Area 77 (Pacific, Eastern Central)

Overview

The fishery being assessed is comprised of pelagic longline vessels that target albacore tuna with incidental catch of bigeye and yellowfin tunas, fishing on the high seas of the Pacific Ocean. The agent vessels are managed by the Liancheng Overseas Fishery (Shenzhen) Company, and are flagged to China, Taiwan, the Federated States of Micronesia and Fiji. From time to time and where permitted, the vessels may fish in national EEZs including Cook Islands, FSM, Fiji, and Vanuatu. It is assumed in this pre-assessment that management within these EEZs is at least equal to the high seas.

The fishery being assessed is comprised of pelagic longline vessels that target albacore tuna with incidental catch of bigeye and yellowfin tunas, fishing on the high seas of the Pacific Ocean. The agent vessels are managed by the Liancheng Overseas Fishery (Shenzhen) Company, and are flagged to China, Taiwan, the Federated States of Micronesia and Fiji. From time to time and where permitted, the vessels may fish in national EEZs including Cook Islands, FSM, Fiji, and Vanuatu. It is assumed in this pre-assessment that management within these EEZs is at least equal to the high seas.

FIP at a Glance

11% 43% 46%
September 01, 2019
11% 43% 46%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Mar 2020
Target End Date
Sep 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Key Traceability Ltd.
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Tom Evans
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Overview

The multi-species longline fishery targeting highly migratory large pelagic species as tuna, swordfish and mahi mahi, is of crucial environmental, social and economic importance in Costa Rica for coastal livelihoods and the processing and export industries. It is the most relevant seafood sector in the country for the international markets; specifically, the US, which imports 80% of the landed volume. Additionally, domestic consumption of these three species has increased recently. Costa Rican commercial fleet mainly uses surface longline as fishing gear and complementary a fiberglass pole is carrying on for green stick fishing. Approximately, 350 vessels are registered, ranging from 12 m to 25 m in length, denominated medium and advance. The main Pacific fishing communities for these species are Cuajiniquil, Puntarenas, Quepos and Golfito. This is a national FIP that encompasses the total medium and advance-type longline vessels fishing in the Pacific Ocean.

Several species of tunas, billfishes and sharks, among others, are primary and secondary species, and olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) is the most abundance endangered, threatened and protected species (ETP) of this fishery.

INCOPESCA is the institution that manages, regulates and promotes the development of the fishing and aquaculture sector with an ecosystem approach, under the principles of sustainability, social responsibility and competitiveness. The National Coast Guard System (SNG) is responsible for monitoring and surveillance at sea.

The main regulation instrument is the Fisheries and Aquaculture Law No. 8436 of 2005 and its Norm. INCOPESCA's highest institutional authority is the Board of Directors (Law 7384, the law creating the Costa Rican Institute of Fisheries and Aquaculture) and its purpose is to direct and establish institutional policies for compliance with the laws governing the country's fisheries and aquaculture. Executive Decree No. 38681 MAG-MINAE for the management of tuna and tuna-like species in the Exclusive Economic Zone of the Costa Rican Pacific Ocean establishes zoning and regulation for these species. The National Fisheries and Aquaculture Development Plan guides this sector.

Costa Rica is a member of the Organization of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Sector of the Central American Isthmus (OSPESCA), the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (CIAT) and the Inter-American Convention on the Protection and Conservation of Sea Turtles (IAC), which establishes binding resolutions and conservation measures in the country.

To improve the sustainability performance of this fishery, an alliance between Costa Rican Fishery and Aquaculture Institute (INCOPESCA), Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (MAG), producers, exporters, a group of US supply chain actors, and United Nation Development Program (UNDP) along with fisheries in Costa Rica have come together to start a Fishery Improvement Project. FIP will be led in country and receive support from market chain actors.

Lead FIP participants from Costa Rica are organized under a FIP working group included in the National Sustainable Fishery Platform for Large Pelagic, a multi-stakeholder dialogue forum facilitated by UNDP and participated by all national stakeholders linked to the large pelagic fisheries in country. The National FIP working group that will lead implementation of the project is composed by:

  • Costa Rican Fishery and Aquaculture Institute (INCOPESCA)
  • Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (MAG)
  • National Longline Fishing Sector: Cámara Nacional de la Industria Palangrera (CNIP); Cámara de pescadores artesanales de Puntarenas (CAPAP); Cámara de pescadores de Quepos; Cámara de pescadores de Guanacaste; Cámara de pescadores de Golfito; CAMAPUN; UNIPESCA. 
  • Exporters Association- CANEPP Cámara Nacional de Exportadores de Productos Pesqueros y Acuícolas (CANEPP)
  • MARTEC
  • FRUMAR
  • UNDP

Participants from the Supply Chain have organized under a Market Support Group. As such, US participants in the FIP, provide assistance to the project through financial support arising from a percentage of the sales. Market Support Group is formed by:

  • Chefs Trading
  • Trinity Seafood
  • Seattle Fish Company
  • Frequentz

The National Sustainable Fishery Platform for Large Pelagic is an initiative framed within the UNDP’s International Green Commodities Programme and the Global Sustainable Supply Chains for Marine Commodities, a joint programme implemented by UNDP and the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP), who has provided support and technical advice during FIP development.

The multi-species longline fishery targeting highly migratory large pelagic species as tuna, swordfish and mahi mahi, is of crucial environmental, social and economic importance in Costa Rica for coastal livelihoods and the processing and export industries. It is the most relevant seafood sector in the country for the international markets; specifically, the US, which imports 80% of the landed volume. Additionally, domestic consumption of these three species has increased recently.

FIP at a Glance

43% 25% 29% 4%
April 01, 2019
43% 25% 29% 4%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jan 2020
Target End Date
Apr 2023

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
United National Development Program (UNDP)
Organization Type 
Other
Primary Contact 
Sandra Andraka
Phone 
+506 83650845
Organization Name 
Organizaciones Pesqueras del Sector Palangrero Nacional
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Mauricio González
Organization Name 
Cámara Nacional de la Industria Palangrera (CNIP)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Robert Nunes
Organization Name 
Cámara Nacional de Exportadores de Productos Pesqueros y Acuícolas (CANEPP)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Ana Victoria Paniagua
Email 
Organization Name 
Instituto Costarricense de Pesca y Acuicultura (INCOPESCA) - Government
Organization Type 
Other
Primary Contact 
Alvaro Otárola / José Miguel Carvajal
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Overview

In mid-2018, Environmental Defense Fund of Mexico (EDF) and Pronatura Noroeste (PNO) established a FIP for chocolate clams (Megapitaria squalida), in the Lagoon System of Altata-Ensenada del Pabellón, Sinaloa, Mexico. Since 2014, EDF and PNO, in coordination with the federal, state and municipal authorities, academia and fishing sector, have been developing a Fisheries Management Plan (FMP) for this Lagoon System, which recommends gathering data on the state of the fishery's health with a focus on defining management tools that help improve the conditions of the bivalve resource. This FIP defines the actions that should be taken to make these improvements and can define better market conditions as well. On November 6, 2018, the FIP held its first workshop, in which 69 people participated, representing the different sectors that are involved with the fishery. A working group was created, whose task was to design a FIP work plan, with actions, specific tasks and responsibilities. The a Minute of Agreements with the working group was signed, which constituted the first step to ensure the commitment of the members of this group and their participation in the FIP.

In mid-2018, Environmental Defense Fund of Mexico (EDF) and Pronatura Noroeste (PNO) established a FIP for chocolate clams (Megapitaria squalida), in the Lagoon System of Altata-Ensenada del Pabellón, Sinaloa, Mexico. Since 2014, EDF and PNO, in coordination with the federal, state and municipal authorities, academia and fishing sector, have been developing a Fisheries Management Plan (FMP) for this Lagoon System, which recommends gathering data on the state of the fishery's health with a focus on defining management tools that help improve the conditions of the bivalve resource.

FIP at a Glance

11% 32% 32% 25%
January 01, 2019
11% 32% 32% 25%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Mar 2020
Target End Date
Dec 2023
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Pronatura Noroeste
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Pablo Álvarez
Phone 
+52 1 6461282459
Organization Name 
Environmental Defense Fund de Mexico
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Aristo Stavrinaky
Phone 
+1 805 4038957
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Overview

The blue swimming crab (Callinectes bellicosus) fishery from the Puerto Peñasco – Puerto Lobos coastal corridor (Sonora, Mexico; 399 boats and 207 official fishing permits) produces on average 1.2 thousand tons/year, with metallic mesh Chesapeake traps (typically 90 traps/boat).

In its present condition and according to the Marine Stewardship Council Standard, 48 percent of the performance indicators for the fishery are “GREEN” (stock rebuilding capacity; information and monitoring for management; stock assessment; ETP species; habitat information and management; ecosystem information and outcome; legal framework; and consultation, roles and responsibilities). 36 percent of its indicators are “YELLOW” because: i) stock assessment should yet recognize extractions from illegal fishing effort (as big as the legal effort at the present) and mortality induced by industrial shrimp trawling; ii) fisheries ordination opportunities and fisheries refuges must be operative for reducing present mortality levels by 10 percent; iii) the management plan must recognize stock reference points; iv) responsible fishing operations and low bycatch rates must be endorsed by onboard observers; vi) impacts of biomass removals of snail, sand bass and triggerfish as bycatch of the swimming crab fishery must be dimensioned; vii) ghost fishing related to lost and abandoned crab traps must be assessed and eliminated. 16 percent of the fishery indicators are “RED” because: i) the fishery management plan lacks management objectives, population reference points, action plan, as well as agreed evaluation mechanisms and decision-making processes; ii) surveillance programs deterring poaching are missing.

During the first year, CEDO will implement a technical work plan for improving the commercial fishing operations of S.C.P.P. Ejidal Bahía San Jorge. CEDO and the Rillito Park Heirloom Farmers Market will collaborate prospecting and addressing additional funding for the FIP development. The core group will communicate and promote improvements to the official management plan among INAPESCA, CONAPESCA, and other local and regional organized fishers.

The technical work plan consists of: i) the operation of a season-round (2019-2020) and community-based fishery monitoring program; ii) the operation of onboard and land-based swimming crab fishery bycatch monitoring programs; iii) the undertaking of catch efficiency and selectivity trials with different baits; iv) the mitigation of ghost fishing by derelict swimming crab traps; v) the undertaking of cost-benefit assessments for the use of degradable clips in the construction of swimming crab traps; vi) the design and implementation of a wastes management and re-use plan for the swimming crab fishery; vii) the undertaking of biologic monitoring and detailed physical characterization of potential fishery refuges and viii) the continuous promotion of the FIP among INAPESCA, CONAPESCA and other local and regional organized fishers. Catch traceability options for the fishery will be additionally prospected. This work plan aims for the improvement of all 13 fishery performance indicators scored as yellow and red and implies the direct investment of USD $79,946 during the first year.

The blue swimming crab (Callinectes bellicosus) fishery from the Puerto Peñasco – Puerto Lobos coastal corridor (Sonora, Mexico; 399 boats and 207 official fishing permits) produces on average 1.2 thousand tons/year, with metallic mesh Chesapeake traps (typically 90 traps/boat).

FIP at a Glance

14% 32% 43% 11%
April 01, 2019
14% 32% 43% 11%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Oct 2019
Target End Date
Apr 2022
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Intercultural Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans (CEDO)
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Peggy Turk Boyer
Phone 
520-320-5473; 520-419-7094.
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

A mixed-species hook and line FIP is carried out in the Gulf of California in the region known as the San Cosme-Punta Coyote Corridor, in the state of Baja California Sur, Mexico. This FIP began its “Phase 0: Identification” in mid-2017 with the target of a finfish fishery comprising about 33 main species fished with hook and line.

For the analysis and management of this fishery, an indicator species approach was used, using the proposed modification of the MSC Standard for mixed-species fisheries. The species identified as indicators are assumed to be representative of the rest of the species harvested. Therefore, the measures adopted and improvements accomplished in these indicator species should have a positive impact on the rest of the species. The indicator species are those listed below in this FIP profile. At the outset of this project, the fishing cooperatives located in the northern area of the corridor are participating in the FIP, with the goal that other fishing organizations and independent fishermen from the southern part of the corridor can be incorporated.

This fishery is small-scale carried out in outboard motors vessels. There are fishing cooperative and independent fisherman permits. As a result of the pre-assessment of the fishery, there is the intention to address all those performance indicators that have been scored in red and yellow, and the implementers will evaluate if it is necessary to follow up on any indicator scored in green. Equally as important, the additional impacts related to the commercialization of the product will be addressed too.

A mixed-species hook and line FIP is carried out in the Gulf of California in the region known as the San Cosme-Punta Coyote Corridor, in the state of Baja California Sur, Mexico. This FIP began its “Phase 0: Identification” in mid-2017 with the target of a finfish fishery comprising about 33 main species fished with hook and line.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Niparajá
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Ollin González
Phone 
+52 1 612 170 0374
Organization Name 
Pronatura Noroeste
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Pablo Álvarez
Phone 
+52 1 6461282459
Organization Name 
SmartFish
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Ashley Nee
Phone 
+52 1 612 156 5544
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Expiration Date 
March 2020

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

The FIP targets stocks of skipjack, yellowfin, and bigeye tropical tunas. The fishing method/gear used in this fishery is purse seine. The way in which the fleet pursuing these stocks that will be part of the FIP and improvements is defined as follows: US flagged purse seine vessels (size class 6 in EPO/IATTC)

The FIP targets stocks of skipjack, yellowfin, and bigeye tropical tunas. The fishing method/gear used in this fishery is purse seine. The way in which the fleet pursuing these stocks that will be part of the FIP and improvements is defined as follows: US flagged purse seine vessels (size class 6 in EPO/IATTC)

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
US Pacific Tuna Group
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
John Zuanich
Phone 
310-710-4522
Organization Name 
WWF-US
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Nicole Beetle
Phone 
202-495-4464
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.
Expiration Date 
December 2019

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

The FIP will target stocks of skipjack, yellowfin, and bigeye tropical tunas. The fishing method/gear used in this fishery is purse seine. The way in which the fleet pursuing these stocks that will be part of the FIP and improvements is defined as follows: US flagged purse seine vessels (size class 6 in EPO/IATTC)

The FIP will target stocks of skipjack, yellowfin, and bigeye tropical tunas. The fishing method/gear used in this fishery is purse seine. The way in which the fleet pursuing these stocks that will be part of the FIP and improvements is defined as follows: US flagged purse seine vessels (size class 6 in EPO/IATTC)

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
US Pacific Tuna Group
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
John Zuanich
Phone 
310-710-4522
Organization Name 
WWF-US
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Nicole Beetle
Phone 
202-495-4464
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.
Expiration Date 
December 2019

Overview

Shrimp in the northwest Pacific coast of Mexico, including the Gulf of California, is the most important fishery in México. It has the highest economic value of landings, averaging $340 million. It is also the highest ranked fishery in terms of number of vessels (750 bottom trawlers and about 16,000 small-scale vessels) and number of direct jobs (37,000 direct jobs and 75,000 indirect ones). It places third in terms of volume with annual landings of approximately 42,000 tons during a season that begins in September and runs through March. The small-scale shrimp fishery in the Gulf of California contributes to these figures with annual landings of 16,000 tons, of which, 10,600 are produced in the Sonora-Sinaloa corridor.

Sustainability  Challenges:

According to the National Fisheries Institute, the fishery is at the maximum sustainable yield, therefore, the management strategies are designed to maintain the reproductive biomass, protect the offspring, and avoid an increase the fishing effort. However, the absence of an updated, robust and publicly available stock assessment impedes confirming whether or not the harvest strategy and control rules in place are effective.

Regarding the environmental performance of the fishing gear, there is publicly available information on the chinchorro de linea and Suripera environmental impacts. There is no publicly available information for the bottom trawl used by the small-scale producers.

Other concerns related to the management system include the operation of non-authorized vessels and the use of fishing gears with a different configuration to that required by the regulatory framework.

Shrimp in the northwest Pacific coast of Mexico, including the Gulf of California, is the most important fishery in México. It has the highest economic value of landings, averaging $340 million. It is also the highest ranked fishery in terms of number of vessels (750 bottom trawlers and about 16,000 small-scale vessels) and number of direct jobs (37,000 direct jobs and 75,000 indirect ones). It places third in terms of volume with annual landings of approximately 42,000 tons during a season that begins in September and runs through March.

FIP at a Glance

29% 46% 18% 7%
September 01, 2018
29% 46% 18% 7%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Oct 2019
Target End Date
Dec 2021

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Eastern Fish Company
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Eric Bloom
Organization Name 
Meridian Products
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Rick Martin
Organization Name 
Ocean Garden
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Lance Leonard
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Overview

An octopus FIP is being carried out in the Gulf of California, Mexico with the main objective of making the fishery sustainable. This fishery covers the region known as Bahia de Los Angeles (BLA), inside natural protected areas. The octopus fishery is the most important for the local community and the fishermen have traditionally caught the octopus by gleaning, free diving and using traps. The catch of octopus in BLA represents the 90% of the total octopus catch in Baja California State and it is a fishery with high value and great potential for commercialization.

An octopus FIP is being carried out in the Gulf of California, Mexico with the main objective of making the fishery sustainable. This fishery covers the region known as Bahia de Los Angeles (BLA), inside natural protected areas. The octopus fishery is the most important for the local community and the fishermen have traditionally caught the octopus by gleaning, free diving and using traps. The catch of octopus in BLA represents the 90% of the total octopus catch in Baja California State and it is a fishery with high value and great potential for commercialization.

FIP at a Glance

25% 21% 21% 32%
January 01, 2018
25% 21% 21% 32%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2019
Target End Date
Dec 2022
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Pronatura Noroeste A.C.
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Pablo Alvarez
Phone 
+526461753461 ext. 110
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Overview

Mexico is the primary global producer of ocean whitefish (Caulolatilus princeps) with 94% of national landings coming from the state of Baja California Sur. Nevertheless, there are no species-specific management measures in place for this fishery. The only management tool in place is fishing permits for finfish that specify the number of boats and gear that can be used per permit holder.

The fishing cooperative Buzos y Pescadores de la Baja California S.C.L. located on Isla Natividad, Baja California Sur have demonstrated their commitment to sustainability through the establishment of marine reserves in collaboration with Comunidad y Biodiversidad, A. C. (COBI), MSC certification of their lobster fishery, Seafood Watch green rating of their yellowtail fishery, and a restoration program for abalone in collaboration with the state government and academia. In recent years, they have shown an increased interest in developing more sustainable finfish fisheries, such as ocean whitefish.

A relatively new fishery, the directed catch of ocean whitefish started in 2011 as an economic alternative to high-value benthic fisheries that have been declining in recent years. The cooperatives initial production of 3.7 T in 2011 increased to 13.4 T in 2016 and is expected to increase further as demand grows. As a result, the cooperative approached SmartFish in 2017, expressing their interest in conducting a fisheries improvement project. The FIP is exclusive to boats belonging to the cooperative Buzos y Pescadores that fish with handlines and traps.  

In the winter of 2017 Pronatura Noreste conducted a Marine Stewardship Council pre-assessment of the Isla Natividad ocean whitefish fishery. The main concerns identified by the preliminary assessment were the lack of a formal stock assessment and bycatch management strategy. The status of habitats and ecosystem impacts were identified as minor concerns; however, the potential impact of fishing gear needs to be evaluated.

In addition, SmartFish A.C. is working to improve access to markets that value sustainability and implement digital traceability.

Mexico is the primary global producer of ocean whitefish (Caulolatilus princeps) with 94% of national landings coming from the state of Baja California Sur. Nevertheless, there are no species-specific management measures in place for this fishery. The only management tool in place is fishing permits for finfish that specify the number of boats and gear that can be used per permit holder.

FIP at a Glance

25% 14% 61%
June 01, 2018
25% 14% 61%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
B Good Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jan 2020
Target End Date
Jun 2021

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Comunidad y Biodiversidad, A. C. (COBI)
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Francisco Fernández
Organization Name 
Comunidad y Biodiversidad, A. C. (COBI)
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Lorena Rocha
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

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