Area 77 (Pacific, Eastern Central)

Overview

The Eastern Pacific Ocean swordfish - longline FIP is designed to improve the fishery by supporting progress toward the global standard for sustainable fisheries of the Marine Stewardship Council program. The fishery is governed by the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC). The swordfish is caught by vessels flagged to Panama and Vanuatu. Project hosts are Fong Hsiang and SYM-PAC.

The Eastern Pacific Ocean swordfish - longline FIP is designed to improve the fishery by supporting progress toward the global standard for sustainable fisheries of the Marine Stewardship Council program. The fishery is governed by the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC). The swordfish is caught by vessels flagged to Panama and Vanuatu. Project hosts are Fong Hsiang and SYM-PAC.

FIP at a Glance

11% 68% 21%
October 01, 2020
11% 68% 21%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

Not yet available
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
May 2022
Target End Date
Dec 2022

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
The Sustainability Incubator
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Katrina Nakamura
Organization Name 
Fong Hsiang Enterprise
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Jochanan Liew
Organization Name 
SYM-PAC International
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Jason Yabiku
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
16442

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

The shrimp fishery is the most economically important in Sinaloa, and the shrimp fishing season occurs from September to March. Since the early 1960s, the Sinaloa shrimp fishery has been closed from April through August.  Small-scale fisheries generally use fiberglass skiffs known as “pangas” to catch shrimp. Managers report that the Gulf of California harbors about 29,000 pangas officially registered for small-scale fisheries, 82% of which are found in the northwest Mexican Pacific coast, including Sinaloa with ~11,000 of these pangas. Producers in the northern region use both trawl nets and gillnets to target blue shrimp.

According to managers, the shrimp resource has been at its maximum sustainable yield in recent years. Current management strategy is composed of a series of measures that include: closed seasons (normally between April and August), designated fishing areas, and restrictions on gear. These management practices as a whole are designed to maintain the reproductive biomass and avoid an increase in the fishing effort. However, some uncertainties related to the status of the stock and the effectiveness of the management strategies remain unclear. Similarly, the specific impacts of the drift gillnet and trawl systems on the ecosystem are not quite well defined. This FIP aims to help to generate information to assess and mitigate potential impacts of the fishery, to work with fishers and managers to improve the data used to assess the status of the stocks, and participate actively in the review of the regulatory framework.

The shrimp fishery is the most economically important in Sinaloa, and the shrimp fishing season occurs from September to March. Since the early 1960s, the Sinaloa shrimp fishery has been closed from April through August.  Small-scale fisheries generally use fiberglass skiffs known as “pangas” to catch shrimp. Managers report that the Gulf of California harbors about 29,000 pangas officially registered for small-scale fisheries, 82% of which are found in the northwest Mexican Pacific coast, including Sinaloa with ~11,000 of these pangas.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Del Pacifico Seafoods
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Ruben Castro
Organization Name 
Del Pacifico Seafoods
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Iván Pérez
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
16282
Expiration Date 
August 2022

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

The shrimp fishery is one of the most economically important fisheries in Mexico. Sonora is the largest producer of shrimp from aquaculture and the second-largest producer of wild harvested shrimp in the country. Several important fishing grounds are located in places like Kino Bay or Bahia de Lobos. In the region, both industrial and small-scale producers operate targeting both brown and blue shrimp, with the small-scale producers focused mostly on blue shrimp using gillnets and small trawling systems. Landings for the small-scale fleet in the Pacific represent almost half the production with the fleets of Sonora and Sinaloa as the biggest contributors.

According to managers, the shrimp resource has been at its maximum sustainable yield in recent years. Current management strategy is composed of a series of measures, including: closed seasons (normally between March and September), designated fishing areas, and restrictions on gear types. These measures as a whole are designed to maintain the reproductive biomass and avoid an increase in the fishing effort. However, some uncertainties related to the status of the stock and the specific effectiveness of the management strategies remain unclear. Similarly, the specific impacts of the drift gillnet and trawl systems on the ecosystem are not well understood. This FIP aims to help to generate information to assess and mitigate potential impacts of the fishery, improve the data to more effectively assess the status of the stocks, and encourage fishers and managers to participate actively in the review of the regulatory framework.

The shrimp fishery is one of the most economically important fisheries in Mexico. Sonora is the largest producer of shrimp from aquaculture and the second-largest producer of wild harvested shrimp in the country. Several important fishing grounds are located in places like Kino Bay or Bahia de Lobos. In the region, both industrial and small-scale producers operate targeting both brown and blue shrimp, with the small-scale producers focused mostly on blue shrimp using gillnets and small trawling systems.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Del Pacifico Seafoods
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Ruben Castro
Organization Name 
Del Pacifico Seafoods
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Iván Pérez
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
16280
Expiration Date 
August 2022

Overview

 The fishery being assessed is the Pacific Ocean tuna – longline (Sky Vision). The fishery targets north and south Pacific albacore (Thunnus alalunga), western and central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) and eastern Pacific Ocean (EPO) bigeye (T. obesus), and WCPO yellowfin and EPO (T. albacares) tuna. The longline vessels are flagged to China, Fiji, Cook Islands, and Vanuatu and fish on the WCPO and EPO high seas and within the Vanuatu, Fiji, Tuvalu, and Cook Islands Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs). The fishery is managed regionally by both the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) and Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC).

 

 The fishery being assessed is the Pacific Ocean tuna – longline (Sky Vision).

FIP at a Glance

7% 36% 57%
March 01, 2021
7% 36% 57%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Feb 2022
Target End Date
Mar 2026

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Key Traceability Ltd.
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Charles Horsnell
Organization Name 
Sky Vision Co Ltd
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Jason Chiang
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
15149

Overview

The fishery being assessed is the Taiwan Tuna Association’s Pacific albacore tuna longline fishery, which targets albacore (Thunnus alalunga). The concerned pelagic longline vessels are flagged to Taiwan and Vanuatu and operate on the high seas in the Pacific. The fishery is managed regionally by the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) and by the Inter American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (EPO).

The fishery being assessed is the Taiwan Tuna Association’s Pacific albacore tuna longline fishery, which targets albacore (Thunnus alalunga). The concerned pelagic longline vessels are flagged to Taiwan and Vanuatu and operate on the high seas in the Pacific. The fishery is managed regionally by the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) and by the Inter American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (EPO).

FIP at a Glance

7% 18% 64% 11%
July 01, 2021
7% 18% 64% 11%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

Not yet available
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Mar 2022
Target End Date
Jul 2026

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Overseas Fisheries Development Council
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Hui-Shan Ma
Organization Name 
Taiwan Tuna Association
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Tony Lin
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
14965

Overview

The Eastern Pacific Longline Large Pelagics FIP (Martec) fishery targets yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) and mahi mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) both in Costa Rica, Ecuador and Panama as well as swordfish (Xiphias gladius) exclusively in Costa Rica. The 250 longline vessels are flagged to Costa Rica and Panama and fish on the high seas and within both countries' EEZs. The fishery is locally managed by the Costa Rican Institute of Fisheries and Aquaculture (INCOPESCA) and the Panama Aquatic Resources Authority (ARAP) and regionally by the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC).

The Eastern Pacific Longline Large Pelagics FIP (Martec) fishery targets yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) and mahi mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) both in Costa Rica, Ecuador and Panama as well as swordfish (Xiphias gladius) exclusively in Costa Rica. The 250 longline vessels are flagged to Costa Rica and Panama and fish on the high seas and within both countries' EEZs.

FIP at a Glance

39% 21% 39%
November 01, 2020
39% 21% 39%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2021
Target End Date
Nov 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Key Traceability Ltd.
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Tom Evans
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
14707

Overview

The white clam (Dosinia ponderosa) semiautonomous Hookah diving fishery from the Puerto Peñasco, Sonora region of the Northern Gulf of California, has become important in recent years due to its abundance and growing market interest. The average annual catch of around 150 metric tons is generated by 18 licenses (boats) distributed between 4 cooperatives and 8 individual licensees. This fishing effort is focused on harvesting two main clam beds, evaluated by INAPESCA as a healthy population capable of sustainable management using a total allowable catch and individual quotas which they have already determined.

The white clam (Dosinia ponderosa) semiautonomous Hookah diving fishery from the Puerto Peñasco, Sonora region of the Northern Gulf of California, has become important in recent years due to its abundance and growing market interest. The average annual catch of around 150 metric tons is generated by 18 licenses (boats) distributed between 4 cooperatives and 8 individual licensees.

FIP at a Glance

25% 75%
October 01, 2020
25% 75%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2021
Target End Date
Oct 2024
Additional Impacts:
TraceabilityIUUOther

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Intercultural Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans (CEDO)
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Nelida Barajas
Email 
Phone 
+51 638 382 0113
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
14319

Overview

Swordfish is a highly migratory species of fish found throughout most of the world’s oceans. Adults are typically found between 15 degrees North and 35 degrees South, while juveniles are more common within tropical and subtropical waters. In the north Pacific Ocean, there are two stocks of swordfish. The populations are separated by a diagonal boundary that runs from Baja California to the Equator. There are two stocks of swordfish within the eastern Pacific Ocean: the northeastern Pacific Ocean stock and the southeastern Pacific Ocean stock.

A recent stock assessment noted that the biomass of swordfish in the northeastern Pacific Ocean is healthy and fishing mortality rates are stable. The biomass is not expected to decline at current fishing levels. However, the fisheries that target the species have some barriers to remove, like the fact that there are no formally adopted target reference points or harvest control rules in place. Also, there might be issues with bycatch of sea turtles, sea birds, sharks, and other fish species in longline fisheries.

The Mexican Pacific swordfish fishery targets the Northeastern Pacific Ocean stock averaging annual landings of 760 metric tons and registers 52 vessels with commercial fishing licenses for longline of which, an average of 25 vessels operates in the season. 30 are registered in Baja California State and the 22 remaining vessels are registered in Sinaloa State. 95% of the landings are exported to the United States of America subject to the NOAA Seafood Import Monitoring Program requirements for the importation of certain priority fish and fish products that have been identified as being particularly vulnerable to IUU fishing and/or seafood fraud.

Swordfish is a highly migratory species of fish found throughout most of the world’s oceans. Adults are typically found between 15 degrees North and 35 degrees South, while juveniles are more common within tropical and subtropical waters. In the north Pacific Ocean, there are two stocks of swordfish. The populations are separated by a diagonal boundary that runs from Baja California to the Equator. There are two stocks of swordfish within the eastern Pacific Ocean: the northeastern Pacific Ocean stock and the southeastern Pacific Ocean stock.

FIP at a Glance

36% 36% 29%
December 01, 2020
36% 36% 29%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2021
Target End Date
Sep 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
CÁMARA NACIONAL DE LA INDUSTRIA PESQUERA Y ACUÍCOLA
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Antonio Garcia
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
14229

Overview

The FIP is the Dongwon Industries Pacific Ocean tuna purse seine (FAD-associated sets) fishery targeting skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis), bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and yellowfin (T. albacares) tunas. The fishing vessels are flagged to the Republic of Korea, Kiribati and Tuvalu and operate in the western and central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) high seas and the following Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs): PNA countries (Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu and Tokelau as a party to the Palau Arrangement) and the Cook Islands. The fishery is managed regionally by the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC).

The FIP considers the following Units of Assessment (9 in total):

  • Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) stocks of skipjack, bigeye and yellowfin, caught by purse seine on FAD associated sets and managed by national management of PNA countries and regionally by WCPFC (three UoAs).
  • Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) stocks of skipjack, bigeye and yellowfin, caught by purse seine on FAD associated sets and managed by Cook Islands national management and regionally by WCPFC (three UoAs).
  • Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) stocks of skipjack, bigeye and yellowfin, caught by purse seine on FAD associated sets on the high seas managed by national management of the Republic of Korea and regionally by WCPFC (three UoAs).

 

The FIP is the Dongwon Industries Pacific Ocean tuna purse seine (FAD-associated sets) fishery targeting skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis), bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and yellowfin (T. albacares) tunas.

FIP at a Glance

32% 68%
April 01, 2020
7% 36% 57%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
May 2022
Target End Date
Apr 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Key Traceability Ltd.
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Kat Collinson
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
13738

Overview

The fishery being assessed is the Pacific LongLine Tuna Fishery (Fue Shin Fishery) . The fishery targets albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and catches bigeye (T. obesus), yellowfin (T. albacares) and skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis). The pelagic longline vessels are flagged to Taiwan and fish on the high seas in the Pacific. The fishery is managed regionally by the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) and by the Inter American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (EPO).

The fishery being assessed is the Pacific LongLine Tuna Fishery (Fue Shin Fishery) . The fishery targets albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and catches bigeye (T. obesus), yellowfin (T. albacares) and skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis). The pelagic longline vessels are flagged to Taiwan and fish on the high seas in the Pacific.

FIP at a Glance

7% 29% 64%
April 01, 2020
7% 29% 64%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Apr 2022
Target End Date
Apr 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Key Traceability
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Charles Horsnell
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
13398

Pages

Subscribe to Area 77 (Pacific, Eastern Central)