocean Outcomes in 2019 to assess their environmental impacts on the marine environment and then developed a workplan to mitigate those impacts going forward. These include monitoring fishery impacts on benthic habitats; decreasing fishery interactions with endangered species, such as loggerhead turtles and the Indo-Pacific finless porpoise; transitioning fishery management to precautionary and science-based strategies; and routine project participant progress meetings.

The unique topography, tidal currents and water temperatures in the marine areas of Hiroshima Prefecture make it an ideal location for oyster farming and fishing. The region accounts for two thirds of Japan’s oyster production, or 20,000 tonnes annually, some of which supplies the Japanese Consumers' Co-operative Union (JCCU), Japan’s largest consumer organization comprised of 29 million members.

FIP at a Glance

7% 21% 29% 43%
January 01, 2020
7% 21% 29% 43%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jul 2020
Target End Date
Feb 2021
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Seafood legacy
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Shunji Murakami
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

The fishery being assessed is comprised of pelagic longline vessels that target albacore tuna with incidental catch of bigeye and yellowfin tunas, fishing on the high seas of the Pacific Ocean. The agent vessels are managed by the Liancheng Overseas Fishery (Shenzhen) Company, and are flagged to China, Taiwan, the Federated States of Micronesia and Fiji. From time to time and where permitted, the vessels may fish in national EEZs including Cook Islands, FSM, Fiji, and Vanuatu. It is assumed in this pre-assessment that management within these EEZs is at least equal to the high seas.

The fishery being assessed is comprised of pelagic longline vessels that target albacore tuna with incidental catch of bigeye and yellowfin tunas, fishing on the high seas of the Pacific Ocean. The agent vessels are managed by the Liancheng Overseas Fishery (Shenzhen) Company, and are flagged to China, Taiwan, the Federated States of Micronesia and Fiji. From time to time and where permitted, the vessels may fish in national EEZs including Cook Islands, FSM, Fiji, and Vanuatu. It is assumed in this pre-assessment that management within these EEZs is at least equal to the high seas.

FIP at a Glance

11% 43% 46%
September 01, 2019
11% 43% 46%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2020
Target End Date
Sep 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Key Traceability Ltd.
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Tom Evans
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

The FIP is led by Pollock Catchers Association which represents 26 Russian fishing companies which harvest Alaska (Walleye) Pollock in the West Bering Sea Zone. Self-analysis made with OSMI Rapid Assessment Tool has revealed some areas where certain improvements may be needed to achieve an unconditional pass. To address that, the Pollock Catchers Association has designed a 3 year workplan that specifies specific actions aimed at making or initiating improvements. Improvements include collecting additional information about fishery's impact on certain elements of the ecosystem and preparation scientific information on MSC performance indicators needed for the asessement. Improvement actions were initiated in May 2019.

The FIP is led by Pollock Catchers Association which represents 26 Russian fishing companies which harvest Alaska (Walleye) Pollock in the West Bering Sea Zone. Self-analysis made with OSMI Rapid Assessment Tool has revealed some areas where certain improvements may be needed to achieve an unconditional pass. To address that, the Pollock Catchers Association has designed a 3 year workplan that specifies specific actions aimed at making or initiating improvements.

FIP at a Glance

29% 71%
September 01, 2019
29% 71%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2020
Target End Date
Sep 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Pollock Catchers Association
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Alexey Buglak
Email 
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

In Tomamae-cho, Hokkaido, about 10% of the population of 3,200 are employed in the fishing industry (2010 census). As with the trends for Japan as a whole, the fishing industry in Tomamae is in decline, experiencing a reduction in catches, an aging of the workforce, and a lack of new interest in the industry. The Tomamae Giant Pacific Octopus FIP aims to revitalize the region’s fisheries by improving the sustainability of fishing practices through the establishment of a science-based management plan for the octopus fishery, which is managed by the Kita-Rumoi Fisheries Cooperative. In addition to the environmental work, the group of barrel drift fishermen involved in the FIP want to use the project as a vehicle to generate further interest and investment in the region’s fisheries.

FIPプロフィールレポート

In Tomamae-cho, Hokkaido, about 10% of the population of 3,200 are employed in the fishing industry (2010 census). As with the trends for Japan as a whole, the fishing industry in Tomamae is in decline, experiencing a reduction in catches, an aging of the workforce, and a lack of new interest in the industry. The Tomamae Giant Pacific Octopus FIP aims to revitalize the region’s fisheries by improving the sustainability of fishing practices through the establishment of a science-based management plan for the octopus fishery, which is managed by the Kita-Rumoi Fisheries Cooperative.

FIP at a Glance

4% 25% 71%
April 01, 2019
4% 32% 64%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Oct 2020
Target End Date
Mar 2023

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Seafood Legacy
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Shunji Murakami
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

This FIP includes coastal trap nets (sea) and floating gill nets, fishing weirs (zaezdok) and beach seines (all in rivers), used to capture pink and chum salmon in the Amur River and adjacent parts of the Sea of Okhotsk (Amur Liman and Sakhalin Gulf) in the Nikolaevsk and Ulchi administrative Districts in (eastern) Russia’s Khabarovsk region. An MSC pre-assessment was completed for the fishery in 2018. The pre-assessment included four fishing companies who were interested in pursuing certification. Since completion of the pre-assessment in October 2018, two (Sakhalinskii Zaliv RK Ltd; and Amurskii Rybak) of the companies merged into the third, Amurskii Liman Ltd. One year later after another reorganization, Amurskii Liman became a new company, Shturman Ltd. As of the fall of 2019 the remaining companies, Ukhta-Prom Ltd and Shturman Ltd are now active FIP participants. These companies are not new (Ukhta-Prom Ltd since 2000 and Shturman Ltd (previously Amurkskii Liman) since 2011) to the region and have demonstrated a desire to sustain the fishing resources over the long-term to promote economic stability of the region by choosing sustainable fishing practices.

The Ukhta-Prom company is a member of the Association of Fish Industry Enterprises of the Khabarovsk Krai (region), contributing to the sustainable functioning and development of the fishery complex of the region. For several years the company has been participating in the project "Affordable Fish", helping to provide the residents of the region with fish products at affordable prices. Both companies support measures for the protection of aquatic biological resources and is in close cooperation with the Ministry of Natural Resources of the Khabarovsk Krai, the Federal Agency for Fisheries.

The only other salmon fishery, north of Nikolaevsk-na-Amure sought to achieve MSC certification in over a decade ago. In 2010, the Tugur River chum salmon fishery attempted to launch a FIP, however the project fell through due to lack of evident benefits to the fishing company and non-developed local engagement. Ukhta-Prom Ltd and Amurskii Liman are launching the first-ever comprehensive FIP on the Amur river and in wider Khabarovsk region with a goal to achieve MSC Certification. The companies currently sell their products in the Russian Federation, including the Khabarovsk Krai, Siberia, the Altai and Krasnoyarsk Krai, the Novosibirsk Region, Moscow and St. Petersburg, as well as China, Japan, and South Korea. Launching this FIP will potentially allow the fishery-clients to access new markets in North America and Europe.

According to stakeholders interviewed, illegal fishing is wide-spread in the area of the assessed fishery. Absence of information about illegal fishing significantly contribute to the low P1 scores. The management system is working towards reducing the level of illegal fishing, but it does not have quantitative information about levels and patterns of illegal fishing. Absence of such information does not allow us to assess the effectiveness of the enforcement activities.

There are 5 chum hatcheries located in the District so there are impacts to wild salmon populations due to enhancement activities. To properly manage stocks, it is necessary to know contribution of enhanced fish in the catch, escapement and hatchery broodstocks, which is usually achieved via marking of the hatchery production and sampling for marks. This approach is standard practice in most salmon fisheries with significant hatchery production. However, these practices are absent in the Amur River basin, although some efforts towards this are already undertaken.

The pre-assessment identified a number of issues that would likely prevent the fishery from achieving MSC certification in the near future:

  • Inability of the management system to adequately assess stock status of pink salmon relative to the management targets.

  • While the situation for chum is a little better due to a more developed stock assessment program, there are also problems with available information, and there is a significant hatchery program in the Amur River Basin.

  • Illegal fishing activities are known to be a problem for this area but there are no reliable estimates of the magnitude of IUU fishing.

  • There is a relatively large number of ETP species that are known to inhabit the Amur River Basin and Amur Liman, but no information about them and their interaction with the fishery and its impact on local ETP species is available.

This FIP is designed to address these issues and others identified in the pre-assessment so that the fishery can achieve MSC certification by 2025.

This FIP includes coastal trap nets (sea) and floating gill nets, fishing weirs (zaezdok) and beach seines (all in rivers), used to capture pink and chum salmon in the Amur River and adjacent parts of the Sea of Okhotsk (Amur Liman and Sakhalin Gulf) in the Nikolaevsk and Ulchi administrative Districts in (eastern) Russia’s Khabarovsk region. An MSC pre-assessment was completed for the fishery in 2018. The pre-assessment included four fishing companies who were interested in pursuing certification.

FIP at a Glance

14% 46% 39%
April 01, 2019
14% 46% 39%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jun 2020
Target End Date
Apr 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
ForSea Solutions LLC
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Natalia Novikova
Phone 
+19713319612
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

Reason for Inactivity 
This FIP merged with the Shantou-Taiwan Chinese common squid - jigging/single trawl FIP

Note: This FIP went inactive on May 13, 2020.

The FIP was launched in February 2018 by Beaver Street Fisheries and Shantou Haimao Foods Co. Ltd. Planned and implemented by China Blue.

The FIP aims to strengthen the cooperation between upstream and downstream of the industry chain in fishery resource information collection and sharing, with the intention of experimenting with the measures of spawning ground protection among the FIP participants, and ultimately establishing a regional co-management model around the Shantou-Taiwan bank fishing ground for octopus fishery resources to enhance local industry and government capacity to achieve sustainable development. 

Basic Information:

1- Target Stock: the shortarm octopus (Octopus Ocellatusfishery within the eastern Guangdong (Shantou) - Taiwan Bank Fishing Ground  (21°50'- 23°30'N, 116 °00'-119°30'E)

2- Fishing gear: jigging

3- Fleet involved: around 1000 small to medium scale fishing vessels harbored in Nan'ao Island, Shantou, Guangdong

Note: This FIP went inactive on May 13, 2020.

The FIP was launched in February 2018 by Beaver Street Fisheries and Shantou Haimao Foods Co. Ltd. Planned and implemented by China Blue.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
China Blue Sustainability Institute
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Han Han
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

By volume, China is the largest squid fishing and processing country in the world. The East China Sea and Yellow Sea, fished by Korean, Japanese, and Chinese fishing vessels, are significant squid fishing grounds. It’s there that Chinese trawl, purse seine, and gillnet vessels target Todarodes pacificus, or Japanese flying squid (JFS) together with other finfish species. JFS are highly migratory, having a broad geographic distribution and inhabiting both the open ocean and coastal regions of Northeast Asia. While there are great diversity and scope of JFS fisheries across Northeast Asia, the East China Sea and Yellow Sea Squid FIP will initially focus on improving Chinese JFS trawl fisheries operating within Chinese jurisdictions in East China and Yellow Seas. The primary markets for this product are the European Union, United States, Japan, and South Korea, although better supply chain analysis is needed to fully understand product flow and to elucidate any other squid species product mixing which might occur.

By volume, China is the largest squid fishing and processing country in the world. The East China Sea and Yellow Sea, fished by Korean, Japanese, and Chinese fishing vessels, are significant squid fishing grounds. It’s there that Chinese trawl, purse seine, and gillnet vessels target Todarodes pacificus, or Japanese flying squid (JFS) together with other finfish species. JFS are highly migratory, having a broad geographic distribution and inhabiting both the open ocean and coastal regions of Northeast Asia.

FIP at a Glance

46% 39% 14%
November 01, 2018
46% 39% 14%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Oct 2020
Target End Date
Dec 2023
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Ocean Outcomes
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Rich Lincoln
Organization Name 
China Aquatic Products Processing and Marketing Alliance (CAPPMA)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
He Cui
Organization Name 
Tao Ran
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Songlin Wang
Email 
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

China’s Fujian Province is the leading fishing region in China for a ‘red swimming crab species group’ (RSC) comprised of red swimming crab (Portunus haanii) and three-spot (or red-spot) swimming crab (Portunus sanguinolentus). On an annual basis, approximately 40,000 metric tons of RSC is caught in the province, most of which is processed in Zhangzhou. RSC is not only commercially important in China, but also supplies an important export market of crabmeat, much of which is imported by the United States in the form of canned crab. The Fujian Zhangzhou Red Swimming Crab FIP, comprised of over 1,000 bottom trawl and pot vessels, takes place on the Minnan-Taiwan Bank fishing grounds and is subject to a summer fishery closure common to all Chinese coastal areas. This closure attempts to protect fish stocks during the summer season, which is the general spawning and growth period for most economically important species. For the RSC fishery, the current lack of several key approaches—i.e., science-based stock assessments, the implementation of a minimum harvestable size limit, and maximum sustainable yield (MSY) fishery management strategies—represents a serious risk to the fishery as little is known about the actual stock status of target species. Since 2012, many processors have found that large crabs reaching the processable size, those with a carapace width of 8 cm or greater, have been decreasing in numbers. It’s estimated undersized crabs might account for as high as 80% of the harvest.

China’s Fujian Province is the leading fishing region in China for a ‘red swimming crab species group’ (RSC) comprised of red swimming crab (Portunus haanii) and three-spot (or red-spot) swimming crab (Portunus sanguinolentus). On an annual basis, approximately 40,000 metric tons of RSC is caught in the province, most of which is processed in Zhangzhou. RSC is not only commercially important in China, but also supplies an important export market of crabmeat, much of which is imported by the United States in the form of canned crab.

FIP at a Glance

21% 64% 14%
August 01, 2018
21% 64% 14%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jun 2020
Target End Date
Dec 2022
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Ocean Outcomes
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Rich Lincoln
Organization Name 
Tao Ran
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Songlin Wang
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

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