Tokyo Bay sea perch - purse seine

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Overview

Tokyo Bay is one of the leading commercial and recreational fishing regions in Japan for Japanese sea perch (Lateolabrax japonicus), a historically and culturally important fish used for edomae sushi, the style of sushi created during the late Edo-period (late 19th century) that influenced the nigiri sushi that is common today.

While archaeological sites show that species such as sea perch were consumed in the Tokyo Bay region as far back as 300 BC, commercial sea perch fishing in Tokyo Bay expanded during the Edo Period (1600-1850s) with new technology, gear, and techniques to match growing demand. The present-day mid-scale purse seine commercial sea perch fishery is permitted by the Chiba Prefecture government, and the majority of the sea perch purse seine vessels fishing in Tokyo Bay are managed by the Funabashi Fisheries Cooperative. While fishing is permitted year-round, peak season is during the summer.

Purse seine vessels which are participants of the Tokyo Bay Sea Perch FIP are significant players in the region’s industry and account for 10-15% of the total Chiba Prefecture sea perch catch. These fishermen, led by FIP client company Kaiko Bussan, abide by voluntary conservation practices including setting non-fishing days during spawning season and limiting soak times. While the local fishery research agency in Chiba prefecture conducts stock evaluations, prefecture-wide science-based fishery management plans and objectives are lacking, which increases the risk of overfishing and stock depletion. Specific deficiencies include the lack of harvest control rules used to reduce harvest when stock abundance is declining and the lack of fishery reference points based on maximum sustainable yield (MSY) or another appropriate proxy. In addition, the formal decision-making process is not very transparent and inclusive of stakeholders.

The Tokyo Bay Sea Perch FIP will increase the scientific understanding of the fishery, its effects and sea perch stocks, improve fish management practices, work to maintain overall sea perch stock abundance in Tokyo Bay, and distinguish the sea perch fishery in the growing sustainable seafood marketplace.

FIPプロフィールレポート

FIP Description 

Tokyo Bay is one of the leading commercial and recreational fishing regions in Japan for Japanese sea perch (Lateolabrax japonicus), a historically and culturally important fish used for edomae sushi, the style of sushi created during the

FIP Objective(s) 

Improve sea perch fish management and ensure stock abundance by 2020.

FIP Type 
Comprehensive
FIP Stage 
Stage 5: Improvements on the Water
Start and Projected End Dates
November 2016
December 2020
Next Progress Report Due 
Saturday, November 30, 2019
Species 
Common Name 
White Perch
Scientific Name 
Lateolabrax japonicus
Additional Names 
Japanese Seabass, Japanese Sea Perch
Gear Type 
Purse Seine
Location
FAO Major Fishing Area
Area 61 (Pacific, Northwest)
Exclusive Economic Zones
Country 
Japan
Regional Fisheries Management Organization
High Seas Name 
Pacific Ocean
Volume
FIP Volume 
279 metric tons
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FIP at a Glance

68% 32%
November 01, 2016
36% 50% 14%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Nov 2019
Target End Date
Dec 2020
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Ocean Outcomes
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Dr. Jocelyn Drugan
Organization Name 
Seafood Legacy
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Shunji Murakami
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.