Bottom Gillnet

Overview

On average, approximately 772 tonnes of saithe were landed annually in mixed demersal fisheries by Irish vessels between 2016 and 2018, 40% of which were caught in the South of Ireland within ICES Area 7.g and 26% caught in 7.j. In 2018, 601 tonnes of saithe were landed which were worth approximately €672,700 for Irish vessels.

Catches of saithe by Irish vessels are mainly taken by bottom otter trawl (mainly in Subarea 6) and set gillnets (mainly in subarea 7) in the following fisheries:

Gillnet fisheries:

• Mixed whitefish gillnet fishery alongside ling and pollack

• Bycatch in hake gillnet fishery

Bottom otter trawl fisheries:

• Small bycatch in fishery targeting anglerfish, megrims, and hake.

• Small bycatch in fishery targeting whiting

• Small bycatch in fishery targeting Nephrops

• During trawling trips for other species a few days may be spent targeting saithe – this is a clean fishery directed at homogeneous shoals of saithe.

On average, approximately 772 tonnes of saithe were landed annually in mixed demersal fisheries by Irish vessels between 2016 and 2018, 40% of which were caught in the South of Ireland within ICES Area 7.g and 26% caught in 7.j. In 2018, 601 tonnes of saithe were landed which were worth approximately €672,700 for Irish vessels.

Catches of saithe by Irish vessels are mainly taken by bottom otter trawl (mainly in Subarea 6) and set gillnets (mainly in subarea 7) in the following fisheries:

Gillnet fisheries:

• Mixed whitefish gillnet fishery alongside ling and pollack

FIP at a Glance

22% 67% 11%
November 01, 2020
22% 67% 11%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jul 2021
Target End Date
Oct 2025
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Verifish
Organization Type 
Other
Primary Contact 
Frank Fleming
Email 
Phone 
00353214928934
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
14442

Overview

The FIP is targetting blue swimming crab (Portunus pelagicus) from the Palk Bay region of the Tamil Nadu coast in India.

The fishing gear is gill net (nandu valai). Each “nandu valai” is about 1000 m long with 40-50 joints and 80-100cm in height and weighs about 55 Kg. The netting is made of high-density nylon mono-filament with a stretched mesh of 90-110 mm. The head rope is nylon with a 1.5 cm in thickness and small floats are attached at intervals of about one and a half feet or marked by a flag and the footrope is with small sinkers. Each weighs about 20g and in one complete stretch of the net, a total of 350 numbers of sinkers are there weighing about 7kg in total weight (BSC FMP). The crew on each fishing boat deploying gillnets at sea, tie several nets (also called gillnet joints) end to end forming a long chain so that they cover a considerable area at sea (e.g. Devipattinam - 12 nets x 70 meters used in OBBSGN). 

The crafts involved in the fishery are classified as Outboard bottom set gillnets (OBBSGN), Nonmechanised bottom set gillnets (NMBSGN), Inboard bottom set gillnets (IBBSGN) and Outboard gillnets (OBGN) (Srinath et al., 2005). The crafts employed for gillnet operation include catamarans, plank-built boats, dugout canoes, and fiberglass coated plywood boats. Motorization of the gillnet crafts, by fitting inboard or outboard engines is also reported, and in recent years’ fiberglass boats with an overall length range of 6-10 m are more commonly used for deploying fishing gears. 

The Blue Swimming Crab (BSC) gillnet fishers in Palk Bay operate under an open-access regime that is based on a top-down management approach with several applicable laws at Federal, State & District levels. Gillnets locally called “Nandu valai” primarily target Portunus pelagicus which comprises more than 98% of the crab landings (CMFRI 2018) with the remaining 2% comprised of Portunus sanguinolentus and Charybdis natator species. BSC fishery in Palk Bay is managed by Tamil Nadu State Fisheries Department (DoF) which issues licenses for fishing boats and applies several management measures (3 days: 4 days Rule for mechanized boats, a token system for trawlers, etc.) to mitigate conflicts between various actors (fishing boats and trawlers). A good account of the management history, fishing practices, historical fishing levels, and other resource attributes in Palk Bay is provided in Stephen et al, (2013); Salagrama (2014); and CMFRI (2018) reports.  
 

The FIP is targetting blue swimming crab (Portunus pelagicus) from the Palk Bay region of the Tamil Nadu coast in India.

FIP at a Glance

29% 43% 29%
October 01, 2019
39% 32% 29%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
May 2021
Target End Date
Apr 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Crab Meat Processors Association
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Sanil Kumar S
Phone 
04652 248458; 9486488017
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
11863

Overview

The Sri Lanka blue swimming crab fisheries improvement project (FIP) is a tripartite initiative that brings together small scale fishermen from four districts (Jaffna, Kilinochchi, Mannar and Puttalam), seafood companies (Taprobane Seafood Group Pvt Ltd and CM Blue Crab Pvt Ltd) and government agencies (Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources and the National Aquatic Resources Agency). The FIP is designed, coordinated, implemented, monitored, and internally evaluated by pelagikos pvt ltd.

The target stocks are blue swimming crab (Portunus pelagicus) populations in the Palk Bay (northern Sri Lanka) and the Gulf of Mannar (northwestern Sri Lanka). The fishing method is bottom-set crab nets (approximately 1 kilometer long and 50 cm high). The fleet of vessels pursuing the stock comprises in the region of 4,500 fibre-reinforced plastic boats with outboard engines, operating from 76 landing centres in the two fisheries. All the vessels are registered and the fishermen have operating licences.

The Sri Lanka blue swimming crab fisheries improvement project (FIP) is a tripartite initiative that brings together small scale fishermen from four districts (Jaffna, Kilinochchi, Mannar and Puttalam), seafood companies (Taprobane Seafood Group Pvt Ltd and CM Blue Crab Pvt Ltd) and government agencies (Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources and the National Aquatic Resources Agency). The FIP is designed, coordinated, implemented, monitored, and internally evaluated by pelagikos pvt ltd.

FIP at a Glance

29% 71%
November 01, 2013
75% 25%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
May 2021
Target End Date
Dec 2021

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
pelagikos private limited
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Steve Creech
Phone 
00 94 77 35 83 135
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
7510

Overview

Reason for Inactivity 
Missed two consecutive reports

Note: This FIP went inactive on April 2, 2019.

The National Sole Fishery Co-Management Committee (NASCOM), The Department of Fisheries of the Ministry of Fisheries, Water Resources and National Assembly Matters of The Gambia and the Atlantic Seafood Company Ltd. are committed partners to this FIP.  NASCOM has been delegated management responsibility and exclusive use rights to the sole fishery and associated marine catfish fishery in the artisanal zone (out to 9 nautical miles along the Atlantic coast) in a gazetted Sole Fishery Co-Management Plan. NASCOM is coordinating this FIP.

Note: This FIP went inactive on April 2, 2019.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
National Sole Fishery Co-Management Committee (NASCOM)
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Dawda Fodey Saine
Phone 
+220 745 3623
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
6351

Overview

The Philippines blue swimming crab is a cosmopolitan species in the coastal waters in the Philippines. This fishery is a significant sub-sector of the crustacean fishery. More than 90% of the catch is from municipal waters, caught within 15 km from the coastline by fishing boats weighing less than 3 gross tonnes. Entangling nets and crab trap/pot are generally used as fishing gears. The stock is steadily declining in volume and size as a result of the depletion of the spawning biomass. Hence, it is the aim of the FIP to rebuild the fishery to a sustainable level in the area of the Visayan Sea and nearby waters. 

The FIP works in an integrated approach through (1) collaborative work with government and NGOs, academia and other legal entities; (2) an active information and education campaign; (3) supply chain management; and (4) development of projects and policies that promote sustainability of blue swimming crabs. 

The MSC Fishery Standard is the guiding framework of the FIP. Priority projects and initiatives include assessment of stock status, stock enhancement initiatives (establishment of hatcheries and installation of holding cages for egg-bearing crabs), promotion of ecologically-sound gears, campaign awareness programs, capacity building of local communities and increasing support for the implementation of the Philippine blue swimming crab management plan of the government.

The FIP is being initiated by The Philippine Association of Crab Processors, Inc. (PACPI), a group of blue swimming crab processing and exporting companies that operate mainly within the Visayan area. The association was founded in May 2009 in an effort to foster a good relationship among the crab processing sector and to support initiatives promoting blue swimming crab sustainability in the country. At present, 6 of the 8 major companies operating in the Philippines are members of PACPI, representing ninety percent (90%) of the blue swimming crab industry, and are actively providing financial support in the implementation of blue swimming crab sustainability projects. The member companies of PACPI include:

  • Blue Star Foods Philippines
  • Byrd International Seafoods Cebu
  • Cebu Canning Corporation
  • Central Seafoods, Inc.
  • Phil-Union Frozen Foods, Inc.
  • RGE Agridev Corporation

The Philippines blue swimming crab is a cosmopolitan species in the coastal waters in the Philippines. This fishery is a significant sub-sector of the crustacean fishery. More than 90% of the catch is from municipal waters, caught within 15 km from the coastline by fishing boats weighing less than 3 gross tonnes. Entangling nets and crab trap/pot are generally used as fishing gears. The stock is steadily declining in volume and size as a result of the depletion of the spawning biomass.

FIP at a Glance

46% 43% 11%
July 01, 2015
82% 14% 4%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jul 2021
Target End Date
Dec 2024
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Philippine Association of Crab Processors, Inc.
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Marinelle S. Espino
Phone 
+63322394883
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
6166

Overview

The Canada Atlantic cod (2J3KL) longline, trawl, gillnet and hook & line FIP is led by the Atlantic Groundfish Council (AGC) and the Association of Seafood Producers (ASP), with major retail funding from Marks & Spencer, Young's Seafood, Sysco France and High Liner Foods; and with in-kind support from Sustainable Fisheries Fund and Atlantic Canadian institutions including Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Memorial University, Dalhousie University and Ocean Tracking Network.

The FIP was launched in April 2015 with actions well underway on a number of fronts, assisted by a formal MSC Pre-Assessment that scopes out the challenges to be addressed in order to receive MSC certification. A DFO 2J3KL Cod Recovery Working Group was created in 2012 and includes representatives of all Stakeholders; the development of draft harvest control rules (HCR) is well advanced. An Integrated Fishery Management Plan (IFMP) is under development and should be completed in 2017. Much of the habitat and ecosystem information has already been assembled by FIP Participants, in part as evidence for the MSC certification of other directed fisheries in the same area (2J3KLNO). Coral and sponge concentrations have been identified using DFO’s research vessel surveys and formal peer-review processes.

FIP members continue to advocate a ‘go slow’ precautionary approach to setting catch limits for this recovering stock.  Examples of our public position on this issue can be seen in recent media communications, (see ‘Background on Atlantic Groundfish Council Northern Cod Position_Mar 2019’ under the Additional Supporting Documentation link in the Detail Tab).

The Canada Atlantic cod (2J3KL) longline, trawl, gillnet and hook & line FIP is led by the Atlantic Groundfish Council (AGC) and the Association of Seafood Producers (ASP), with major retail funding from Marks & Spencer, Young's Seafood, Sysco France and High Liner Foods; and with in-kind support from Sustainable Fisheries Fund and Atlantic Canadian institutions including Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Memorial University, Dalhousie University and Ocean Tracking Network.

FIP at a Glance

11% 14% 75%
February 01, 2015
11% 32% 57%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jun 2021
Target End Date
Dec 2025
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Association of Seafood Producers
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Derek Butler
Phone 
(709) 726-3730
Organization Name 
Atlantic Groundfish Council
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Kris Vascotto
Phone 
(902) 526-4582
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
3156

Overview

The Surat Thani blue swimming crab fishery is an important export product for Thailand with an export value of $60-80 million USD. The unit of assessment is located in the Gulf of Thailand Gulf of Thailand (between 6° and 13.5° North and 99° and 104.5° East). There are a number of critical issues facing this fishery, including the overexploitation of populations in heavily fished inshore areas, harvest of undersized crab and gravid females, lack of management plans or harvest strategies, and lack of enforcement capacity. Through the active involvement of FIP stakeholders - including the Department of Fisheries (DoF), Department of Marine and Coastal Resources (DMCR), Thai Frozen Food Association (TFFA), Thai Crab Product Group (TCPG) - and FIP participants, the sustainability challenges facing this fishery are being addressed.

The Surat Thani blue swimming crab fishery is an important export product for Thailand with an export value of $60-80 million USD. The unit of assessment is located in the Gulf of Thailand Gulf of Thailand (between 6° and 13.5° North and 99° and 104.5° East). There are a number of critical issues facing this fishery, including the overexploitation of populations in heavily fished inshore areas, harvest of undersized crab and gravid females, lack of management plans or harvest strategies, and lack of enforcement capacity.

FIP at a Glance

21% 50% 29%
February 01, 2017
86% 14%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jun 2021
Target End Date
Dec 2023
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Sea Purpose Co., Ltd
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Mod Talawat
Phone 
6691 463 5462
Organization Name 
World Wildlife Fund - US
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Michael Osmond
Phone 
4436833884
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
3146

Overview

Reason for Inactivity 
Lack of stakeholder support

Note: This FIP went inactive on May 29, 2019.

The Jepara Regency Blue Swimming Crab FIP was initiated as a supply chain driven project with a crab processor, cook station operators, and a group of crab fishers with the goal of ensuring compliance with national regulation, sustainability of the fishery, and continual livelihoods for the crab fishers. The target stock is blue swimming crab (Portunus pelagicus) which is caught with lines of gillnets on the sea floor up to 40km from shore and the crab fishing fleet involved in this FIP comprises the fishers in the Jepara Regency, Central Java, Indonesia.

Note: This FIP went inactive on May 29, 2019.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Harbor Seafood, Inc.
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Timothy Hromatka
Phone 
+62 81236724241
Organization Name 
Harbor Seafood, Inc.
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Chris Holmgren
Phone 
+1 616 634 3474
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
3091

Overview

 Northern cod, one of the world’s largest and most iconic fisheries, was instrumental in the development of the New World by Europeans in Canada. Excessive fishing combined with ecosystem change led to the collapse of cod in the 1990s, resulted in the largest lay-off in North America with 30,000 lost jobs in Newfoundland and Labrador. The socio-cultural fabric of the province was shaped by this 500 year old fishery, the loss of livelihood resulted in the alteration of a people’s way of life. From the species perspective the decline and subsequent collapse of the Northern cod stock represents one of the world’s worst ecological disasters.

Over the past 25 years, the only northern cod pulled from our waters has been caught by other directed fisheries as bycatch; by an in-shore cod stewardship fishery; by scientific fishing sets and in recreational fishing activity. However, there is reason for optimism around the future of a commercial fishery. Recent biomass indicators show significant improvement in stock biomass– though still well below biomass limit for direct commercial fishing–and positive stock indicators, such as age profile. Environmental conditions are also generally positive for the stock.

LAUNCHING THE NORTHERN COD FISHERY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

In April 2015, WWF-Canada embarked on a fishery improvement project (FIP) to bring back Newfoundland and Labrador’s northern cod stock, signing a landmark agreement with the largest private-sector union in the province, the Fish, Food and Allied Workers (FFAW) Union. Formalizing our partnership with the FFAW, which represents harvesters, was the first major step in launching a five-year initiative to improve the sustainability of the only existing northern cod fishery—a small-scale, stewardship fishery with around 9,600  metric tonnes of annual landings—so that it may enter into the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certification process. WWF-Canada and the FFAW also secured support for the FIP from the Seafood Producers of Newfoundland and Labrador, Fogo Island Co-op and the NL- Groundfish Industry Development Council.

The FIP process formally commenced in November 2015 with a MSC pre-assessment that identified the issues that needed to be addressed to improve the sustainability of the stock. A stakeholder meeting that included participants from all sectors of the industry was held in September 2016 to help develop a FIP action plan to tackle the problems in the fishery. The Action plan was launched publicly in December 2016 that includes the necessary actions to address the issues of concerns in the fishery, responsible parties and timelines. In 2017 we shall commence the implementation of the activities identified in the Action Plan to address the issues and concerns that were identified in the pre-assessment. Our goal is to move the current fishery towards a sustainable viable full scale commercial fishery that will benefit the people and communities that depend on it to thrive.

FIPプロフィールレポート

 Northern cod, one of the world’s largest and most iconic fisheries, was instrumental in the development of the New World by Europeans in Canada. Excessive fishing combined with ecosystem change led to the collapse of cod in the 1990s, resulted in the largest lay-off in North America with 30,000 lost jobs in Newfoundland and Labrador. The socio-cultural fabric of the province was shaped by this 500 year old fishery, the loss of livelihood resulted in the alteration of a people’s way of life.

FIP at a Glance

7% 7% 86%
December 01, 2016
7% 14% 79%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Feb 2021
Target End Date
Dec 2025
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Fish, Food and Allied Workers Union/UNIFOR
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Dwan Street
Phone 
7095767276
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
2626

Overview

Reason for Inactivity 
Lack of ability to implement and enforce meaningful regulation

Note: This FIP went inactive on January 27, 2020.

The Kien Giang blue swimming crab fishery supports the livelihoods of an estimated 20,000 fishers and their families. The blue swimming crab is also an important export product for Vietnam. Yet there are critical issues facing this fishery, including the harvest of undersized crab and gravid females, a lack of sound knowledge of the health of the stock, and lack of enforcement capacity. Through the active involvement of FIP stakeholders, such as the Department of Agriculture and Resource Development (DARD), Research Institute Fisheries Management and Provincial Peoples Committee, and FIP participants, the sustainability challenges facing this fishery are being addressed.

Note: This FIP went inactive on January 27, 2020.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Vietnam Association of Seafood Exporters & Producers (VASEP)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Ms Tran Thuy Que Phuong - VCC Secretary
Phone 
+84.2862.810.430
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
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