Bottom Trawl

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

Patagonian toothfish (Dissostichus eleginoides) is a long-lived species (> 50 years), which inhabits waters associated to the southern shelves and slopes of South America and around the sub-Antarctic islands of the Southern Ocean.  There is no evidence of large-scale geographic migrations, and studies using genetics, biochemistry, parasite fauna and tagging indicate a high degree of isolation between populations in the Indian Ocean, South Georgia and the Patagonian Shelf.

In Argentina, the fishery is managed by the Fisheries Federal Council (Consejo Federal Pesquero, CFP) and the National Secretariat for Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries (Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería y Pesca de la Nación, SAGyP), while research and stock assessment are undertaken by the National Institute of Fisheries Research and Development (Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Desarrollo Pesquero, INIDEP). The Patagonian toothfish fishery is subject to total allowable catches issued by the CFP, attending advice by INIDEP.

The companies ESTREMAR, NUEVA PESCANOVA, PESANTAR and SAN ARAWA have decided to team up with CeDePesca with the aim of designing a FIP with the ultimate goal of achieving a certifiable status for the Argentina Patagonian toothfish bottom trawl fishery.

Patagonian toothfish (Dissostichus eleginoides) is a long-lived species (> 50 years), which inhabits waters associated to the southern shelves and slopes of South America and around the sub-Antarctic islands of the Southern Ocean.  There is no evidence of large-scale geographic migrations, and studies using genetics, biochemistry, parasite fauna and tagging indicate a high degree of isolation between populations in the Indian Ocean, South Georgia and the Patagonian Shelf.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
CeDePesca
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Alejandra CORNEJO
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

Titi shrimp (Protrachypene precipua) is a tropical species that inhabits the Eastern Pacific Ocean from Nicaragua to Ecuador. Titi shrimp distribution in Ecuador, particularly in the Gulf of Guayaquil, varies depending on the season with a considerable migration in different stages of its lifecycle through the estuaries and surrounding waters. 

The industrial titi shrimp fishery in Ecuador started in the 1960s in the Gulf of Guayaquil using bottom-trawl nets. Since then, the titi shrimp fishery has supported the livelihoods of thousands of Ecuadorians that participate in different parts of the supply chain, including fishing, processing and export. The industrial fleet reached the maximum number of vessels in 1980 with 74. Since then, the fleet has diminished to reach the current effort with 39 authorized vessels.

According to the National Fisheries Institute, the landings of titi shrimp averaged 6.5 thousand metric tons per year in the 2007-2019 period with a minimum of 5.9 thousand in 2007 and a maximum of 7 thousand tons registered in 2010. It is estimated that the industrial titi shrimp fishery generates an annual income of 4.5-5 million dollars and operative revenues of 1 million for the fleet thanks to the export to USA and EU markets of 75% of the landings.

Since 2000, The industrial fishery has some management measures including a closed season, a geographic division for the authorized fleets, a daily allowed capture and the mandatory use of Turtle Excluder Devices (TED). The industrial fishery is also monitored through a Vessel Monitoring System and a network of fisheries inspectors deployed in the main landing ports. Additionally, the National Fisheries Institute keeps fishery-related historic data and, since 2013, the fleet participates in an onboard observers’ program.

Despite its economic importance, there is not enough information available related to the species biology or the fishery in general (e.g. not all the fishing mortality is well known). In addition, the current management scheme lacks of several elements that could benefit the target species and the environment.  Finally, a combination of weak international markets and the increasing producing costs, difficult the design and implementation of a harvest strategy and the correspondent control rules aimed at recovering the stocks to sustainable levels, mitigating the fishery environmental impacts and satisfying the increasing demands for social and environmental responsibility in the markets.

Titi shrimp (Protrachypene precipua) is a tropical species that inhabits the Eastern Pacific Ocean from Nicaragua to Ecuador. Titi shrimp distribution in Ecuador, particularly in the Gulf of Guayaquil, varies depending on the season with a considerable migration in different stages of its lifecycle through the estuaries and surrounding waters. 

FIP at a Glance

32% 32% 4% 32%
June 01, 2020
32% 32% 4% 32%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2020
Target End Date
Dec 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
NATLUK S.A.
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Veronica Dahik
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

This FIP concentrates on the stocks of the following species: Heterocarpus chani, H. woodmasoni and Aristeus alcocki. For the pre-assessment, the management unit is the stock of these three species found in Kerala coastal waters, mainly operating in an area called Kollam bank. 

The fishery is a mixed trawl fishery, with each vessel carrying six or seven types of trawl gear, including bottom, midwater and pelagic trawls. Each vessel may catch 200 – 250kg of shrimp per tow. The target Heterocarpus shrimp are caught in around 200-300 metres depth, with Aristeus alcocki mainly taken at 250-300m. Other deep-sea shrimp are also landed in the fishery, with for example Solenocera hextii being significant in the catch from ~150 meters. Small amounts of cephalopods and deep-sea shark species are also landed by the same boats.   

There are 700 – 750 boats operated from Sakthikulangra, and less than 50 from Vypin, 20% of which go fishing for deep-sea shrimp. Trips last between four and ten days, landing their catch in the early mornings in Kollam, which is the nearest landing site to the fishing grounds. A single vessel may do two to three hauls a day, with a towing duration of two to three hours. The fishing season is between September to May, with peak fishing from November to January. The SW monsoon brings bad weather to the coast of Kerala, which can prevent the fishery from starting until mid-September in some cases, as it takes two to three days steaming to reach the fishing grounds (Dr. Rehka Devi Chakraborty, CMFRI, pers. comm.). As with other mechanised trawl fisheries, the deep-sea fishery is subject to a ban during the monsoon period.

The responsibility for marine fisheries in India is shared between the National (Central) and State governments. The national legal framework in India gives individual States control of the seas and living marine resources up to 12 nautical miles (nm) from the shore, while the Central Government has control from 12 nm to the 200 nm exclusive economic zone (EEZ) boundary. This fishery is managed by the Department of Fisheries, Government of Kerala. 

According to the World Bank (2010) report, there are five major legal instruments of the Central government that directly govern marine fisheries and activities:

  • The Indian Fisheries Act, 1897;
  • Marine Products Export Development Authority Act 1972 (No. 13 of 1972);
  • The Maritime Zones of India (Regulation of fishing by foreign vessels) Act, 1981 (No. 42 of 1981);
  • The Maritime Zones of India (Regulation of fishing by foreign vessels) Rules, 1982;
  • The Operation of Deep Sea Fishing Vessels, 20m OAL and above, Notifications dated 14 December 2006.

State legislation is based on a model Act prepared by the central government in 1979 (World Bank, 2010) with each State developing its own marine fisheries legislation to manage fisheries in their respective area. In Kerala State, fisheries management is guided by the Kerala Marine Fishing Regulation Act, 1980 (KMFR Act). It was amended in 2017 and is in the process of being implemented across the State.

This FIP concentrates on the stocks of the following species: Heterocarpus chani, H. woodmasoni and Aristeus alcocki. For the pre-assessment, the management unit is the stock of these three species found in Kerala coastal waters, mainly operating in an area called Kollam bank. 

FIP at a Glance

32% 39% 29%
December 01, 2019
32% 39% 29%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Aug 2020
Target End Date
Dec 2024
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Forum for Deep sea Shrimp Sustainability, Kerala, FDSSK
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Susanth Mallya
Phone 
0091-9846022888
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

A number of initial meetings of the Irish hake fishery have been held and the initial objectives for the FIP identified are set out below.

The FIP is focused on the hake fishery in ICES Areas VI and VII which is mainly a trawl fishery but it has been noted there is also a gill net fishery.

The objectives of the Prospective Irish hake FIP are: 

  • To identify, through MSC pre-assessment, sustainability issues with the hake fishery. 

  • To develop and implement solutions to those identified sustainability issues through annual work plans. 

  • To collaborate with Marine Institute scientists to identify barriers to achievement of fishing levels consistent with MSY and to enhance data collection. 

A number of initial meetings of the Irish hake fishery have been held and the initial objectives for the FIP identified are set out below.

The FIP is focused on the hake fishery in ICES Areas VI and VII which is mainly a trawl fishery but it has been noted there is also a gill net fishery.

The objectives of the Prospective Irish hake FIP are: 

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Marine Applications Ltd
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Frank Fleming
Email 
Phone 
+353214928934
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.
Expiration Date 
January 2021

Overview

Reason for Inactivity 
FIP request

The Panama Republic is a relatively small country in surface (75,000 Km2), but has a substantial biological potential as seafood producing country thanks to its geographic location. Panama coasts add up to 2,988 kilometers, 1,700 in the Pacific and 1,288 in the Caribbean. The continental shelf has an extension of 250,900 Km2 and the Exclusive Economic Zone reaches 319,188 Km2

The fishing activity in Panama occurs mostly in the Pacific Ocean with 95%, where also 80% of the populations inhabits. The Gulf of Panama upwelling during the dry season is the basis for the relevant fishing activities in the Panamanian waters.

The industrial fishing operates in the Pacific Ocean and focus on shrimp, small pelagics for reduction, tuna, dolphin fish and finfish species, being the export markets the main objective. The industrial shrimp fishery is one of the main economic activities for Panama. This activity started in the 1950 with 50 vessels growing up to 307 in the 1980’s. For 2004 Panama had registered 249 industrial vessels with shrimp fishing license which diminished to 170 in 2005. Currently, due the low yields, the number of shrimp vessels is below 150.

The Panama shrimp fishery is a multispecific fishery being the Western white shrimp the most important in volume and value, followed by the Crystal and Fidel shrimps. The fishery has been for years the most important in terms of income, revenue and jobs generated. However, after years of excessive fishing effort and the noncompliance with the management measures have placed the shrimp populations in critical status resulting in decreasing landings which, combined with the weaknesses of the international market and the increasing producing costs, difficult the design and implementation of harvest strategies and harvest control rules aimed at recovering the stocks to sustainable levels, mitigate the fishery environmental impacts and to satisfy the increasing  demands for social and environmental responsibility in the markets for the Panamanian production.

 

The Panama Republic is a relatively small country in surface (75,000 Km2), but has a substantial biological potential as seafood producing country thanks to its geographic location. Panama coasts add up to 2,988 kilometers, 1,700 in the Pacific and 1,288 in the Caribbean. The continental shelf has an extension of 250,900 Km2 and the Exclusive Economic Zone reaches 319,188 Km2

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
MARPESCA SA
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Gustavo Zuñiga
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

The Gulf of Califonia hake fishery is a relatively recent fishery, carried out by 80 permitted vessels. These vessels operate mainly out of Sonora and Baja Califonia states. The fishery produces between 5,000 and 7,000 tons a year and is expected to soon be managed under a quota system. This hake FIP will focus on issues related to fishery-specific management objectives, the definition of HCRs, and defining appropriate reference points. Providing additional and more detailed information regarding its impacts on habitats and ecosystems is also of paramount importance in this FIP.

The Gulf of Califonia hake fishery is a relatively recent fishery, carried out by 80 permitted vessels. These vessels operate mainly out of Sonora and Baja Califonia states. The fishery produces between 5,000 and 7,000 tons a year and is expected to soon be managed under a quota system. This hake FIP will focus on issues related to fishery-specific management objectives, the definition of HCRs, and defining appropriate reference points. Providing additional and more detailed information regarding its impacts on habitats and ecosystems is also of paramount importance in this FIP.

FIP at a Glance

14% 39% 46%
September 01, 2019
14% 39% 46%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2020
Target End Date
Dec 2024
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Environmental Defense Fund de Mexico
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Aristo Stavrinaky
Phone 
+52 6121232011
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

The Irish prawn - bottom trawl FIP is based in ICES Area VII. The Irish vessels involved in the fishery are mainly trawlers who target nephrops with some vessels carrying out freezing at sea.

FIP membership will be comprised of commercial fishing vessels (who require a licence issued by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine to be allocated a quota to fish in the fishery), processors, retailers, the Irish Marine Institute and BIM (the Irish Sea Fisheries Board).

The initial focus on the FIP will be on establishing the FIP group itself and identifing and addressing any sustainability issues in the fishery.

The Irish prawn - bottom trawl FIP is based in ICES Area VII. The Irish vessels involved in the fishery are mainly trawlers who target nephrops with some vessels carrying out freezing at sea.

FIP membership will be comprised of commercial fishing vessels (who require a licence issued by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine to be allocated a quota to fish in the fishery), processors, retailers, the Irish Marine Institute and BIM (the Irish Sea Fisheries Board).

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Verifish
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Frank Fleming
Email 
Phone 
+353214928934
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.
Expiration Date 
November 2020

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

Argentine hake (Merluccius hubbsi) is a demersal-pelagic species that inhabits cold waters related to sub-antartic currents, and it is one of the main fishing resources in the Argentine Sea.  The Southern stock of the species is distributed between 41°S and 48°S.  The fishery is managed by the Fisheries Federal Council (Consejo Federal Pesquero, CFP) and the National Secretariat for Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries (Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería y Pesca de la Nación, SAGPyA), while research and stock assessments are undertaken by the National Institute of Fisheries Research and Development (Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Desarrollo Pesquero, INIDEP).

The industrial fishery is comprised of two main fleets: the freezing fleet and the chilling fleet. Both fleets use bottom trawls as fishing gear.  Grupo Iberconsa has decided to team up with CeDePesca with the aim of designing a FIP, with the ultimate goal of achieving a certifiable status for the Argentine hake Southern stock bottom-trawl fishery.

Currently, CeDePesca is conducting a pre-assessment against the MSC standard, and the FIP is welcoming new partners at this stage. For more information, please contact CeDePesca's Alejandra Cornejo.

Argentine hake (Merluccius hubbsi) is a demersal-pelagic species that inhabits cold waters related to sub-antartic currents, and it is one of the main fishing resources in the Argentine Sea.  The Southern stock of the species is distributed between 41°S and 48°S.  The fishery is managed by the Fisheries Federal Council (Consejo Federal Pesquero, CFP) and the National Secretariat for Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries (Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería y Pesca de la Nación, SAGPyA), while research and stock assessments are undertaken by the National Institute of Fisheries Resea

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
CeDePesca
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Alejandra Cornejo
Organization Name 
Grupo Iberconsa
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Pablo Basso
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.
Expiration Date 
October 2020

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

The Suriname corvina bottom-trawl fishery has Cynoscion acoupa and Cynoscion virescens as main target species. The main landing points are located in the four estuaries of the country: the Marowijne estuary, the Suriname-Commewijne estuary, the Coppename-Saramacca estuary and the Corantijin-Nickery estuary. A vessel monitoring system has been implemented for all trawlers as of 2007 and licensing is compulsory for all fishing units. Sea Delight, Deep Sea Atlantic and CeDePesca are working towards the design and implementation of a FIP. Currently, an assessment of the fishery's performance against the MSC standard is taking place.

The Suriname corvina bottom-trawl fishery has Cynoscion acoupa and Cynoscion virescens as main target species. The main landing points are located in the four estuaries of the country: the Marowijne estuary, the Suriname-Commewijne estuary, the Coppename-Saramacca estuary and the Corantijin-Nickery estuary. A vessel monitoring system has been implemented for all trawlers as of 2007 and licensing is compulsory for all fishing units. Sea Delight, Deep Sea Atlantic and CeDePesca are working towards the design and implementation of a FIP. Currently, an assessment of the fisher

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Sea Delight
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Stephen Fisher
Organization Name 
Deep Sea Atlantic
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Jay Molbogot
Organization Name 
CeDePesca
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Ernesto Godelman
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.
Expiration Date 
September 2020

Overview

Project UK Fisheries Improvements (PUKFI) is working towards an environmentally sustainable future for UK fisheries by running Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs) on eight UK fisheries that have been selected by the UK supply chain. They were selected due to their importance for the UK market.

Nephrops are a commpercially important species of crustacean distributed throughout the northeast Atlantic from Iceland and the western coast of Norway in the north to the Atlantic coast of Morocco and the western and central Mediterranean. They are found predominantly in muddy sediment in which they build complex burrow systems, at depths of between 20 and 800m. Although they have a wide geographical range, there is no clear evidence of any significant migration between populations.

Total Annual Catch (TAC) quotas are set for each of the three ICES management divisions that overlay the Fishery, with total 2018 TAC set at 65,738t. Of this TAC, the West of Scotland, Irish Sea and North Sea Nehrops landed 42,622t (North Sea: 21,237t; West of Scotland: 11,842t; Irish Sea: 9,543t). Nephrops are predominantly landed by demersal trawl gear, accounting for 95% of landings, with the other 5% landed by creels. Scottish-registered vessels account for 67% of landings by weight, followed by Irish-registered vessels (27%) and English-registered vessels (6%).

Project UK Fisheries Improvements (PUKFI) is working towards an environmentally sustainable future for UK fisheries by running Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs) on eight UK fisheries that have been selected by the UK supply chain. They were selected due to their importance for the UK market.

FIP at a Glance

18% 46% 36%
May 01, 2019
18% 46% 36%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jul 2020
Target End Date
Apr 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Facilitated by the Marine Stewardship Council
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Jo Pollett
Enter the public contact information for up to two leaders of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

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