Handline

Overview

The handline fishery is the most important, in terms of foreign exchange revenue. Current landings are about 28,000 MT annually, of which 80% is exported, mostly in fresh chilled form. These exports are worth about 70 million USD a year. 

The fishery targets surface-dwelling large yellowfin tuna, which in non-handline fisheries are often associated with dolphins. While Maldivians know of the fishery potential of yellowfin tuna, a targeted fishery using handlines started 1990s as a response to the private sector involvement in fresh tuna exports.  Livebait, often scads (Selar crumenophthalmus, Decapterus macarellus)  and triggerfish (Odonus niger), are used to attract and maintain large yellowfin tuna schools. Hooked scads/triggerfish on handline leads with sinkers are used to catch yellowfin and hauled manually. The fish are killed immediately, gilled, gutted, and bled before being stored on flake ice.  

The fishery is highly selective with no bycatch and virtually no negative interactions with ETP species.

The scope of the FIP is the entire Maldives handline fishery, conducted throughout the archipelago, but generally restricted to the south-central, central, and northern regions. The Maldives fishery segment is part of the wider Indian Ocean yellowfin tuna stock, but this fishery targets only adult tuna within the Maldivian EEZ.

Of the roughly 800 licensed tuna vessels in the Maldives, about 50% target exclusively yellowfin using handlines. The fishing licenses are renewed every year and managed by the Maldives Ministry of Fisheries, Marine Resources, and Agriculture.
 

The handline fishery is the most important, in terms of foreign exchange revenue. Current landings are about 28,000 MT annually, of which 80% is exported, mostly in fresh chilled form. These exports are worth about 70 million USD a year. 

FIP at a Glance

4% 25% 71%
May 01, 2021
4% 25% 71%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Oct 2021
Target End Date
May 2026
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
International Pole and Line and Foundation
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Shiham Adam
Phone 
+9607792687
Organization Name 
Malidves Seafood Processors and Exporters Association
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Shafin Ahmed
Phone 
+9607753978
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
15236

Overview

Recognising the need for sustainable fisheries (governance, economic and social development), the squid fishery enrolled onto the MSC Fish for Good Indonesia programme in 2019. The main purpose is to develop a Fisheries Management Plan for squid, working alongside IPB University (Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences) and the Indonesia Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries Department (MMAF) for eventual roll-out to other squid fishing communities in Fisheries Management Area (FMA) 571.

The squid fishery is located in the Belawan area, Medan, in the North Sumatra province of Indonesia and is part of FMA 571.

Squid are caught traditionally by using handline with jigs on small registered vessels that fish 12-15 miles off the north-east coast of Medan (Unit of Certification). It is worth noting that no other gear type is used during fishing.

This FIP has now successfully entered the In-Transition to MSC (ITM) program with a commitment to achieving MSC certification and full assessment after completing the ITM period.

On the 20th of April 2021, the FIP was awared the MSC OSF funding for 2 years. Full details of the global press release and  award can be found on the following links:

https://www.msc.org/media-centre/press-releases/press-release/marine-stewardship-council-funds-ocean-projects-to-drive-progress-in-sustainable-fishing

https://www.msc.org/what-we-are-doing/our-collective-impact/ocean-stewardship-fund/impact-projects/minimising-fishing-impacts-on-indonesian-squid-stocks-2021

Recognising the need for sustainable fisheries (governance, economic and social development), the squid fishery enrolled onto the MSC Fish for Good Indonesia programme in 2019. The main purpose is to develop a Fisheries Management Plan for squid, working alongside IPB University (Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences) and the Indonesia Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries Department (MMAF) for eventual roll-out to other squid fishing communities in Fisheries Management Area (FMA) 571.

FIP at a Glance

25% 14% 61%
February 01, 2021
25% 14% 61%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Aug 2021
Target End Date
Jun 2026

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Rai Seafoods Limited
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Rosida Idriss
Phone 
+44 (0) 7876-134302
Organization Name 
IPB University (Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences)
Organization Type 
Other
Primary Contact 
Dr. M. Mukhlis Kamal
Phone 
+62 (0) 251-8622932
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
15044

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

The International Pole & Line Foundation (IPNLF), Prime Seafood Brazil and Sea Delight LLC, entered into a memorandum of understanding (MOU) to further their shared goals and activities related to establishing and implementing a FIP for a yellowfin tuna handline fishery in Northeast Brazil with the aim to achieve Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certification, and assist this fishery to better meet international market requirements.  

A pre-assessment against the MSC Standard using the Fishery Certification Requirements version 2.0 was executed by CeDePesca, forming the basis of the FIP Action Plan.

Through the FIP, Sea Delight, Prime Seafood Brazil and IPNLF are committed to promoting and supporting this fishery. Handline fisheries are widely regarded as one of the most ecologically and socially responsible methods to harvest tuna.

This relatively new fishery developed around 2011/2012 when a Brazil spiny lobster fishery went into severe decline and many fishers began to look for more sustainable alternatives to support their families.

The International Pole & Line Foundation (IPNLF), Prime Seafood Brazil and Sea Delight LLC, entered into a memorandum of understanding (MOU) to further their shared goals and activities related to establishing and implementing a FIP for a yellowfin tuna handline fishery in Northeast Brazil with the aim to achieve Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certification, and assist this fishery to better meet international market requirements.  

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
International Pole & Line Foundation
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Yaiza Dronkers Londoño
Organization Name 
Sea Delight, LLC
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Stephen Fisher
Organization Name 
Prime Seafood Brazil
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Geraldo Cosentino
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
14859
Expiration Date 
November 2021

Overview

The Indonesia Western and Central Pacific Ocean yellowfin tuna - handline (IPNLF) FIP, aims to meet sustainability criteria for MSC certification through a process of implementing a Fishery Improvement Project, and assist these fisheries to better meet international market requirements. An MSC pre-assessment was completed in 2018 (Hough Associates), a FIP action plan was developed for associated Units of Assessement (UoAs) in November 2019, and the FIP is subject to regular review.

Together, the International Pole & Line Foundation (IPNLF) with FIP partners PT. Deho Canning and PT. Citraraja Ampat Canning (CRA), are driving the FIP with fishery stakeholders. An assessment was conducted on PT. Deho Canning and PT. CRA supply-chains that identified at least 2 Units of Assessment (UoAs) in Sorong and Bitung, to implement a FIP and move towards MSC certification. A national FIP Steering Committee, led by the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF) via a decree issued by the Director of Fishery Resource Management (2016), which is a platform for all tuna FIPs in Indonesia to engage with government. The FIP Steering Committee meets regularly and provides a vehicle for cross-sector collaboration to achieve sustainability objectives. 

Indonesia has a long tradition of catching tuna using handlines. Through the FIP, PT Deho Canning, PT CRA and IPNLF are committed to promoting and supporting these fisheries, which are widely regarded as one of the most ecologically and socially responsible methods to harvest tuna. Handline tuna fisheries are typically ‘green-rated' by NGOs and form a core component of many major buyers’ sourcing commitments.

The FIP aims to increase knowledge about and application of international sustainability standards, to improve cross-sector collaboration, enhance fishery transparency and traceability, and advance the implementation of national and regional conservation management measures. Through this initiative, IPNLF, PT Deho Canning, PT Citraraja Ampat Canning, and its partners will demonstrate the benefits of a well-managed Indonesian fishery for food security, livelihoods, and sustainable businesses.

The Indonesia Western and Central Pacific Ocean yellowfin tuna - handline (IPNLF) FIP, aims to meet sustainability criteria for MSC certification through a process of implementing a Fishery Improvement Project, and assist these fisheries to better meet international market requirements. An MSC pre-assessment was completed in 2018 (Hough Associates), a FIP action plan was developed for associated Units of Assessement (UoAs) in November 2019, and the FIP is subject to regular review.

FIP at a Glance

32% 68%
December 01, 2019
36% 64%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2021
Target End Date
Dec 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
International Pole & Line Foundation
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Jeremy Crawford
Organization Name 
PT. Citraraja Ampat Canning
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Mintojo Wibisono
Organization Name 
PT. Deho Canning
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Mintojo Wibisono
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
12441

Overview

Target Species (1) Red Octopus (Octopus maya), in Spanish Pulpo maya o rojo and (2) Common Octopus (O. vulgaris), in Spanish Pulpo patón o común. Geographical Area - Province of Yucatan

Method of Capture : Red Octopus: Fishing drifting rod with lines containing bait, no hook, this method is known locally as gareteo, Common Octopus: Also employs a fishing rod with lines and bait, in this fishery a hook is used at the line and in Yucatan peninsula the pole and line fishing gear is also used.

Stock(s) - The Red Octopus is an endemic species from Mexico and is a member of the family Octopodidae. Its known distribution is from the waters adjacent to Isla del Carmen in Campeche to Isla Mujeres in Quintana Roo. One single stock is exploited based on genetic studies. The Common Octopus has a wide distribution in tropical and subtropical regions in the world. In particular, in Mexico, it is distributed throughout the Gulf of Mexico, it is found from the coastline up to 400 m deep, but it is more abundant below 100 m and its abundance decreases as depth increases. It is exploited in the Yucatan Peninsula and Veracruz. No genetic studies are available that could be used to establish a stock structure.

Fleet(s) Red Octopus: Small-scale and medium-scale fleets with octopus permits fishing and landing in the State of Yucatan, Mexico. Common Octopus: medium-scale fleets with octopus permits fishing and landing in the State of Yucatan, Mexico.
 

Target Species (1) Red Octopus (Octopus maya), in Spanish Pulpo maya o rojo and (2) Common Octopus (O. vulgaris), in Spanish Pulpo patón o común. Geographical Area - Province of Yucatan

Method of Capture : Red Octopus: Fishing drifting rod with lines containing bait, no hook, this method is known locally as gareteo, Common Octopus: Also employs a fishing rod with lines and bait, in this fishery a hook is used at the line and in Yucatan peninsula the pole and line fishing gear is also used.

FIP at a Glance

10% 34% 55%
January 01, 2019
14% 36% 50%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Aug 2021
Target End Date
Dec 2023

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Comunidad y Biodiversidad, A.C.
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Lorena Rocha
Phone 
+52 622 222 49 90
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
10470

Overview

Swordfish is a highly migratory species of fish found throughout most of the world’s oceans. This FIP focuses on the Western and Central North Pacific Ocean (WCNPO) swordfish stock, under the management of the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC), fished by the Vietnamese handline and hand-operated longline fishery.

The Vietnamese handline fishery began operating in late 2011. The fishery primarily targets large tunas — such as yellowfin and bigeye — in offshore areas within the Vietnam Economic Exclusive Zone (EEZ), although swordfish and other large pelagic species are also taken. Handliners attract fish using bait and lights, with vessels usually operating up to four lines, each with two hooks. The length of a fishing trip is approximately 25 days. There is incomplete information available on the fleet, but possibly close to 1,500 vessels are currently operating (source: MRAG MSC PA citing tuna pre-assessment, 2013).

Currently, the fleet is composed of handline vessels only.  Vessels are licensed at the provincial level but any management measures (i.e. capacity management and operational restrictions) are generally imposed at a national level.  All fishing currently occurs within the Vietnam EEZ.

All catch is initially landed in Vietnam, with higher quality catch exported as both whole fish and processed product. The remainder is retained for local consumption and processing.

Key problems/issues:

According to the MSC Pre-Assessment of the fishery (MRAG 2017), the main obstacles to sustainability were:

  • No explicit limit or target reference points are defined by which to manage the exploitation of the stock more robustly.
  • There is not a well-defined harvest control rule in place for swordfish, although there are rules and management tools available from other fisheries in the Western Central Pacific Fishery Commission (WCPFC) area for reducing catch or effort in the swordfish fishery should critical limits be approached.
  • Currently, there is not sufficient information to rule out the finning of sharks.
  • There is poor information on catches in the fishery.
  • There is little information regarding bycatch and ETP species in the fishery.
  • The fishery management system in Vietnam does not explicitly embody the precautionary approach and certain provisions of conservation and management of the WCPFC need to be addressed by the national legislation.  
  • There are no fishery-specific objectives for swordfish at the national level.
  • There is no management plan for the fishery.
  • There are shortcomings in addressing illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing in the country.

The FIP is working to solve these issues and to attain a certifiable status by July 2022.

Swordfish is a highly migratory species of fish found throughout most of the world’s oceans. This FIP focuses on the Western and Central North Pacific Ocean (WCNPO) swordfish stock, under the management of the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC), fished by the Vietnamese handline and hand-operated longline fishery.

FIP at a Glance

29% 29% 43%
October 01, 2018
32% 39% 29%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Apr 2021
Target End Date
Jul 2022
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Sea Delight
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Stephen Fisher
Organization Name 
Hong Ngoc Seafood
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Yen Nguyen
Organization Name 
CeDePesca
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Gabriela Mc Lean
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
10260

Overview

Reason for Inactivity 
This FIP merged with the comprehensive FIP, Indonesia snapper and grouper - bottom longline, dropline, trap, and gillnet (ADI)

The target for this FIP is snapper & grouper in Java Sea that is landed in Brondong Archipelagic Fishing Port, Lamongan, East Java. Mostly, the gear used by fishers is dropline and handline. The fishers usually go out on fishing trips for about 4 to 9 days, with vessels less than 30 GT.

The target for this FIP is snapper & grouper in Java Sea that is landed in Brondong Archipelagic Fishing Port, Lamongan, East Java. Mostly, the gear used by fishers is dropline and handline. The fishers usually go out on fishing trips for about 4 to 9 days, with vessels less than 30 GT.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
PT Alam Jaya Seafood
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Dedi Sukanto
Organization Name 
PT Bahari Biru Nusantara
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Hadi Wijaja
Email 
Organization Name 
PT Inti Lautan Fajar Abadi
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Geerry Kosasih
Organization Name 
PT Kelola Mina Laut
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Windra H. Putra
Organization Name 
PT Kemilau Bintang Timur
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Yudo Broto
Organization Name 
PT Varia Niaga Nusantara
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Hariono Lowis
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
9276

Overview

The Indonesian Indian Ocean yellowfin tuna handline FIP is a subset of the wider handline and pole and line FIP work, collaboratively implemented bt MDPI, IPNLF and AP2HI. The FIP has support from the Indonesian MMAF and is implemented in collaboration with provincial government and industry stakeholders.

A pole-and-line and handline tuna fisheries MSC pre-assessment was created and updated in 2018 by Hough Associates Ltd., and the FIP encompassing these UoA's are subject to regular and independent reviews. 

The yellowfin tuna handline FIP In the Indonesian Indian Ocean involves industry partners who have actively engaged with sustainability improvement projects over several years and implement various programs and improvements in their supply chains, either independently or in collaboration with organisations such as MDPI, IPNLF and AP2HI. Major activities with which industry are involved include a robust port sampling program, participation in an industry association and in provincially based co-management initiatives. Additionally, many industry partners are also engaging in inprovements related to supply chain transparency and traceability to combat IUU issues. Increasing collaboration and involvement of the government, especially the processing, marketing and competitiveness directortate is ensuring continued progress of the FIP from both an industry and a regulator perspective.

The Indonesian Indian Ocean yellowfin tuna handline FIP is a subset of the wider handline and pole and line FIP work, collaboratively implemented bt MDPI, IPNLF and AP2HI. The FIP has support from the Indonesian MMAF and is implemented in collaboration with provincial government and industry stakeholders.

A pole-and-line and handline tuna fisheries MSC pre-assessment was created and updated in 2018 by Hough Associates Ltd., and the FIP encompassing these UoA's are subject to regular and independent reviews. 

FIP at a Glance

4% 39% 57%
June 01, 2018
4% 39% 57%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2021
Target End Date
Jun 2023
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
MDPI
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Wildan
Phone 
+628123827067
Organization Name 
IPNLF
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Jeremy Crawford
Organization Name 
Asosiasi Perikanan Pole & Line dan Handline Indonesia
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Ilham Alhaq
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
9012

Overview

Mexico is the primary global producer of ocean whitefish (Caulolatilus princeps) with 94% of national landings coming from the state of Baja California Sur. Nevertheless, there are no species-specific management measures in place for this fishery. The only management tool in place is fishing permits for finfish that specify the number of boats and gear that can be used per permit holder.

The fishing cooperative Buzos y Pescadores de la Baja California S.C.L. located on Isla Natividad, Baja California Sur have demonstrated their commitment to sustainability through the establishment of marine reserves in collaboration with Comunidad y Biodiversidad, A. C. (COBI), MSC certification of their lobster fishery, Seafood Watch green rating of their yellowtail fishery, and a restoration program for abalone in collaboration with the state government and academia. In recent years, they have shown an increased interest in developing more sustainable finfish fisheries, such as ocean whitefish.

A relatively new fishery, the directed catch of ocean whitefish started in 2011 as an economic alternative to high-value benthic fisheries that have been declining in recent years. The cooperatives initial production of 3.7 T in 2011 increased to 13.4 T in 2016 and is expected to increase further as demand grows. As a result, the cooperative approached SmartFish in 2017, expressing their interest in conducting a fisheries improvement project. The FIP is exclusive to boats belonging to the cooperative Buzos y Pescadores that fish with handlines and traps.  

In the winter of 2017 Pronatura Noreste conducted a Marine Stewardship Council pre-assessment of the Isla Natividad ocean whitefish fishery. The main concerns identified by the preliminary assessment were the lack of a formal stock assessment and bycatch management strategy. The status of habitats and ecosystem impacts were identified as minor concerns; however, the potential impact of fishing gear needs to be evaluated.

In addition, SmartFish A.C. is working to improve access to markets that value sustainability and implement digital traceability.

Mexico is the primary global producer of ocean whitefish (Caulolatilus princeps) with 94% of national landings coming from the state of Baja California Sur. Nevertheless, there are no species-specific management measures in place for this fishery. The only management tool in place is fishing permits for finfish that specify the number of boats and gear that can be used per permit holder.

FIP at a Glance

21% 11% 68%
June 01, 2018
25% 14% 61%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
B Good Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jul 2021
Target End Date
Jun 2021

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Comunidad y Biodiversidad, A. C. (COBI)
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Alesa Flores
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
8506

Overview

The Cooperative Ensenada is located on the west coast of the state of Baja California (BC) and has been active since 1940. Currently, this cooperative has 84 members and 159 people employed in the processing plant (129 men and 30 women) and has two concessions: abalone and red lobster. This cooperative serves the local and global market, under social responsibility (with the members of the Cooperative, their families and the rural community of El Rosario) and a deep commitment to the species they sell, respecting the closures and quotas. Likewise, the members of this cooperative are leaders in the repopulation and conservation programs of banks of particular species, operating with an adequate combination of performance and value. The cooperative Ensenada has 3 main fishing fields: Punta Baja, La Lobera and Faro de San Jose.

The finfish fisheries in El Rosario, BC, are multi-specific and use multiple gears the most used are handlines and traps. Two of the most selective fishing gears that have a minimal impact on the habitats where it is used, however, this fishery can target a wide variety of fish, with very different life-history characteristics. The fishermen from the cooperative Ensenada are aware of the high pressure being exerted to the main species captured Ocean whitefish (C. princeps), California sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher), barred sand bass (P. nebulifer), starry rockfish (Sebastes constellatus) and vermilion rockfish (S. miniatus), in the BC peninsula in the last years and they are interested in developing a sustainable fishery to set an example in the region. Commercial harvest for these groups of fishes is conducted in small vessels using different fishing gears, hook and lines with live bait (sardine and mackerel) and traps in open seas and areas near the coast.

Unfortunately, there is a lack of biological and fishery information for this fishery in Mexico. In the National Fishery Chart (INAPESCA, 2010) the above-mentioned species are classified as coastal finfish. This group is composed of a large diversity of species, with different life cycles, including those that inhabit the coast and lagoons up to the border of the external continental shelf which can reach near 200 meters depth. This group is managed without short and long-term species-specific objectives. For this reason, the cooperative Ensenada approached Comunidad y Biodiversidad, A. C. (COBI) to ask for guidance on how to reach international fishery standards, in order to continue with the good practices applied and the sustainable use of the marine resources.

This FIP is going to a Comprehensive (2020-2024).

The Cooperative Ensenada is located on the west coast of the state of Baja California (BC) and has been active since 1940. Currently, this cooperative has 84 members and 159 people employed in the processing plant (129 men and 30 women) and has two concessions: abalone and red lobster. This cooperative serves the local and global market, under social responsibility (with the members of the Cooperative, their families and the rural community of El Rosario) and a deep commitment to the species they sell, respecting the closures and quotas.

FIP at a Glance

25% 25% 50%
December 01, 2017
50% 25% 25%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
May 2021
Target End Date
Dec 2024
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Comunidad y Biodiversidad, A.C.
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Alesa Flores
Phone 
+52 622 222 49 90
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
7305

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