COMPLETED Western and Central Pacific Ocean skipjack & yellowfin tuna - purse seine (CFC)

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Overview

What is a Completed FIP?
Completed FIPs are those that have independent verification that they have achieved their environmental objectives and/or graduated to MSC full assessment or other program assessment. Completed FIPs no longer report on their environmental performance but may choose to voluntarily report on their social performance.

Date of Completion: May 2022
Explanation of Completion: Part of the FIP's scope has moved into full assessment (see Completion link). The FIP vessels are also covered under the UoC for the following MSC certification which encompasses the full scope of this FIP — https://fisheries.msc.org/en/fisheries/tri-marine-western-and-central-pacific-skipjack-and-yellowfin-tuna/@@assessments (see Vessel List in the Public Certification Report).
Completion Link

The fishing fleet consists of six industrial purse seine fishing vessels operating in the Central Western Pacific Ocean varying in length from around 50m to 90m that are all company (CFC) owned. These vessels target Skipjack and yellowfin tuna. The RFMO is the Western Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC). Parties to the Nauru Agreement (PNA) is a sub-regional agreement on terms and conditions for tuna purse seine fishing licenses in the region. The PNA provides the basis to establish a limit on vessel days known as the VDS. The allocation is zonal with days allocated to each country in the Arrangement. The CFC fleet fish both in the EEZs (exclusive economic zones) of coastal states as well as the high seas. Some of the coastal states include Papua New Guinea, Kiribati, Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu and Tokelau. The catches in each country vary significantly between years for any specific month depending on the migration patterns of the tuna. The majority of the fishing occurs by setting the purse seine around schools aggregating near naturally drifting or purpose-built Fish Aggregating Devices know as FADs. Although the CFC boats catch tuna from both free and associated schools during fishing trips, the majority of vessels use FADs. Searching for the FADs and fish schools and assessing their size and direction of movement is an important part of their fishing operation. The tuna are generally sold and transhipped onto carrier vessels for processing in Bangkok, in ports such as Pohnpei, FSM.

FIP Description 

The fishing fleet consists of six industrial purse seine fishing vessels operating in the Central Western Pacific Ocean varying in length from around 50m to 90m that are all company (CFC) owned.

FIP Objective(s) 

The scope of the FIP will focus on:

  • supporting the data collection & reporting on FADs to help determine FAD limits and improve stock assessments;
  • use of non-entangling & biodegradable FADs and implementation of bycatch mitigation and handling best practices

In 2020 CFC will begin to provide FAD operational data beyond the WCPFC minimum requirements as it responds to the WCPFC science body-specific requests. This will continue throughout the duration of the FIP. This will include monitoring and the collection of any sources of potential unobserved mortality for underwater FAD structures. For all ETP species, the fishery will collect and report interactions and fate of any releases as well as the use of mitigation and handling techniques.

  • CFC will replace all entangling FADs with non-entangling FADs across its fleet by the end of 2020.
  • CFC will develop a suite of bycatch mitigation and handling best practice guidelines by the end of 2020 and implement these measures across its fleet by the end of 2021.
  • CFC will begin to trial alternative biodegradable materials for its FAD design and construction from 2020 through 2022. The preferred material and design will begin to be implemented across its fleet in 2023 through 2024.
FIP Type 
Basic
FIP Stage 
Stage 3: FIP Implementation
Start and Projected End Dates
July 2020
August 2024
Next Progress Report Due 
Monday, May 30, 2022
Species 
Common Name 
Skipjack Tuna
Scientific Name
Katsuwonus pelamis
Common Name 
Yellowfin Tuna
Scientific Name
Thunnus albacares
Gear Type 
Purse Seine
Location
FAO Major Fishing Area
Area 71 (Pacific, Western Central)
Exclusive Economic Zones
Country 
Micronesia (Federated States of)
Geographic Scope 
entire country
Country 
Papua New Guinea
Geographic Scope 
entire country
Country 
Kiribati
Geographic Scope 
entire country
Country 
Marshall Islands (the)
Geographic Scope 
entire country
Country 
Nauru
Geographic Scope 
entire country
Country 
Palau
Geographic Scope 
entire country
Country 
Solomon Islands
Geographic Scope 
entire country
Country 
Tuvalu
Geographic Scope 
entire country
Country 
Tokelau
Geographic Scope 
entire country
Country Flag of Vessel 
Micronesia (Federated States of)
Regional Fisheries Management Organization
WCPFC
High Seas Name 
Pacific Ocean
Landings
Estimated Total FIP Landings 
30,000 metric tons
Estimated Total Fishery Landings 
2,500,000 metric tons
Landings Date 
June 2020
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FIP at a Glance

4% 25% 71%
July 01, 2020
4% 25% 71%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

Not yet available
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
May 2022
Target End Date
Aug 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Marine Economic Development
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Mark Soboil
Email 
Phone 
+1 253 6709948
Organization Name 
Caroline Fisheries Corporation
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Marko Kamber
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
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