INACTIVE Mexico Baja California Sur yellowleg, blue and rock shrimp – bottom trawl/cast net

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Overview

Reason for Inactivity 
Missed two consecutive reports

Note: This FIP went inactive on May 29, 2020.

The Magdalena Bay shrimp FIP started in 2010 in collaboration with Northern Chef and the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP). The project leadership was transferred to Northern Chef in January 2014. Activities and achievements for that period are reported here.

The Pacific Ocean is the most productive fishing area in Mexico, providing approximately 75 percent of seafood catch by volume, and accounting for most of the country’s seafood exports by value. Shrimp in the northwest Pacific coast of Mexico is the most important fishery in Mexico. It has the highest economic value of landings, averaging $260 million. It is also the highest ranked fishery in terms of the number of vessels (750 bottom trawlers and about 18,000 small-scale vessels) and the number of direct jobs (37,000 direct jobs as well as 75,000 indirect ones). It places third in terms of volume with annual captures of approximately 50,000 tons during the fishing season which begins in September and runs through March.

The Magdalena Bay shrimp fishery generates annual landings of 3 million pounds with a value of $15 million USD. Seventy percent of the total landings are yellowleg shrimp and 30 percent are Pacific blue shrimp. The fishery operates with 27-foot-long vessels equipped with outboard motors. In the case of yellowleg shrimp, the vessels are equipped with a 35-foot head rope bottom trawl. For blue shrimp, the gear utilized is the Suripera, a modified cast net. In both cases, the fishing unit is operated by two fishermen who conduct daily trips, usually nocturnal for yellowleg shrimp and diurnal for blue shrimp.

The fishery is regulated by the Mexican Official Standard NOM-002-SAG/PESC-2013 which establishes access controls (fishing licenses and concessions) and fishing gear and fishing grounds restrictions. CONAPESCA opens and closes the fishing season according to the scientific advice provided by INAPESCA which has a continuing monitoring program on the shrimp stocks. Most recent abundance estimates indicate that both stocks yields are above the historic averages which confirms the recovery trends.

In October 2017, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch Program published a new report and recommendations on Mexican wild shrimp, giving the fishery a Good Alternative recommendation. The new recommendations can be found here. The full report can be downloaded from here.

FIP Description 

Note: This FIP went inactive on May 29, 2020.

FIP Objective(s) 

 This FIP is also working towards completing the following objectives:

  • Develop and promote a system for the continuous assessment of the shrimp populations targeted by the fishery
  • Maintain the fishery's environmental impacts at documented levels
  • Achieve the supply chain’s full compliance with fishery regulations
FIP Type 
Basic
FIP Stage 
Stage 5: Improvements on the Water
Species 
Common Name 
Brown Shrimp
Scientific Name 
Farfantepenaeus californiensis
Additional Names 
Yellowleg shrimp, Camarón café
Common Name 
Blue Shrimp
Scientific Name 
Litopenaeus stylirostris
Additional Names 
Pacific blue shrimp, Camarón azul
Common Name 
Rock Shrimp
Scientific Name 
Sicyonia penicillata
Additional Names 
Camarón japonés, camarón cacahuate
Gear Type 
Bottom Trawl
Cast Net
Location
Exclusive Economic Zones
Country 
Mexico
Geographic Scope 
Bahia Magdalena-Almejas system Southern Baja California
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FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Northern Chef
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Jeff Lam
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