Mexico Sinaloa artisanal blue shrimp – drift/cast nets

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Overview

The Sinaloa artisanal shrimp FIP started in 2009 under the coordination of the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP). FIP coordination and leadership was transferred to the industry in February 2015. All of the activities, improvements, and achievements of that period are reported in the following here.

The Pacific Ocean is the most productive fishing area in Mexico, providing approximately 75 percent of seafood catch by volume, and accounting for most of the country’s seafood exports by value. Shrimp in the northwest Pacific coast of Mexico, including the Gulf of California, is the most important fishery in Mexico. It has the highest economic value of landings, averaging $260 million. It is also the highest ranked fishery in terms of the number of vessels (750 bottom trawlers and about 18,000 small-scale vessels) and the number of direct jobs (37,000 direct jobs as well as 75,000 indirect ones). It places third in terms of volume with annual captures of approximately 50,000 tons during the fishing season that begins in September and runs through March.

The Sinaloa artisanal shrimp fishery contributes to 25% of the Northwest production with the participation of 12 thousand vessels and a workforce of 24 thousand fishermen. Vessels are equipped with outboard motors (used mainly for transportation purposes, because the gear is operated with the wind/tide currents).

The fishery is regulated by the Mexican Official Standard and, according to the National Fisheries Institute, stocks are exploited at maximum sustainable levels with seasonal variations in captures related to environmental variations.

In October 2017, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch Program published a new report and recommendations on Mexican wild shrimp, giving the fishery a Good Alternative recommendation. The new recommendations can be found here. The full report can be downloaded from here.

Since January 2018, Del Pacifico started their own sustainability department that will coordinate the guidelines of the Project and organize further commitments to improve the fishing practices, evaluation and fisher’s communities.

FIP Description 

The Sinaloa artisanal shrimp FIP started in 2009 under the coordination of the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP). FIP coordination and leadership was transferred to the industry in February 2015.

FIP Objective(s) 

By the summer of 2020, the FIP aims to achieve a management performance in accordance with the MSC indicators for sustainable fisheries. This FIP is also working towards completing the following objectives:

  • Promoting a system for the continuous assessment of the shrimp populations targeted by the fishery
  • Implementing a system for the continuous monitoring and assessment of the fishery environmental impacts
  • Achieving the supply chain’s full compliance with fishery regulations
FIP Type 
Basic
FIP Stage 
Stage 4: Improvements in Fishing Practices or Fishery Management
Start and Projected End Dates
October 2009
December 2020
Next Progress Report Due 
Sunday, June 30, 2019
Species 
Common Name 
Blue Shrimp
Scientific Name 
Penaeus stylirostris
Additional Names 
Pacific blue shrimp
Gear Type 
Cast Net
Driftnet
Location
FAO Major Fishing Area
Area 77 (Pacific, Eastern Central)
Exclusive Economic Zones
Country 
Mexico
Additional Attributes 
The fishery occurs in the coastal lagoons and lower reaches of estuaries in central Sinaloa State
Regional Fisheries Management Organization
Volume
FIP Volume 
750 metric tons
Total Fishery Volume 
12,000 metric tons
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FIP at a Glance

29% 50% 21%
October 01, 2009
21% 21% 36% 21%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
B Good Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jun 2019
Target End Date
Dec 2020
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Del Pacifico Seafoods
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Sergio Castro
Organization Name 
Del Pacifico Seafoods
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Ruben Castro
Organization Name 
Del Pacifico Seafoods
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
José Mejía
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.