Pot/Trap

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

Mexico’s Pacific Coast shrimp fishery is one of the country’s most important fisheries. It is first in terms of the commercial value of the harvest from the industrial and small-scale fleets, and generates the most jobs directly and indirectly (approximately 37,000) (SAGARPA, 2013). Marismas Nacionales Biosphere Reserve (MNBR) located in the state of Nayarit is the largest (~130,000 hectares) and most productive coastal wetland in the Mexican Pacific and represents 15% of the country's mangrove coverage (SEMARNAT-CONANP 2013).

Approximately 20 small-scale cooperatives hold permits and/or concessions to fish in 15 different areas in MNBR. Fishing activities are the main source of food and livelihood for local communities. The most important commercial species is the white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), with an average annual production of approximately 3,538 tons, during the fishing season which runs from September through March (Chavez-Herrera et al., 2020). This FIP will begin with the participation of three of the larger cooperatives, but other cooperatives will be invited to join as the benefits from engaging in the FIP become evident. The participating cooperatives – SCPP Ignlogar, SCPP Casa Cuna, and SCPP Llano del Tigre – include over 800 members and land over 1,000 tons of white shrimp per season. Each of these cooperatives has a concession with multiple fishing areas where they use two fishing gear types of fishing: cast nets and a trap style called "tapos", which are semi-fixed structures made with mangrove branches that enclose and concentrate shrimp and other species in a lagoon or estuary. Some of the cooperatives have repopulation and mangrove restoration areas, reflecting their commitment to improving their ecosystem. The three cooperatives have recorded significant decreases in their shrimp catch over the last three years and they recognize the need for better management and harvest practices.

Although the white shrimp fishery has a modified escapement strategy, seasonal closures, and monitoring programs, the most recent data shows a decreasing trend on catch levels (INAPESCA, 2018; INAPESCA, 2019). This indicates a need to strengthen data collection and the harvest strategy or have additional management measures in place. Therefore, the first objective of the FIP is to generate more information on the fishery and the ecosystem, reduce environmental deterioration, and transition towards responsible shrimp fishing practices that add value to the product and provide more benefits to communities. Much of the shrimp harvested by the cooperatives is directed to the informal, dehydrated shrimp market which adds very little value to the harvest. As part of the FIP activities, the cooperatives will receive support to transition to more formal market segments that value their fishery management efforts.

By the end of 2026, this FIP will work towards completing the following objectives:

1. Improve data collection for the white shrimp fishery in Marismas Nacionales, including information on catch per unit effort (CPUE) and by-catch.

2. With the participation of INAPESCA, academia, fisher cooperatives, and NGOs, co-develop a fishery management plan for the white shrimp fishery in MNBR.

 3. Improve fishing operations, including fishing practices, product management, and traceability of white shrimp fishery to access better-paying market segments that value sustainability.

 4. Improve the visibility of the role women play in the fishery and increase their opportunities to benefit from post-harvest activities.

5. Set the groundwork for the cooperatives to obtain the Fair Trade Certification.

6. Understand better the conservation status of the ecosystem to propose conservation and restoration practices that improve shrimp habitat and increase coastal resilience to extreme weather events.

Mexico’s Pacific Coast shrimp fishery is one of the country’s most important fisheries. It is first in terms of the commercial value of the harvest from the industrial and small-scale fleets, and generates the most jobs directly and indirectly (approximately 37,000) (SAGARPA, 2013). Marismas Nacionales Biosphere Reserve (MNBR) located in the state of Nayarit is the largest (~130,000 hectares) and most productive coastal wetland in the Mexican Pacific and represents 15% of the country's mangrove coverage (SEMARNAT-CONANP 2013).

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
SmartFish Rescate de Valor, AC
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Yuliesky Garcés Rodríguez
Phone 
(52) 612 148 8553
Organization Name 
The Nature Conservancy (TNC)
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Paulina Diaz
Phone 
(52) 646 137 2652
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
17371
Expiration Date 
January 2023

Overview

The Orkney Brown Crab fishery completed a 5-year FIP in 2017 and entered the MSC full assessment in 2018. During that assessment, it was noted that the fishery would fall short of the standard by 1 point in Principle 1 with a score of 79. The scores for principles 2 and 3 were above 80.  This is due to the current regulatory framework that the crab and all shellfish species are managed under in Scotland. For us to meet the MSC standard fully it is going to require a change in primary legislation. Due to this, the fishery withdrew from the full assessment process at the client draft report stage.

This continuation of the FIP for Orkney Brown Crab will ensure that we continue to meet the MSC standard for all the performance indicators that we met during the previous FIP and strive to score higher if possible in addition to increasing the scores for the performance indicators that scored under 80. 

Through industry engagement with fishers, processors, merchants, and retailers we hope to build on the work through this FIP to ensure biological, social, and economic sustainability for the fishery. 

The Orkney Brown Crab fishery completed a 5-year FIP in 2017 and entered the MSC full assessment in 2018. During that assessment, it was noted that the fishery would fall short of the standard by 1 point in Principle 1 with a score of 79. The scores for principles 2 and 3 were above 80.  This is due to the current regulatory framework that the crab and all shellfish species are managed under in Scotland.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Orkney Sustainable Fisheries Ltd
Organization Type 
Other
Primary Contact 
Kate Rydzkowski
Phone 
07527005025
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
15659

Overview

The white shrimp fishery in Central Java has been engaged in Fishery Improvement Projects since 2017 in collaboration with WWF-Indonesia under the Seafood Savers program. The program is also supported by Diponegoro University (UNDIP) as an academic entity, PUSRISKAN as the scientific authority, and other related stakeholders in the area.

The fishery is located in the Wedung area, Demak, in the Central Java of Indonesia, and part of FMA 712. Fishers in the supply chain use two methods to catch the white shrimp, trammel nets and traps. The fishing areas are next to the village and within 10 miles from the shore.

PT. Cassanatama also encouraged its suppliers to implement responsible and sustainable fishing practices and has written agreements with those suppliers as the proof of their commitments.

The white shrimp fishery in Central Java has been engaged in Fishery Improvement Projects since 2017 in collaboration with WWF-Indonesia under the Seafood Savers program. The program is also supported by Diponegoro University (UNDIP) as an academic entity, PUSRISKAN as the scientific authority, and other related stakeholders in the area.

FIP at a Glance

50% 36% 11% 4%
May 01, 2021
50% 36% 11% 4%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jan 2023
Target End Date
Apr 2026

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
PT. Cassanatama Naturindo
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Kandiyas
Phone 
082241004148
Organization Name 
Independent Consultant
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Heri
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
15427

Overview

This Comprehensive FIP is led by New Brunswick and Quebec Seafood Processors and Fishermen Associations who are actively involved in pilot and sea trial of new and emerging technologies for the reduction of entanglement of right whales in snow crab fishing gear in cfa 12 and surrounding areas. The North Atlantic right whale (NARW)‘s population has been declining since 2010. NARW mortalities can be caused by ship strikes and entanglement in fishing gear, especially in fixed gear such as pots. Since 2015, a higher number of NARW are migrating to the Gulf of St. Lawrence to feed during the summer and fall. Therefore, areas that traditionally posed no or little risk to NARW now must be considered as possible NARW habitat. This FIP will cover improvements to endangered, threatened, and protected (ETP) species impacts in the Gulf of St. Lawrence snow crab fishery to mitigate the risk to NARW and other ETP species, while maintaining a sustainable Canadian seafood industry. This FIP intends to cover all ETP species indicators in the MSC criteria (2.3.1, 2.3.2, 2.3.3).

Chionoecetes opilio CANADA | Gulf of St. Lawrence | Pot /Trap Gear

This Comprehensive FIP is led by New Brunswick and Quebec Seafood Processors and Fishermen Associations who are actively involved in pilot and sea trial of new and emerging technologies for the reduction of entanglement of right whales in snow crab fishing gear in cfa 12 and surrounding areas. The North Atlantic right whale (NARW)‘s population has been declining since 2010. NARW mortalities can be caused by ship strikes and entanglement in fishing gear, especially in fixed gear such as pots. Since 2015, a higher number of NARW are migrating to the Gulf of St.

FIP at a Glance

7% 93%
January 01, 2020
7% 93%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2022
Target End Date
Dec 2024
Additional Impacts:
Traceability

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
MKM GLOBAL
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Katherine Morissette
Phone 
5147011303
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
15389

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

Perupez, Sakana del Peru and Redes-Sostenibilidad Pesquera have signed a Memorandum of
Understanding (MOU) to design a FIP with the ultimate goal of achieving MSC certifiable status for the
common eel (Ophichthus remiger) fishery between the regions from Tumbes to Piura. This FIP has also received the
support of Sustainable Fisheries Partnership.

Fishing area: FAO 87 (Pacific, Southeast) Peru North. In Peru is distributed from 3º21´S to 12º´S, with
higher concentrations from the extreme north of the maritime domain of Peru and 07°00´ S.The fishing
áreas of the eel fleet are located in Tumbes (from Zorritos to the south of Punta Sal) and Piura (to the
north and south of Talara and from Paita to the south of Parachique), with extractive activity centered in
the province of Sechura-Piura region. However, the possibility of catching the resource from the fishing
permit, according to the Eel Regulation Ordinance Fishing, is not limited to this area, but encompasses
the entire Peruvian maritime area.
Fishing fleet: The fleet dedicated to the capture of eel is composed of 18 fishing boats ranging in length from 5.18 meters to 16.72 meters. The fleet dedicated to the extraction of the eel resource is
made up of fishing boats equipped with starboard fishing maneuvers (fiberglass: constructed in Japanese
shipyards and wooden). Every vessel has electroacoustics equipment, an echosounder, a VHF radio transmitter-receiver,
as well as a magnetic compass (IMARPE, 1993). These fishery boats generally carry an average
of 800 traps per boat and have the capacity to receive between 1 and 3 TM of raw material.

Perupez, Sakana del Peru and Redes-Sostenibilidad Pesquera have signed a Memorandum of
Understanding (MOU) to design a FIP with the ultimate goal of achieving MSC certifiable status for the
common eel (Ophichthus remiger) fishery between the regions from Tumbes to Piura. This FIP has also received the
support of Sustainable Fisheries Partnership.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Perupez
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Dario Magno Alvites Diestra
Phone 
+51 999 748 185
Organization Name 
Sakana del Perú
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Hara Yasushi
Organization Name 
Redes-Sostenibilidad Pesquera
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Jorge de Jesús Grillo Núñez
Phone 
+51 950 273 593
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
15374

Overview

This FIP includes the commercial pot fishery used to capture Dungeness crab along the Oregon coast.  An MSC pre-assessment completed in 2018 concluded that the coastwide Dungeness crab stock is in healthy condition and the three-S input controls (season, size and sex limits) appear to be appropriate for the stock. Oregon has developed a limit reference point and the ability to take management actions based on that limit. However, the Dungeness crab stock includes coastal waters off California and Washington and those states do not have biologically meaningful reference points. The pre-assessment concluded that the fishery could proceed to full assessment, but would have a much greater likelihood of success if Oregon worked in collaboration with one or more of the other coastal states toward common harvest control rules and reference points to effectively control exploitation of the stock if necessary. Oregon has been in discussions with Washington about preparing to enter MSC assessment (including developing reference points and management strategies). There seems to be some interest in doing so but no immediate actions are being taken in Washington or California. As Oregon continues to work with the other states, they are interested in continuing to make improvements where they can through a Basic FIP. 

This FIP includes the commercial pot fishery used to capture Dungeness crab along the Oregon coast.  An MSC pre-assessment completed in 2018 concluded that the coastwide Dungeness crab stock is in healthy condition and the three-S input controls (season, size and sex limits) appear to be appropriate for the stock. Oregon has developed a limit reference point and the ability to take management actions based on that limit. However, the Dungeness crab stock includes coastal waters off California and Washington and those states do not have biologically meaningful reference points.

FIP at a Glance

43% 50% 7%
August 01, 2020
50% 43% 7%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

B Good Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Aug 2022
Target End Date
Aug 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
ForSea Solutions LLC
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Natasha Novikova
Phone 
+19713319612
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
14029

Overview

The national-level Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP led by ADI will merge three site-level basic snapper-grouper FIPs (Aru, Makassar Strait, and Java Sea) and is aiming to develop solutions for snapper and grouper fishery management and other issues that can only be addressed effectively at the national level and thus will support the work of existing FIPs.

This FIP will be a comprehensive FIP and will address the objectives originally outlined in three basic FIPs as well as additional issues identified in the MSC Pre-Assessment produced by The Nature Conservancy to support the TNC Indonesia deepwater groundfish - dropline, longline, trap and gillnet FIP.   The ADI-led Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP is aligned and a complementary effort to the TNC-led snapper grouper FIP.

This FIP will focus on six snapper species (Lutjanus malabaricus, L. eryphtropterus, L. sebae, Pristipmoides multidens, P. typus and Pinjalo pinjalo) and 10 grouper species caught in Indonesian Waters (WPPs) using bottom longline, drop line, trap and gillnet.

 

The national-level Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP led by ADI will merge three site-level basic snapper-grouper FIPs (Aru, Makassar Strait, and Java Sea) and is aiming to develop solutions for snapper and grouper fishery management and other issues that can only be addressed effectively at the national level and thus will support the work of existing FIPs.

FIP at a Glance

32% 14% 54%
June 01, 2020
32% 14% 54%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Aug 2022
Target End Date
Jun 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Indonesian Demersal Association (ADI)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
M. Novi Saputra
Phone 
+62-31-99540949
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
13955

Overview

Note: FIP moved to inactive on May 17th, 2022.

The Canada Newfoundland and Labrador Lobster Pot FIP was initially started by Quin Sea Fisheries Limited of St. John’s, NL and has since been adopted for implementation and financial management by the Association of Seafood Producers (ASP) of Newfoundland and Labrador, also of St. John’s, NL. ASP is an association comprised of numerous lobster buyers, live traders, and producers.  ASP is also intricately involved in production and marketing of several other commercial species within the province.

Interested ASP member companies, as FIP participants, will collaborate with the regulator, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), to align and improve the fishery’s management and science with the ultimate objective of achieving Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) fishery sustainability certification.

The FIP intends to address all fishing practices in the legally permitted pot fishery for American lobster (Homarus americanus) in Lobster Fishing Areas 3 - 14, which operates in the waters surrounding the island of Newfoundland, completely within Canadian EEZ waters.

The fishery dates back to the 1870s and is localized and happens from small open boats during an 8-10 week spring fishing season. Traps are set close to shore, at depths generally less than 20 m. Fishing effort is controlled through restrictive licensing and daily trap limits. Regulations prohibit the harvest of undersized (i.e. <82.5 mm carapace length) and ovigerous animals. In addition, there is a voluntary practice called v-notching, which involves cutting a shallow mark in the tail fan of an ovigerous female. The mark is retained for at least 2-3 molts and notched females cannot be retained in the fishery. The practice thus serves to protect proven spawners even when they are not carrying eggs externally. The number of licenses is currently around 2,450 and trap limits range from 100 to 300 depending on the Lobster Fishing Area (DFO 2016).

Note: FIP moved to inactive on May 17th, 2022.

The Canada Newfoundland and Labrador Lobster Pot FIP was initially started by Quin Sea Fisheries Limited of St. John’s, NL and has since been adopted for implementation and financial management by the Association of Seafood Producers (ASP) of Newfoundland and Labrador, also of St. John’s, NL. ASP is an association comprised of numerous lobster buyers, live traders, and producers.  ASP is also intricately involved in production and marketing of several other commercial species within the province.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Association of Seafood Producers
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Peter Norsworthy
Phone 
(902) 497-4134
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
13400

Overview

El FIP de langosta roja de Baja California (también conocida como langosta espinosa de California) de México se está implementando para obtener la certificación del MSC Fisheries Standard. El interés de implementar este FIP surgió a partir del proyecto Fish for Good del MSC, cuyos resultados identificaron el potencial de la pesquería de langosta roja en la costa oeste de Baja California, México para entrar en un proceso de mejora pesquera. Como parte de las etapas iniciales de este FIP, la pesquería también está ingresando al programa ITM (En Transición a la Certificación MSC) del MSC.

La población objetivo se extiende desde la frontera entre EE. UU. y México hasta la isla de Cedros a lo largo de la costa occidental de Baja California. El stock del sur ya se encuentra en una pesquería certificada por el MSC, por lo que existe la posibilidad de que ambos stocks puedan ser en el futuro la misma Unidad de Certificación (UoC). La flota está formada por pescadores autorizados y registrados en Baja California, que operan embarcaciones menores con trampas de alambre, organizados en cooperativas pesqueras.

Los actores de la FIP son estas cooperativas pesqueras, los gobiernos federal y estatal, un consultor independiente y una ONG. Estas partes interesadas desarrollaron un plan de trabajo para cumplir con las recomendaciones de mejora de la evaluación previa del MSC para lograr un estado de pesca sostenible para fines de 2024.

El FIP de langosta roja está siendo implementado para obtener la certificación para pesquerías sostenibles del MSC. El interés de implementar este FIP surgió del proyecto denominado Fish for Good del MSC, en cuyos resultados se identificó el potencial de la pesquería de langosta roja en la costa occidental de Baja California, México para entrar en un proceso de mejora pesquera. Como parte de las etapas iniciales de este FIP, la pesquería además está entrando en el programa ITM (In Transition to MSC certifcation) del MSC.

El stock objetivo va desde la frontera entre Estados Unidos y México hasta Isla de Cedros a lo largo de la costa occidental de Baja California. El stock ubicado al sur corresponde a la pesquería ya está certificado con el estándar del MSC, por lo que existe la posibilidad de que ambos stocks puedan ser en el futuro la misma Unidad de Certificación (UoC). La flota cuenta con pescadores autorizados y registrados en Baja California, operando embarcaciones pequeñas con trampas de alambre, organizados en cooperativas pesqueras.

Los participantes del FIP son estas cooperativas pesqueras, gobiernos federal y estatal, un consultor independiente y OSC. Quienes desarrollaron un plan de trabajo para cumplir con las recomendaciones de mejoras como resultado de la preevaluación del MSC, para lograr un estado de pesquería sostenible para fines de 2024.

El FIP de langosta roja de Baja California (también conocida como langosta espinosa de California) de México se está implementando para obtener la certificación del MSC Fisheries Standard.

FIP at a Glance

54% 43% 4%
January 01, 2020
54% 43% 4%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

D Some Past Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2022
Target End Date
Dec 2024
Additional Impacts:
Traceability

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Pronatura Noroeste A.C.
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Pablo Alvarez
Phone 
+52 646 128 2459
Organization Name 
CONAPESCA
Organization Type 
Other
Primary Contact 
Tania Nassar
Organization Name 
Pronatura Noroeste A.C.
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Gabriela Ehuan
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
12856

Overview

The small-scale and artisanal lobster fisheries of Belize began in the mid-to-late 1950s, with species harvested mainly for export to the United States. Today, the fisheries sector contributes significantly to the economy of Belize, ranking 5th in export earnings in 2015. Spiny lobster and queen conch are the most productive capture fisheries, with more than 90 percent of catch exported to the U.S. The Belize spiny lobster stock is part of a larger target stock that ranges from North Carolina to Brazil including Bermuda, the Gulf of Mexico, West Indies and Caribbean. 

Fishermen harvest lobster and conch from the shallow waters of the barrier reef and offshore atolls using two types of vessels: small wooden sailboats and fiberglass skiffs. Sailboat fishers often fish for six to ten days and carry approximately eight dugout canoes and up to ten fishers, who free-dive and collect conch and lobster by hand using a hook stick. Fishers using skiffs are at sea for varying periods of time, usually two to three days and at times up to a week. Skiff fishers generally use traps or shades (casitas) to attract lobster and harvest using either hand, hook stick, noose/lasso or jamo net. The fleet pursuing the stock that will be part of the FIP is defined as fishers legally licensed by the Belize Fisheries Department and are members of the National Fishermen Cooperative or Northen Fishing Cooperative in Belize. 

 National Fishermen Cooperative and Northern Cooperative are the two largest fishing cooperatives in Belize, representing approximately 80 percent of Belize’s 2700+ commercial fishers combined.  These Co-ops and two private companies are currently the only entities allowed to export lobster, with an average of 500,000 lbs of lobster tails are exported annually. According to Belizean law, the fishing cooperatives are required to sell 5% of their lobster to local markets. The rest is exported, mainly to the U.S. 

The small-scale and artisanal lobster fisheries of Belize began in the mid-to-late 1950s, with species harvested mainly for export to the United States. Today, the fisheries sector contributes significantly to the economy of Belize, ranking 5th in export earnings in 2015. Spiny lobster and queen conch are the most productive capture fisheries, with more than 90 percent of catch exported to the U.S. The Belize spiny lobster stock is part of a larger target stock that ranges from North Carolina to Brazil including Bermuda, the Gulf of Mexico, West Indies and Caribbean. 

FIP at a Glance

14% 29% 57%
November 01, 2019
14% 36% 50%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jan 2023
Target End Date
Nov 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Future of Fish
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Momo Kochen
Organization Name 
The Nature Conservancy Belize
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
James Foley
Phone 
+5016354989
Organization Name 
National Fishermen's Producers Cooperative Society Ltd.
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Elmer Rodriguez
Organization Name 
Northern Fishermen Cooperative Society Ltd
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Bobby Usher
Phone 
+501 227-8039
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
12487

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