Pot/Trap

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

This Prospective FIP is led by New Brunswick and Quebec Seafood Processors and Fishermen Associations who are actively involved in pilot and sea trial of new and emerging technologies for the reduction of entanglement of right whales in snow crab fishing gear in cfa 12 and surrounding areas.

The North Atlantic right whale (NARW)‘s population has been declining since 2010. NARW mortalities can be caused by ship strikes and entanglement in fishing gear, especially in fixed gear such as pots. 

Since 2015, a higher number of NARW are migrating to the Gulf of St. Lawrence to feed during the summer and fall. Therefore, areas that traditionally posed no or little risk to NARW now must be considered as possible NARW habitat. 

This  FIP will cover improvements to endangered, threatened, and protected (ETP) species impacts in the Gulf of St. Lawrence snow crab fishery to mitigate the risk to NARW and other ETP species, while maintaining a sustainable Canadian seafood industry. 

This FIP intends to cover all ETP species indicators in the MSC criteria (2.3.1, 2.3.2, 2.3.3).

Chionoecetes opilio CANADA  |  Gulf of St. Lawrence |  Pot /Trap Gear

This Prospective FIP is led by New Brunswick and Quebec Seafood Processors and Fishermen Associations who are actively involved in pilot and sea trial of new and emerging technologies for the reduction of entanglement of right whales in snow crab fishing gear in cfa 12 and surrounding areas.

The North Atlantic right whale (NARW)‘s population has been declining since 2010. NARW mortalities can be caused by ship strikes and entanglement in fishing gear, especially in fixed gear such as pots. 

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
MKM GLOBAL
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Katherine Morissette
Phone 
5147011303
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
14074
Expiration Date 
June 2021

Overview

This FIP includes the commercial pot fishery used to capture Dungeness crab along the Oregon coast.  An MSC pre-assessment completed in 2018 concluded that the coastwide Dungeness crab stock is in healthy condition and the three-S input controls (season, size and sex limits) appear to be appropriate for the stock. Oregon has developed a limit reference point and the ability to take management actions based on that limit. However, the Dungeness crab stock includes coastal waters off California and Washington and those states do not have biologically meaningful reference points. The pre-assessment concluded that the fishery could proceed to full assessment, but would have a much greater likelihood of success if Oregon worked in collaboration with one or more of the other coastal states toward common harvest control rules and reference points to effectively control exploitation of the stock if necessary. Oregon has been in discussions with Washington about preparing to enter MSC assessment (including developing reference points and management strategies). There seems to be some interest in doing so but no immediate actions are being taken in Washington or California. As Oregon continues to work with the other states, they are interested in continuing to make improvements where they can through a Basic FIP. 

This FIP includes the commercial pot fishery used to capture Dungeness crab along the Oregon coast.  An MSC pre-assessment completed in 2018 concluded that the coastwide Dungeness crab stock is in healthy condition and the three-S input controls (season, size and sex limits) appear to be appropriate for the stock. Oregon has developed a limit reference point and the ability to take management actions based on that limit. However, the Dungeness crab stock includes coastal waters off California and Washington and those states do not have biologically meaningful reference points.

FIP at a Glance

50% 43% 7%
August 01, 2020
50% 43% 7%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Feb 2021
Target End Date
Aug 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
ForSea Solutions LLC
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Natasha Novikova
Phone 
+19713319612
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
14029

Overview

The national-level Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP led by ADI will merge three site-level basic snapper-grouper FIPs (Aru, Makassar Strait, and Java Sea) and is aiming to develop solutions for snapper and grouper fishery management and other issues that can only be addressed effectively at the national level and thus will support the work of existing FIPs.

This FIP will be a comprehensive FIP and will address the objectives originally outlined in three basic FIPs as well as additional issues identified in the MSC Pre-Assessment produced by The Nature Conservancy to support the TNC Indonesia deepwater groundfish - dropline, longline, trap and gillnet FIP.   The ADI-led Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP is aligned and a complementary effort to the TNC-led snapper grouper FIP.

This FIP will focus on six snapper species (Lutjanus malabaricus, L. eryphtropterus, L. sebae, Pristipmoides multidens, P. typus and Pinjalo pinjalo) and 10 grouper species caught in Indonesian Waters (WPPs) using bottom longline, drop line, trap and gillnet.

 

The national-level Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP led by ADI will merge three site-level basic snapper-grouper FIPs (Aru, Makassar Strait, and Java Sea) and is aiming to develop solutions for snapper and grouper fishery management and other issues that can only be addressed effectively at the national level and thus will support the work of existing FIPs.

FIP at a Glance

32% 14% 54%
June 01, 2020
32% 14% 54%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Feb 2021
Target End Date
Jun 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Indonesian Demersal Association (ADI)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
M. Novi Saputra
Phone 
+62-31-99540949
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
13955

Overview

The Canada Newfoundland and Labrador Lobster Pot FIP was initially started by Quin Sea Fisheries Limited of St. John’s, NL and has since been adopted for implementation and financial management by the Association of Seafood Producers (ASP) of Newfoundland and Labrador, also of St. John’s, NL. ASP is an association comprised of numerous lobster buyers, live traders, and producers.  ASP is also intricately involved in production and marketing of several other commercial species within the province.

Interested ASP member companies, as FIP participants, will collaborate with the regulator, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), to align and improve the fishery’s management and science with the ultimate objective of achieving Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) fishery sustainability certification.

The FIP intends to address all fishing practices in the legally permitted pot fishery for American lobster (Homarus americanus) in Lobster Fishing Areas 3 - 14, which operates in the waters surrounding the island of Newfoundland, completely within Canadian EEZ waters.

The fishery dates back to the 1870s and is localized and happens from small open boats during an 8-10 week spring fishing season. Traps are set close to shore, at depths generally less than 20 m. Fishing effort is controlled through restrictive licensing and daily trap limits. Regulations prohibit the harvest of undersized (i.e. <82.5 mm carapace length) and ovigerous animals. In addition, there is a voluntary practice called v-notching, which involves cutting a shallow mark in the tail fan of an ovigerous female. The mark is retained for at least 2-3 molts and notched females cannot be retained in the fishery. The practice thus serves to protect proven spawners even when they are not carrying eggs externally. The number of licenses is currently around 2,450 and trap limits range from 100 to 300 depending on the Lobster Fishing Area (DFO 2016).

The Canada Newfoundland and Labrador Lobster Pot FIP was initially started by Quin Sea Fisheries Limited of St. John’s, NL and has since been adopted for implementation and financial management by the Association of Seafood Producers (ASP) of Newfoundland and Labrador, also of St. John’s, NL. ASP is an association comprised of numerous lobster buyers, live traders, and producers.  ASP is also intricately involved in production and marketing of several other commercial species within the province.

FIP at a Glance

39% 57% 4%
March 01, 2020
39% 57% 4%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Oct 2020
Target End Date
Mar 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Association of Seafood Producers
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Peter Norsworthy
Phone 
(902) 497-4134
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
13400

Overview

The Mexico Baja California red rock lobster (also known as California spiny lobster) FIP is being implemented to obtain the certification for MSC Fisheries Standard. The interest of implementing this FIP arose from the project Fish for Good of the MSC, whose results identified the potential of the red rock lobster fishery on the west coast of Baja California, Mexico to enter in a process of fishing improvement. As part of the initial stages of this FIP, the fishery is also entering the ITM (In Transition to MSC Certification) program of the MSC.

The target stock is ranging from the US-Mexico border to Cedros Island along the western coast of Baja California. The southern stock is already in an MSC certified fishery, thus there is a possibility that both stocks could be in the future the same Unit of Certification (UoC). The fleet is licensed and registered fishermen in Baja California, operating small vessels with wire traps, organized in fishing cooperatives.

The FIP stakeholders are these fishing cooperatives, federal and state governments, an independent consultant and an NGO. These stakeholders developed a work plan to meet the improvement recommendations from the MSC pre-assessment to achieve a sustainable fishery status by the end of 2024.

El FIP de langosta roja está siendo implementado para obtener la certificación para pesquerías sostenibles del MSC. El interés de implementar este FIP surgió del proyecto denominado Fish for Good del MSC, en cuyos resultados se identificó el potencial de la pesquería de langosta roja en la costa occidental de Baja California, México para entrar en un proceso de mejora pesquera. Como parte de las etapas iniciales de este FIP, la pesquería además está entrando en el programa ITM (In Transition to MSC certifcation) del MSC.

El stock objetivo va desde la frontera entre Estados Unidos y México hasta Isla de Cedros a lo largo de la costa occidental de Baja California. El stock ubicado al sur corresponde a la pesquería ya certificada con el estándar del MSC, por lo que existe la posibilidad de que ambos stocks puedan ser en el futuro la misma Unidad de Certificación (UoC). La flota cuenta con pescadores autorizados y registrados en Baja California, operando embarcaciones pequeñas con trampas de alambre, organizados en cooperativas pesqueras.

Los participantes del FIP son estas cooperativas pesqueras, gobiernos federal y estatal, un consultor independiente y OSC. Quienes desarrollaron un plan de trabajo para cumplir con las recomendaciones de mejoras como resultado de la preevaluación del MSC, para lograr un estado de pesquería sostenible para fines de 2024.

The Mexico Baja California red rock lobster (also known as California spiny lobster) FIP is being implemented to obtain the certification for MSC Fisheries Standard. The interest of implementing this FIP arose from the project Fish for Good of the MSC, whose results identified the potential of the red rock lobster fishery on the west coast of Baja California, Mexico to enter in a process of fishing improvement.

FIP at a Glance

54% 43% 4%
January 01, 2020
54% 43% 4%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2020
Target End Date
Dec 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Pronatura Noroeste A.C.
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Pablo Alvarez
Phone 
+52 646 128 2459
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
12856

Overview

The small-scale and artisanal lobster fisheries of Belize began in the mid-to-late 1950s, with species harvested mainly for export to the United States. Today, the fisheries sector contributes significantly to the economy of Belize, ranking 5th in export earnings in 2015. Spiny lobster and queen conch are the most productive capture fisheries, with more than 90 percent of catch exported to the U.S. The Belize spiny lobster stock is part of a larger target stock that ranges from North Carolina to Brazil including Bermuda, the Gulf of Mexico, West Indies and Caribbean. 

Fishermen harvest lobster and conch from the shallow waters of the barrier reef and offshore atolls using two types of vessels: small wooden sailboats and fiberglass skiffs. Sailboat fishers often fish for six to ten days and carry approximately eight dugout canoes and up to ten fishers, who free-dive and collect conch and lobster by hand using a hook stick. Fishers using skiffs are at sea for varying periods of time, usually two to three days and at times up to a week. Skiff fishers generally use traps or shades (casitas) to attract lobster and harvest using either hand, hook stick, noose/lasso or jamo net. The fleet pursuing the stock that will be part of the FIP is defined as fishers legally licensed by the Belize Fisheries Department and are members of the National Fishermen Cooperative or Northen Fishing Cooperative in Belize. 

 National Fishermen Cooperative and Northern Cooperative are the two largest fishing cooperatives in Belize, representing approximately 80 percent of Belize’s 2700+ commercial fishers combined.  These Co-ops and two private companies are currently the only entities allowed to export lobster, with an average of 500,000 lbs of lobster tails are exported annually. According to Belizean law, the fishing cooperatives are required to sell 5% of their lobster to local markets. The rest is exported, mainly to the U.S. 

The small-scale and artisanal lobster fisheries of Belize began in the mid-to-late 1950s, with species harvested mainly for export to the United States. Today, the fisheries sector contributes significantly to the economy of Belize, ranking 5th in export earnings in 2015. Spiny lobster and queen conch are the most productive capture fisheries, with more than 90 percent of catch exported to the U.S. The Belize spiny lobster stock is part of a larger target stock that ranges from North Carolina to Brazil including Bermuda, the Gulf of Mexico, West Indies and Caribbean. 

FIP at a Glance

14% 36% 50%
November 01, 2019
14% 36% 50%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jul 2020
Target End Date
Nov 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Future of Fish
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Marah Hardt
Phone 
+12032935590
Organization Name 
The Nature Conservancy Belize
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Julie Robinson
Phone 
+5016104903
Organization Name 
National Fishermen's Producers Cooperative Society Ltd.
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Elmer Rodriguez
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
12487

Overview

The blue crab resource supports North Carolina’s second most valuable commercial fishery. Average North Carolina hard crab landings since 1994 are 40 million pounds with an average dockside value of $28 million annually (NCDMF 2013), consistently ranking North Carolina in the top four blue crab harvesting states in the US. Coastal Heritage Seafood is a commercial buyer and processor of North Carolina blue crab, accounting for approximately 15% of the fishery production each year. It is their interest to pursue a comprehensive FIP with the goal of MSC certification.

Measured against the MSC standard, the fishery in its current state scores well in two of three principles surrounding management and impacts on the surrounding environment/other species. The fishery boasts an excellent state management system that collects both fishery dependent and independent data, as well as a robust fishery management plan with a harvest strategy. The fishery also demonstrates an exceptionally clean catch, with 99% of the catch being hard shell crab. The remaining 1% of the catch include blue crabs known as soft shell, peelers, and non-target species includes at least ten different finfish species and occasionally a diamondback terrapin, a species of concern (and the primary driver behind Monterey Bay Seafood Watch red Avoid rating).

However, the MSC principle focusing on target stock status and harvest strategy is the current weak point of the fishery when measured against the MSC standard, as at the time of pre-assessment based on 2015 stock statistics, the stock appears to be depleted as both the adult and recruits have fallen below the state’s levels of 75% abundance and production since 2012The current state management protocol does not include traditional reference points for the determination of overfishing or being overfished, nor does it provide the opportunity to evaluate the potential effectiveness of a management action that may potentially improve stock abundance. Because there is no independent observer program for the NC blue crab pot fishery, there are no recent data that can be used to characterize catch composition, including documenting interactions with species of concern.

At present time, the North Carolina blue crab pot fishery does not meet MSC standards with respect to the abundance of the target species, and because of the lack of an analytical model for stock assessment, it is impossible to evaluate the effectiveness of management measures to rebuild the stock.

The NC DMF has completed, with effective peer review, an analytical model for stock assessment that will allow for the following: better understanding of blue crab population dynamics in NC waters, the development of reference points, the evaluation of current stock status and fishing mortality against those reference points, and the evaluation of potential stock rebuilding strategies, if needed. In addition, NC Division of Marine Fisheries is planning to develop and implement a harvest strategy in accordance with the new assessment model.

The fishery does not completely meet the MSC standards for commitment to the principles to and implementation of the precautionary approach (PA). Developed by the FAO (e.g., FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries) in 1995, the PA seeks to protect fishery resources from fishing practices which might put their long-term viability in jeopardy. As adopted in the MSC standard, the PA means being cautious when information is uncertain, unreliable or inadequate and that the absence of adequate scientific information shall not be used as a reason for postponing or failing to take conservation and management measures. The pre-assessment identified that the North Carolina management system did not explicitly incorporate the elements of the PA into the fishery management policy. Upon review for this FIP, the FIP team determined that decision making for the blue crab fishery did not demonstrate evidence of using the PA.

The blue crab resource supports North Carolina’s second most valuable commercial fishery. Average North Carolina hard crab landings since 1994 are 40 million pounds with an average dockside value of $28 million annually (NCDMF 2013), consistently ranking North Carolina in the top four blue crab harvesting states in the US. Coastal Heritage Seafood is a commercial buyer and processor of North Carolina blue crab, accounting for approximately 15% of the fishery production each year. It is their interest to pursue a comprehensive FIP with the goal of MSC certification.

FIP at a Glance

11% 14% 75%
August 01, 2019
11% 14% 75%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Aug 2020
Target End Date
Aug 2023

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Coastal Heritage Seafood
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Tara Carawan
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
8500

Overview

The blue swimming crab (Callinectes bellicosus) fishery from the Puerto Peñasco – Puerto Lobos coastal corridor (Sonora, Mexico; 399 boats and 207 official fishing permits) produces on average 1.2 thousand tons/year, with metallic mesh Chesapeake traps (typically 90 traps/boat).

In its present condition and according to the Marine Stewardship Council Standard, 48 percent of the performance indicators for the fishery are “GREEN” (stock rebuilding capacity; information and monitoring for management; stock assessment; ETP species; habitat information and management; ecosystem information and outcome; legal framework; and consultation, roles and responsibilities). 36 percent of its indicators are “YELLOW” because: i) stock assessment should yet recognize extractions from illegal fishing effort (as big as the legal effort at the present) and mortality induced by industrial shrimp trawling; ii) fisheries ordination opportunities and fisheries refuges must be operative for reducing present mortality levels by 10 percent; iii) the management plan must recognize stock reference points; iv) responsible fishing operations and low bycatch rates must be endorsed by onboard observers; vi) impacts of biomass removals of snail, sand bass and triggerfish as bycatch of the swimming crab fishery must be dimensioned; vii) ghost fishing related to lost and abandoned crab traps must be assessed and eliminated. 16 percent of the fishery indicators are “RED” because: i) the fishery management plan lacks management objectives, population reference points, action plan, as well as agreed evaluation mechanisms and decision-making processes; ii) surveillance programs deterring poaching are missing.

During the first year, CEDO will implement a technical work plan for improving the commercial fishing operations of S.C.P.P. Ejidal Bahía San Jorge. CEDO and the Rillito Park Heirloom Farmers Market will collaborate prospecting and addressing additional funding for the FIP development. The core group will communicate and promote improvements to the official management plan among INAPESCA, CONAPESCA, and other local and regional organized fishers.

The technical work plan consists of: i) the operation of a season-round (2019-2020) and community-based fishery monitoring program; ii) the operation of onboard and land-based swimming crab fishery bycatch monitoring programs; iii) the undertaking of catch efficiency and selectivity trials with different baits; iv) the mitigation of ghost fishing by derelict swimming crab traps; v) the undertaking of cost-benefit assessments for the use of degradable clips in the construction of swimming crab traps; vi) the design and implementation of a wastes management and re-use plan for the swimming crab fishery; vii) the undertaking of biologic monitoring and detailed physical characterization of potential fishery refuges and viii) the continuous promotion of the FIP among INAPESCA, CONAPESCA and other local and regional organized fishers. Catch traceability options for the fishery will be additionally prospected. This work plan aims for the improvement of all 13 fishery performance indicators scored as yellow and red and implies the direct investment of USD $79,946 during the first year.

The blue swimming crab (Callinectes bellicosus) fishery from the Puerto Peñasco – Puerto Lobos coastal corridor (Sonora, Mexico; 399 boats and 207 official fishing permits) produces on average 1.2 thousand tons/year, with metallic mesh Chesapeake traps (typically 90 traps/boat).

FIP at a Glance

7% 39% 43% 11%
April 01, 2019
14% 32% 43% 11%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Oct 2020
Target End Date
Apr 2022
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Intercultural Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans (CEDO)
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Nelida Barajas
Email 
Phone 
+51 638 382 0113
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
10491

Overview

Project UK Fisheries Improvements (PUKFI) is working towards an environmentally sustainable future for UK fisheries by running Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs) on eight UK fisheries that have been selected by the UK supply chain. They were selected due to their importance for the UK market.

Nephrops are a commpercially important species of crustacean distributed throughout the northeast Atlantic from Iceland and the western coast of Norway in the north to the Atlantic coast of Morocco and the western and central Mediterranean. They are found predominantly in muddy sediment in which they build complex burrow systems, at depths of between 20 and 800m. Although they have a wide geographical range, there is no clear evidence of any significant migration between populations.

Total Annual Catch (TAC) quotas are set for each of the three ICES management divisions that overlay the Fishery, with total 2018 TAC set at 65,738t. Of this TAC, the West of Scotland, Irish Sea and North Sea Nehrops landed 42,622t (North Sea: 21,237t; West of Scotland: 11,842t; Irish Sea: 9,543t). Nephrops are predominantly landed by demersal trawl gear, accounting for 95% of landings, with the other 5% landed by creels. Scottish-registered vessels account for 67% of landings by weight, followed by Irish-registered vessels (27%) and English-registered vessels (6%).

Project UK Fisheries Improvements (PUKFI) is working towards an environmentally sustainable future for UK fisheries by running Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs) on eight UK fisheries that have been selected by the UK supply chain. They were selected due to their importance for the UK market.

FIP at a Glance

18% 46% 36%
May 01, 2019
18% 46% 36%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jan 2021
Target End Date
Apr 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Facilitated by the Marine Stewardship Council
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Jo Pollett
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
10348

Overview

An octopus FIP is being carried out in the Gulf of California, Mexico with the main objective of making the fishery sustainable. This fishery covers the region known as Bahia de Los Angeles (BLA), inside natural protected areas. The octopus fishery is the most important for the local community and the fishermen have traditionally caught the octopus by gleaning, free diving and using traps. The catch of octopus in BLA represents the 90% of the total octopus catch in Baja California State and it is a fishery with high value and great potential for commercialization.

An octopus FIP is being carried out in the Gulf of California, Mexico with the main objective of making the fishery sustainable. This fishery covers the region known as Bahia de Los Angeles (BLA), inside natural protected areas. The octopus fishery is the most important for the local community and the fishermen have traditionally caught the octopus by gleaning, free diving and using traps. The catch of octopus in BLA represents the 90% of the total octopus catch in Baja California State and it is a fishery with high value and great potential for commercialization.

FIP at a Glance

January 01, 2018
25% 21% 21% 32%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2020
Target End Date
Dec 2022
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Pronatura Noroeste A.C.
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Pablo Alvarez
Phone 
+526461753461 ext. 110
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
9158

Pages

Subscribe to Pot/Trap