Nicaragua Caribbean spiny lobster - trap

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Overview

Nicaragua is the largest Caribbean spiny lobster fishery that supplies the United States. Thousands of Nicaraguans earn a livelihood through the fishery, from vessel owners and fishermen to packing plant employees. A critical issue challenging this fishery is the likelihood of illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing (IUU) that weakens management of the resource and equitable access for local livelihoods. Concurrent issues are a lack of new or improved data from the artisanal sector to inform the stock status, bycatch, and habitat impacts from lobster traps. There are still some uncertainties relating to the structure of the stock population that need to be taken into account - even though Nicaraguan stock assessment methods are appropriate for the spiny lobster resource and for the implementation of harvest control rules, issues can arise due to the fact that this lobster fishery is also shared with Honduras. The evaluation needs to consider both countries in order to achieve an unconditional pass under the MSC standard.

FIP Description 

Nicaragua is the largest Caribbean spiny lobster fishery that supplies the United States. Thousands of Nicaraguans earn a livelihood through the fishery, from vessel owners and fishermen to packing plant employees.

FIP Objective(s) 

The objective of this FIP is to be completed by December 2021 and enter MSC full assessment after that.

FIP Type 
Comprehensive
FIP Stage 
Stage 5: Improvements on the Water
Start and Projected End Dates
January 2012
December 2021
Update 
Several activities are in progress and their corresponding verification media is being developed. This has taken more than expected, but stakeholders continue to be engaged, specially INPESCA. Additionally, some activities entail coordination with Honduras, bringing an additional complication in order to advance. September-2020: The binational stock assessment in the Honduras-Nicaragua platform is taking longer than expected. Prior the COVID-19 pandemic, the preparatory phase was completed and the second phase, the stock assessment itself, was planned to start in April 2020. Given the conditions imposed by the current situation, this phase started until July 2020. Even though data bases for Nicaragua are ready, data bases from the processing plants in Honduras are still being collected, process taking longer than planned given the restrictions imposed by COVID-19 and the start of the lobster season, so more time will be needed to finish this assessment. As efforts were focused on finishing such evaluation, the pending activities were put on hold and will continue in such state at least for 2020, retaking them on 2021 and planning to finish them by middle 2021, considering that the COVID-19 situation will continue hitting the region next year.
Next Progress Report Due 
Sunday, March 28, 2021
Species 
Common Name 
Spiny Lobster (Caribbean)
Scientific Name 
Panulirus argus
Additional Names 
Langosta espinosa del Caribe
Gear Type 
Pot/Trap
Location
FAO Major Fishing Area
Area 31 ( Atlantic, Western Central)
Exclusive Economic Zones
Country 
Nicaragua
Landings
Estimated Total FIP Landings 
3,347 metric tons
Estimated Total Fishery Landings 
3,347 metric tons
Landings Date 
March 2019
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FIP at a Glance

4% 43% 54%
January 01, 2012
15% 48% 37%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Mar 2021
Target End Date
Dec 2021

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
WWF
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Pilar Velasquez
Organization Name 
WWF
Primary Contact 
Wendy Goyert
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
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