Area 87 (Pacific, Southeast)

Overview

The FIP focuses on the Patagonian red octopus (Enteroctopus megalocyathus) fishery, which operates in the Los Lagos Region, where most landings are brought in. In the Los Lagos Region, landings can reach 1,000 tons per year. On the commercial side, this species competes with the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) in the international market.

The present FIP proposed the following lines of action:

  1. Determination of stock status and management strategy development
  2. Collection of fishery-dependent data
  3. Collection of fishery data for Primary, Secondary and ETP species
  4. Establish Habitats and ecosystem status
  5. Specific Management Development

The FIP focuses on the Patagonian red octopus (Enteroctopus megalocyathus) fishery, which operates in the Los Lagos Region, where most landings are brought in. In the Los Lagos Region, landings can reach 1,000 tons per year. On the commercial side, this species competes with the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) in the international market.

The present FIP proposed the following lines of action:

FIP at a Glance

18% 14% 43% 25%
October 01, 2018
18% 14% 43% 25%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Aug 2019
Target End Date
Jan 2021

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Ecos Research Center
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Gonzalo Olea
Phone 
+56985283012
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Overview

In Chile, the decapods crustacean fishery is mainly sustained by the extraction of the stone crab (Metacarcinus edwardsii). Chile's decapod crustaceans catch total in 2017 was 7.277 tonnes, and more than 66% of the catch was stone crab. In addition, there is a clear geographical concentration of the landings of this resource. Of the 4.872 tonnes of stone crab landed in 2017, 79% originated in the Los Lagos Region[1]. All the fishing fleets that operate in this fishery are artisanal and the preferential fishing gear is the trap.

 

[1] Fisheries Statistical yearbook. (NFAS, Revised in December 2018). 

In Chile, the decapods crustacean fishery is mainly sustained by the extraction of the stone crab (Metacarcinus edwardsii). Chile's decapod crustaceans catch total in 2017 was 7.277 tonnes, and more than 66% of the catch was stone crab. In addition, there is a clear geographical concentration of the landings of this resource. Of the 4.872 tonnes of stone crab landed in 2017, 79% originated in the Los Lagos Region[1].

FIP at a Glance

4% 29% 68%
June 01, 2018
4% 29% 68%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2019
Target End Date
Jan 2022
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
ECOS Reserch Center
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Gonzalo Olea
Phone 
+56985283012
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Overview

Jumbo squid represents the second biggest fishery in Peru and the most important for artisanal fishers. Over 11 thousand fishers and more than 3 thousand fishing vessels are involved in the fishery, which lands each year around 500 thousand tons of squid. This is a highly selective fishery as all squid jigs are used to catch them one by one. A critical issue that the fishery needs to improve are national regulations related to the fisheries' formalization and given its highly migratory characteristics an international approach should also be sought. It is expected that with the collaboration of all the FIP Participants the fishery can move towards a more sustainable state.

Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) is one of the largest (2.5 metres maximum length and 50 kg maximum weight) and the most abundant cephalopod species of the world. Three intraspecific groups have been identified for Giant or Jumbo flying squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Southeast Pacific, based on size-at-maturity (Nigmatullin et al. 2001), but as no genetic difference has been found between the three proposed sub-unit populations, thus it is still considered to constitute a single stock (Xu et al. 2017). Their abundance and distribution patterns are very sensitive to changes in the environmental conditions and the abundance of its preys. In Peru, the resource is almost exclusively exploited by artisanal fleet who must have a fishing permit to be able to operate in Peruvian waters. The fleet operates with jiggers, a special form of vertical lines mostly used in the fishery for squid. Special squid jiggers (Ripped hooks) are mounted one after the other in a certain distance with a monofilament line. The line weighed down by sinkers can be set up to 200 m depth and is hauled with jerky movements. (http://www.fao.org/fishery/geartype/231/en). The assessment, monitoring and management measures are not well defined and not provide accurate data to address sustainability issues

Jumbo squid represents the second biggest fishery in Peru and the most important for artisanal fishers. Over 11 thousand fishers and more than 3 thousand fishing vessels are involved in the fishery, which lands each year around 500 thousand tons of squid. This is a highly selective fishery as all squid jigs are used to catch them one by one. A critical issue that the fishery needs to improve are national regulations related to the fisheries' formalization and given its highly migratory characteristics an international approach should also be sought.

FIP at a Glance

29% 36% 36%
February 01, 2018
57% 11% 32%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
May 2019
Target End Date
Dec 2023
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
WWF Peru
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Nicolás Rovegno
Phone 
+51 942 611 923
Organization Name 
WWF US
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Wendy Goyert
Organization Name 
Fishing and Aquaculture Committee of the National Industry Society
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Darío Alvites
Phone 
(+511) 442 4351 / 442 2460
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Overview

Confremar LLC USA is hosting a fishery improvement project for Pacific swordfish landed in Peru by two Spanish flagged longline vessels.  The product is frozen onboard.  The goal of the FIP is to help the fishery achieve certification by the Marine Stewardship Council with stepwise program improvements launched by Confremar.  Launched on August 21, 2017, the first actions in the FIP were for improved reporting of catch and effort reporting and support of conservation and management measures for incidental shark catches, beginning with support for a unified CMM.  In the first quarter of 2018 the FIP focused on shark survival after release from the gear and return to the ocean.  Then FIP priorities expanded in 2019 to include seabirds and turtles due to the adoption of two new conservation and management measures at the 15th regular WCPFC session (December 2018) for mitigating fishing impacts to seabirds (2018-03) and turtles (2018-04) as well as the failure to adopt a unified CMM for sharks.  Implementation of the specific gear and other mitigative steps in 2018-03 and 2018-04 is a new priority for the FIP.

Confremar LLC USA is hosting a fishery improvement project for Pacific swordfish landed in Peru by two Spanish flagged longline vessels.  The product is frozen onboard.  The goal of the FIP is to help the fishery achieve certification by the Marine Stewardship Council with stepwise program improvements launched by Confremar.  Launched on August 21, 2017, the first actions in the FIP were for improved reporting of catch and effort reporting and support of conservation and management measures for incidental shark catches, beginning with support for a unified CMM.  In the first quarter of 2018

FIP at a Glance

39% 61%
June 01, 2017
43% 57%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
B Good Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Aug 2019
Target End Date
Dec 2022

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Confremar
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Eddie Corvalan
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Overview

The fishery being assessed is the Pacific Tuna Longline Fishery targeting albacore (Thunnus alalunga), bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) tuna across all regions of the Pacific Ocean.

The Pacific Tuna Longline Fishery aims to meet the rising global demand for tuna in a sustainable manner by assuring catches do not exceed sustainable levels, promoting the ecosystem based approach to fisheries management and strengthening policy and governance systems in the region.

Pacific Tuna Longline Fishery goals:

  • Sustainable Fish Stocks – To ensure tuna and other primary species catches across the Pacific Ocean do not exceed sustainable levels
  • Minimising Environmental Impacts – To promote the ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management
  • Effective Management – To strengthen governance systems in the WCPFC, IATTC and Pacific Tuna Longline fishery.

The fishery being assessed is the Pacific Tuna Longline Fishery targeting albacore (Thunnus alalunga), bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) tuna across all regions of the Pacific Ocean.

The Pacific Tuna Longline Fishery aims to meet the rising global demand for tuna in a sustainable manner by assuring catches do not exceed sustainable levels, promoting the ecosystem based approach to fisheries management and strengthening policy and governance systems in the region.

FIP at a Glance

7% 36% 57%
December 01, 2017
18% 29% 54%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jul 2019
Target End Date
Dec 2022
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Key Traceability Ltd.
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Tom Evans
Phone 
+44 7505122728
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Overview

The Peruvian hake (Merluccius gayi peruanus) fishery operates off of northern Peru and part of the stock inhabits the area between the Ecuador-Peru border.  The port city of Paita accounts for almost all Peruvian landings, giving this fishery considerable socio-economic importance for that community. There is also a small artisanal hake fishery (row boats and gillnets) in Peru that represents less than 5% of landings.  It should be noted that Ecuador initiated a trawling fishery for hake in 2013.

The Peruvian hake (Merluccius gayi peruanus) fishery operates off of northern Peru and part of the stock inhabits the area between the Ecuador-Peru border.  The port city of Paita accounts for almost all Peruvian landings, giving this fishery considerable socio-economic importance for that community. There is also a small artisanal hake fishery (row boats and gillnets) in Peru that represents less than 5% of landings.  It should be noted that Ecuador initiated a trawling fishery for hake in 2013.

FIP at a Glance

32% 68%
February 01, 2017
7% 61% 32%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2019
Target End Date
Mar 2020
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
CeDePesca
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Carmen Guerrero
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Overview

Landings from the artisanal and small-scale fleets are used for direct human consumption. Peruvian anchovy is one of the key species within the Southeastern Pacific ecosystem as it is consumed by many other animal species. It is extremely sensitive to variable environmental conditions under the influence of the Humboldt Current, the Cromwell Current, and periodic strong El Niño and La Niña events.

The three fishing fleets targeting the Northern-Central stock of anchovy (including their fishing capacity) are:  an artisanal fishing fleet of vessels of less than 10 cubic meters GRT; a small-scale fishing fleet of vessels of more than 10 cubic meters GRT and less than 32.6 cubic meters GRT; and an industrial fishing fleet of vessels larger than 32.6 cubic meters.  The Chimbote and Sechura fleets, from which Compañía Americana de Conservas (Grupo Consorcio) and Lovering Foods source from belong to the small-scale and artisanal fleet category.

The main issues regarding the sustainability of the small-scale fishery are:

  • There is little knowledge of the impacts the Chimbote and the Sechura small-scale fleets have over other ecosystem components, such as bycatch species and endangered, threatened and protected (ETP) species.
  • Catch limits for the small-scale fleet need to be reinforced and landing and transportation controls need to be strengthened.
  • Transparency of science should continue to increase, so that information on the stock status in relation to its ecosystem reference points are readily available to the public.

Landings from the artisanal and small-scale fleets are used for direct human consumption. Peruvian anchovy is one of the key species within the Southeastern Pacific ecosystem as it is consumed by many other animal species. It is extremely sensitive to variable environmental conditions under the influence of the Humboldt Current, the Cromwell Current, and periodic strong El Niño and La Niña events.

FIP at a Glance

11% 50% 39%
January 01, 2017
39% 36% 25%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2019
Target End Date
Mar 2020
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
CeDePesca
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Julissa Melo
Organization Name 
Lovering Foods
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Amber Madley
Organization Name 
Compañía Americana de Conservas (Grupo Consorcio)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Isabel Valcárcel
Phone 
http://www.companiaamericana.com.pe/
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Overview

This FIP encompasses all global tropical tuna stocks of three species: bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus), skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis) and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) for a total of 13 Units of Certification. In the case of this specific sub-FIP for the Eastern Pacific Ocean, we deal with three stocks of tunas - one each for skipjack, bigeye tuna, and yellowfin tuna.

Because of the set-up of FisheryProgress, the overarching FIP was broken into four sub-FIPs according to the relevant RFMO (IATTC, ICCAT, IOTC, and WCPFC). The reasoning behind this division is that each RFMO has different scores and actions for the various MSC principles, in particular for Principles 1 & 3. Had we grouped all RFMOs together, we would not have been able to present or track the various activities and timelines in a cohesive, clear and comprehensive manner.

This FIP encompasses all global tropical tuna stocks of three species: bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus), skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis) and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) for a total of 13 Units of Certification. In the case of this specific sub-FIP for the Eastern Pacific Ocean, we deal with three stocks of tunas - one each for skipjack, bigeye tuna, and yellowfin tuna.

FIP at a Glance

4% 43% 54%
October 01, 2016
11% 50% 39%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
B Good Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
May 2019
Target End Date
Sep 2021
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
OPAGAC
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Dr Julio Morón
Phone 
+34 91 431 48 57
Organization Name 
WWF
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Dr. Bill Fox
Phone 
+15712058845
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Overview

Reason for Inactivity 
Missed two consecutive reports

Mahi-mahi is a favorite for consumers due to its firm texture and mild taste.  This FIP is an investment in the artisanal longline fishery in Peru, which fishes the offshore population stock in the southeastern Pacific Ocean.  Mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus, also known as Dorado and Perico) is a migratory and rapidly reproducing fish species found throughout the warmer waters of the world's oceans and around the 23°C isotherm in waters.  The stock is managed by the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) and the Peru fleet is governed by federal fishery rules, which includes a minimum landing size.  Using the MSC standard as a guide, the FIP will encourage robust catch reporting and more sustainable fishing practices.

Mahi-mahi is a favorite for consumers due to its firm texture and mild taste.  This FIP is an investment in the artisanal longline fishery in Peru, which fishes the offshore population stock in the southeastern Pacific Ocean.  Mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus, also known as Dorado and Perico) is a migratory and rapidly reproducing fish species found throughout the warmer waters of the world's oceans and around the 23°C isotherm in waters.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Confremar Group
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Eddie Corvalan
Organization Name 
Sustainability Incubator
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Katrina Nakamura
Organization Name 
Pier Fish
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Scott Bode
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Overview

The Peruvian mahi-mahi fishery includes over 4,200 fishermen and is one of the country’s most important artisanal fisheries. Worldwide, Peru is known as the leading international mahi-mahi producer. A critical issue challenging this fishery is the lack of effective national and international management needed to address the highly migratory nature of mahi-mahi. The fishery also needs additional data on how fishing interacts with other species including endangered sea turtles and sharks. The active involvement of FIP stakeholders, such as IMARPE (Peruvian Institute of the Sea), and FIP Participants drives improvements against the Marine Stewardship Council standard.

The Peruvian mahi-mahi fishery includes over 4,200 fishermen and is one of the country’s most important artisanal fisheries. Worldwide, Peru is known as the leading international mahi-mahi producer. A critical issue challenging this fishery is the lack of effective national and international management needed to address the highly migratory nature of mahi-mahi. The fishery also needs additional data on how fishing interacts with other species including endangered sea turtles and sharks.

FIP at a Glance

36% 36% 29%
November 01, 2013
39% 32% 25% 4%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2019
Target End Date
Sep 2021
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
WWF-US
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Wendy Goyert
Phone 
202-495-4331
Organization Name 
WWF Peru
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Evelyn Luna Victoria
Organization Name 
WWF Peru
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Nicolas Rovegno
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