Vietnam yellowfin tuna - handline

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Overview

Rooted in earlier projects by WWF Vietnam focused on bycatch best practices, the Vietnam yellowfin tuna FIP was launched in 2014, following the completion of a Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) pre-assessment and ensuing FIP Action Plan (updated in 2020).  The Action Plan scores the yellowfin against MSC criteria, identifying gaps and recommended actions required to meet the MSC standard.  WWF Vietnam is the National FIP Manager and the Vietnam Tuna Association (VinaTuna) is also a member of the FIP Coordination Unit together with an International FIP coordinator supported by WWF-US.  

The FIP previously included the longline gear (pre-2020) but vessels historically using longline have converted to handline only.

Key Matrices:
Species: Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus albacares)
Gear Type: Handline
Location: FAO Major Fishing Area 61 (Pacific, Northwest) and Area 71 (Pacific, Western Central) Exclusive Economic Zones 
Geographic Scope: Binh Dinh, Phu Yen, Khanh Hoa
Volume: 17,859 metric tons (2018)

FIP Collaborators
The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD) together with provincial Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD) are the key State agencies collaborating with the FIP Coordination Unit.  The FIP works with relevant MARD departments, particularly the Directorate of Fisheries (DFISH), the Department of Conservation and Aquatic Resource Development (DECAP) and the Research Institute of Marine Fisheries (RIMF).  

The yellowfin tuna FIP is directly supported by several international seafood companies (FIP Participants) engaged in various aspects of implementation – including field, market, policy and financing.  We also work with tuna processing industries in Vietnam in establishing FIP traceability.

The continued active involvement of international seafood companies, domestic processors and several national government agencies, are helping to improve the rate of progress in improvements against the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) standard.

The Vietnam yellowfin tuna fishery is meeting the rising global demand for tuna. With approximately 2,000 vessels fishing for yellowfin, and a 2018 total export value of nearly $380 million, it is the most important wild-capture export product in Vietnam. 

FIP Description 

Rooted in earlier projects by WWF Vietnam focused on bycatch best practices, the Vietnam yellowfin tuna FIP was launched in 2014, following the completion of a Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) pre-assessment and ensuing FIP Action Plan (updated in

FIP Objective(s) 

To overarching goal is to achieve MSC certification by 2022.  Several intermediate objectives of the FIP have been identified, in contribution to the continual improvement in management of the fishery.  These include:

  • Supporting the development and implementation in management of harvest control rules and limit reference points, in partnership with WPEA project and wider WCPFC
  • Continued expansion of training, piloting and at-sea deployment of onboard observers in the handline fishery, including piloting of electronic logbooks, in direct partnership with industry (FIP Participants)
  • Supporting the establishment of a National Observer Program and securing the sustainable financing of its implementation towards WCPFC targets
  • Development and application in management of a Bycatch Mitigation Strategy, including full reporting of sea turtle and shark encounters 
  • Continued socialization and expansion in the use of Circle Hooks in the handline fishery, mainstreaming their adoption across the sector
  • Implementation of FIP traceability program, fully applied in all relevant processors and verified through independent 3rd party audits
  • Ongoing communication and awareness programs with fishers, processors and other stakeholders related to the FIP 
FIP Type 
Comprehensive
FIP Stage 
Stage 5: Improvements on the Water
Start and Projected End Dates
April 2014
December 2022
Update 
The FIP expected end date was extended (3 year extension) to 2022, unanimously agreed by FIP Participaants. The main reason for the extension was operational budget limitations (generally 50% of the budget originally identified in the 2014 Action Plan). Secondary factors include delays in assigning harvest control rules and reference points at WCPFC, as well as slower than anticipated implementation of the WPEA project (which included parallel activities in support of FIP outcomes)
Next Progress Report Due 
Thursday, December 31, 2020
Species 
Common Name 
Yellowfin Tuna
Scientific Name 
Thunnus albacares
Gear Type 
Handline
Location
FAO Major Fishing Area
Area 71 (Pacific, Western Central)
Exclusive Economic Zones
Country 
Viet Nam
Geographic Scope 
Binh Dinh, Phu Yen, Khanh Hoa
Regional Fisheries Management Organization
WCPFC
Landings
Estimated Total FIP Landings 
16,500 metric tons
Estimated Total Fishery Landings 
16,500 metric tons
Landings Date 
December 2018
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FIP at a Glance

7% 43% 50%
April 01, 2014
32% 50% 18%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2020
Target End Date
Dec 2022
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
WWF
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Thuy Nguyen
Organization Name 
WWF
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Keith Symington
Organization Name 
WWF
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Nick Przyuski
Organization Name 
Vietnam Tuna Association (VinaTuna)
Organization Type 
Other
Primary Contact 
Mr Tran Van Hao
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
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