Gillnet

Overview

An MSC pre-assessment and workplan were prepared for the Scottish monkfish fishery, on behalf of Seafish, in 2019. The pre-assessment was prepared by the CAB Control Union, and the workplan by the consultants MacAlister Elliott and Partners Ltd. The intention was to use these documents to start a FIP for the fishery, but due to COVID-19, the project had to be postponed.

The Units of assessment include UoA 1 which is demersal trawl and UoA 2 which is gillnet.

It is now possible to continue the project, and as such the FIP preparation to date has been reviewed. The pre-assessment as it relates to Principle 2 and most of Principle 3 continues to be relevant. In addition, since monkfish are taken as part of a mixed demersal fishery, this part of the analysis overlaps with other fisheries that are already MSC certified (e.g. SFSAG northern demersal stocks) or in a FIP (e.g. UK North Sea cod and whiting). This means that workplans are already in implementation to address the issues raised in this part of the pre-assessment, both in the context of a FIP workplan and in the context of an MSC Client Action Plan.

Conversely, the review of the pre-assessment in relation to Principle 1, and the parts of Principle 3 linked to Principle 1 (PI 3.2.1 Fishery-specific objectives) suggested that recent progress in relation to the biology of the species and the stock assessment needed to be included, in order to define an appropriate FIP workplan. It was therefore decided to provide a pre-assessment update for Principle 1 and PI 3.2.1, as a basis for scoping and a workplan update.

 

An MSC pre-assessment and workplan were prepared for the Scottish monkfish fishery, on behalf of Seafish, in 2019. The pre-assessment was prepared by the CAB Control Union, and the workplan by the consultants MacAlister Elliott and Partners Ltd. The intention was to use these documents to start a FIP for the fishery, but due to COVID-19, the project had to be postponed.

The Units of assessment include UoA 1 which is demersal trawl and UoA 2 which is gillnet.

FIP at a Glance

7% 43% 46% 4%
July 01, 2022
7% 43% 46% 4%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

Not yet available
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Feb 2023
Target End Date
Jul 2027

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Scottish Fisheries Sustainable Accreditation Group (SFSAG)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Jenny Mouat
Phone 
7496468968
Organization Name 
Jo Gascoigne
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Jo Gascoigne
Phone 
07496468968
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
18065

Overview

Mexico’s shrimp fishery is one of the country’s most important fisheries in terms of value (SAGARPA, 2013). Sinaloa is the second most important producer of shrimp in the country after Sonora (Anuario 2018) In Sinaloa, it has been estimated that around 600 small-scale are authorized to target the species. According to some recent data, 238 permits are active in the northern part of the state. The most important commercial species are the blue and brown shrimps (Litopenaeus stylirostris and Farfantepenaeus californiensis). This FIP will begin with the participation of 4 cooperatives, but the project aims to include more groups as cooperatives that operate in the Navachiste Bay, that includes producers that target both species using bottom trawl and gillnets inside the Navachiste Bay and the open waters around the bay. Finally, our project although aims to follow the framework of Fishery progress, monitoring and reporting on MSC environmental indicators, will also be monitoring and reporting improvements on both social and financial indicators of our producer partners, this will be reflected in the implementation of a triple impact workplan.

Mexico’s shrimp fishery is one of the country’s most important fisheries in terms of value (SAGARPA, 2013). Sinaloa is the second most important producer of shrimp in the country after Sonora (Anuario 2018) In Sinaloa, it has been estimated that around 600 small-scale are authorized to target the species. According to some recent data, 238 permits are active in the northern part of the state. The most important commercial species are the blue and brown shrimps (Litopenaeus stylirostris and Farfantepenaeus californiensis).

FIP at a Glance

11% 61% 25% 4%
March 01, 2022
11% 61% 25% 4%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

Not yet available
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jan 2023
Target End Date
Dec 2023

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Del Pacifico Seafoods
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Ruben Castro
Phone 
+526671010730
Organization Name 
Del Pacifico Seafoods
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Iván Pérez
Phone 
+526676458026
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
17590

Overview

Mexico's shrimp fishery is one of the country's most important fisheries in terms of value. Two fleets (industrial and small-scale) target three main species (Blue, yellowleg, and white) that generate more than 37,000 jobs (SAGARPA, 2013). Sonora is the main producer of shrimp in the country (Anuario 2018).
Both industrial and small-scale fleets target the species along the coastline. The project aims to work with the small-scale producers that target blue shrimp (Litopenaeus stylirostris) using gillnets in the Bahia de Lobos (Lobos bay) located on the southernmost part of the State of Sonora, in the Mexican Pacific. Finally, our project aims to follow the framework of FisheryProgress by monitoring and reporting on MSC environmental indicators, and will also be monitoring and reporting improvements on both social and financial indicators of our producers' partners, as reflected by the implementation of a triple impact workplan. 

Mexico's shrimp fishery is one of the country's most important fisheries in terms of value. Two fleets (industrial and small-scale) target three main species (Blue, yellowleg, and white) that generate more than 37,000 jobs (SAGARPA, 2013). Sonora is the main producer of shrimp in the country (Anuario 2018).

FIP at a Glance

11% 61% 25% 4%
May 01, 2022
11% 61% 25% 4%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

Not yet available
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jan 2023
Target End Date
Dec 2023

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Del Pacifico Seafoods
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Ruben Castro
Phone 
+526671010730
Organization Name 
Del Pacifico Seafoods
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Iván Pérez
Phone 
+526676458026
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
17517

Overview

The national-level Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP led by ADI will merge three site-level basic snapper-grouper FIPs (Aru, Makassar Strait, and Java Sea) and is aiming to develop solutions for snapper and grouper fishery management and other issues that can only be addressed effectively at the national level and thus will support the work of existing FIPs.

This FIP will be a comprehensive FIP and will address the objectives originally outlined in three basic FIPs as well as additional issues identified in the MSC Pre-Assessment produced by The Nature Conservancy to support the TNC Indonesia deepwater groundfish - dropline, longline, trap and gillnet FIP.   The ADI-led Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP is aligned and a complementary effort to the TNC-led snapper grouper FIP.

This FIP will focus on six snapper species (Lutjanus malabaricus, L. eryphtropterus, L. sebae, Pristipmoides multidens, P. typus and Pinjalo pinjalo) and 10 grouper species caught in Indonesian Waters (WPPs) using bottom longline, drop line, trap and gillnet.

 

The national-level Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP led by ADI will merge three site-level basic snapper-grouper FIPs (Aru, Makassar Strait, and Java Sea) and is aiming to develop solutions for snapper and grouper fishery management and other issues that can only be addressed effectively at the national level and thus will support the work of existing FIPs.

FIP at a Glance

32% 14% 54%
June 01, 2020
32% 14% 54%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Aug 2022
Target End Date
Jun 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Indonesian Demersal Association (ADI)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
M. Novi Saputra
Phone 
+62-31-99540949
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
13955

Overview

This FIP includes coastal trap nets (sea) and floating gill nets, fishing weirs (zaezdok) and beach seines (all in rivers), used to capture pink and chum salmon in the Amur River and adjacent parts of the Sea of Okhotsk (Amur Liman and Sakhalin Gulf) in the Nikolaevsk and Ulchi administrative Districts in (eastern) Russia’s Khabarovsk region. An MSC pre-assessment was completed for the fishery in 2018. The pre-assessment included four fishing companies who were interested in pursuing certification. Since completion of the pre-assessment in October 2018, two (Sakhalinskii Zaliv RK Ltd; and Amurskii Rybak) of the companies merged into the third, Amurskii Liman Ltd. One year later after another reorganization, Amurskii Liman became a new company, Shturman Ltd. As of the fall of 2019 the remaining companies, Ukhta-Prom Ltd and Shturman Ltd are now active FIP participants. These companies are not new (Ukhta-Prom Ltd since 2000 and Shturman Ltd (previously Amurkskii Liman) since 2011) to the region and have demonstrated a desire to sustain the fishing resources over the long-term to promote economic stability of the region by choosing sustainable fishing practices.

The Ukhta-Prom company is a member of the Association of Fish Industry Enterprises of the Khabarovsk Krai (region), contributing to the sustainable functioning and development of the fishery complex of the region. For several years the company has been participating in the project "Affordable Fish", helping to provide the residents of the region with fish products at affordable prices. Both companies support measures for the protection of aquatic biological resources and is in close cooperation with the Ministry of Natural Resources of the Khabarovsk Krai, the Federal Agency for Fisheries.

The only other salmon fishery, north of Nikolaevsk-na-Amure sought to achieve MSC certification in over a decade ago. In 2010, the Tugur River chum salmon fishery attempted to launch a FIP, however the project fell through due to lack of evident benefits to the fishing company and non-developed local engagement. Ukhta-Prom Ltd and Amurskii Liman are launching the first-ever comprehensive FIP on the Amur river and in wider Khabarovsk region with a goal to achieve MSC Certification. The companies currently sell their products in the Russian Federation, including the Khabarovsk Krai, Siberia, the Altai and Krasnoyarsk Krai, the Novosibirsk Region, Moscow and St. Petersburg, as well as China, Japan, and South Korea. Launching this FIP will potentially allow the fishery-clients to access new markets in North America and Europe.

According to stakeholders interviewed, illegal fishing is wide-spread in the area of the assessed fishery. Absence of information about illegal fishing significantly contribute to the low P1 scores. The management system is working towards reducing the level of illegal fishing, but it does not have quantitative information about levels and patterns of illegal fishing. Absence of such information does not allow us to assess the effectiveness of the enforcement activities.

There are 5 chum hatcheries located in the District so there are impacts to wild salmon populations due to enhancement activities. To properly manage stocks, it is necessary to know contribution of enhanced fish in the catch, escapement and hatchery broodstocks, which is usually achieved via marking of the hatchery production and sampling for marks. This approach is standard practice in most salmon fisheries with significant hatchery production. However, these practices are absent in the Amur River basin, although some efforts towards this are already undertaken.

The pre-assessment identified a number of issues that would likely prevent the fishery from achieving MSC certification in the near future:

  • Inability of the management system to adequately assess stock status of pink salmon relative to the management targets.

  • While the situation for chum is a little better due to a more developed stock assessment program, there are also problems with available information, and there is a significant hatchery program in the Amur River Basin.

  • Illegal fishing activities are known to be a problem for this area but there are no reliable estimates of the magnitude of IUU fishing.

  • There is a relatively large number of ETP species that are known to inhabit the Amur River Basin and Amur Liman, but no information about them and their interaction with the fishery and its impact on local ETP species is available.

This FIP is designed to address these issues and others identified in the pre-assessment so that the fishery can achieve MSC certification by 2025.

This FIP includes coastal trap nets (sea) and floating gill nets, fishing weirs (zaezdok) and beach seines (all in rivers), used to capture pink and chum salmon in the Amur River and adjacent parts of the Sea of Okhotsk (Amur Liman and Sakhalin Gulf) in the Nikolaevsk and Ulchi administrative Districts in (eastern) Russia’s Khabarovsk region. An MSC pre-assessment was completed for the fishery in 2018. The pre-assessment included four fishing companies who were interested in pursuing certification.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
ForSea Solutions LLC
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Natalia Novikova
Phone 
+19713319612
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
10863

Overview

Project UK is working towards an environmentally sustainable future for UK fisheries by running Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs) on 12 UK fisheries that have been selected by the UK seafood supply chain. They were selected due to their importance for the UK market.

Two species of monkfish (also called anglerfish), Lophius piscatorius and L. budegassa, are caught in an important set of fisheries in the western Channel and Western Approaches. It should be noted that the gillnet UoA is composed of (i) trammel nets (>220 mm mesh size) GTR and (ii) a combination of set gillnets (anchored) GNS, gillnets and entangling nets (not specified) GEN and gillnets (not specified) GN, all >220 mm. 

 

Although separate stocks, these are managed together through a shared TAC. ICES’ advice is provided for both species separately but only L. piscatorius has reference points and uses a precautionary, MSY approach.   ICES consider this to be a Category 3 stock where management is essentially based on recent trends, rather than well-defined harvest rules.  Under P1, this Action Plan therefore seeks to address this through better single species management, a reduction in unwanted target catch through the development of alternative management measures and the introduction of probabilistic analysis of stock assessment e.g. include confidence limits.

 

In P2, a major part of the plan is developed to improving the major weakness of the fisheries identified by the pre-assessment, the management of secondary species caught in these fisheries.  This will cover other fish as well as out of scope species such as seabirds and marine mammals, esp. for the gillnet fisheries, as well as ETPs.  The Action Plan also looks at reducing the impact of these fisheries – especially the beam trawl segment – on habitats, especially VMEs.  The plan also calls for a Scale Intensity Consequence Analysis (SICA) analysis of the impact of beam trawling on the ecosystem.

Under P3, the plan seeks the development of a fisheries -specific management plan that that includes explicit short and long-term objectives.  This should formalise the existing harvest strategy and harvest control rules for both species of anglerfish.  It also calls for external evaluation of the management of these anglerfish fisheries, possibly though a final pre-assessment before the FIP is concluded and the fisheries might be considering entering into full MSC assessment process.

 

Project UK is working towards an environmentally sustainable future for UK fisheries by running Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs) on 12 UK fisheries that have been selected by the UK seafood supply chain. They were selected due to their importance for the UK market.

FIP at a Glance

46% 50% 4%
April 01, 2017
11% 50% 36% 4%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2022
Target End Date
Apr 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Facilitated by the Marine Stewardship Council
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Jo Pollett
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
8897

Overview

The Indonesian groundfish fishery comprise 4 fishing methods, drop-line and long-line, trap and gill-net. There are an estimated  10,185 licensed vessels  operating throughout the 11 WWPP zones (June, 2020). These vessels operate across a broad range (i.e. from within the 4-nautical mile baseline the EEZ boundary, and in depths of 50 to 500 m. The fisheries are within FAO Regions 57 (the Eastern Indian Ocean) and 71 (the Western and Central Pacific Ocean).The geographical range is defined as the waters within the meridians of longitude 110° East and 140° West, and 12° South, 4° North. To the North this fishery borders the EEZs of Malaysia and Philippines, to the East, the EEZs of Papua New Guinea and East Timor, and Australia to the South.

Long-line comprises short lines carrying hooks that are attached to a longer main line at regular intervals (FAO). Longlines are laid on the bottom at depths of 50 to 150 m, with the help of small anchors or weights, and marked at the surface with flagged buoys. The lines deployed in the groundfish fishery are estimated to be between 200 to 500 hooks per set, depending on vessels size (Mous, pers com, September 2017). The bottom long-liners fish on the shelf area as well as on the top of the slopes that drop into deeper waters. Bottom long line fishing for snappers and co-occurring species is done with vessels ranging from smaller than 5 GT up to around 100 GT in Indonesian waters.

Drop-lining comprises a main line with one to 10 hooks and a weight (Mous, ibid.), held vertically in the water by hand (handline) or by manual reel. Several droplines may be operated by one fishermen or one vessel (FAO). Drop line fishers target snappers and other demersal species around structures and slopes throughout Indonesia from depths of around 30 to 50 meters on continental shelf areas, to deep slopes and seamounts 50 to 500 meters deep. Drop liners deployed in this fishery range in size from simple canoes to vessels more than 30 GT.

Trap and Gill-net fishing for snappers, groupers, emperors and co-occurring species is less widespread than the use of long line and drop line and is often done in a mixed fishery where hook and line methods are used simultaneously with the traps or gillnets. Commonly used deep water traps for snappers and groupers are made of metal frames and wiring, with the trap cages around 1.5 meters long and wide and about 0.5 to 1 meter high. Traps are usually baited and positioned near structures which are known aggregation sites for target species. Bottom gillnets are set horizontally near structures on continental shelf areas but also vertically along steep slopes and reef drop-offs, with one end tied off to rocks or coral heads on reef tops and the other end weighted and dropped several hundred meters deep, by stretching the net away from the reef over deep water before dropping it.

The size of vessels in this fishery include a broad range of vessels, including < 5 GT to > 30 GT. Fishers are licensed by permit system with MMAF responsible for licensing vessels > 30 GT, Dinas Perikanan Province, for vessels between 5 to 30 GT, and Dinas districts, for all vessels under 5 GT. Vessels are licensed annually, according to broad definitions of fishing method. However, the method and target species for vessels less than 5 GT may change according to availability of the target species. Larger vessels are known to move long distances and into different jurisdictional area, in which case, they will be required to hold several licenses. Vessels over 30 GT are only allowed to hold two concurrent WPP licenses. 

The stock assessment programme comprises a number of proxy assessments of the multi-species deepwater dropline and longline fisheries targeting snappers, groupers, emperors, and grunters, located at depths ranging from 50 to 500 metres. These proxy assessments are identified as reasonable proxies of stock biomass for the Point of Recruitment Impairment (PRI) and/or Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). There are  395 individual Units of Assessment (UoA), representing 90% of the total species numbers in the dropline fishery and 90% in the longline fishery. The expectation is that the 396 UoAs, will be separated between dropline-caught species by. management area, with each area representing single stocks. Many, of these species occur in both fisheries and in each management area.

There is presently no harvest strategy applied to these fisheries by the management authority, the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF).

The following FIP development priorities have been identified:

MSC Principle 1

Using a suite of proxies, development of agreed Performance Indicators and Reference Points to define stock status based on existing data sets (e.g. fishery-independent surveys)

Provide a sufficiently robust estimate of the removals from each stock by Indonesian fisheries other than the sub-fisheries under assessment 

Development of a harvest strategy which is responsive to the state of the stock and the elements of the harvest strategy work together towards achieving the stock management objectives of each target species fluctuating around a level consistent with MSY. 

MSC Principle 2

Provide a comprehensive table on other species catches, taken by each sub-fishery, and relating these numbers to the total catch in each fishery. This requires some elaboration of the data collection system for each of the groundfish fisheries in each WPP . Once collected, the assessment will need to review species caught, their status and vulnerability if between 2-5% of the total catch), and whether the UoA fishery is likely to impact on these stocks. From information gathered to date, this would appear to be quite unlikely.

Review whether ot not the fishery requires a shark finning strategy. Sharks caught represent less than 1% of the total catch of all species.

Review the impact of lost gears on marine habitats.

Implement a policy of non-discarding of waste, or any other synthetic or semi-synthetic organic compoundsfrom fishing vessels.

MSC Principle 3

Implement a fishery specific management plan that identifies short and long-term objectives, which are consistent with achieving the outcomes expressed by MSC’s Principles 1 (stock assessment, harvest strategies) and 2 (ecosystem management). 

Develop a comprehensive decision-making system is in place into the WPP consultative process that includes:

Develop and apply of a compliance strategy for the deepwater snapper and grouper sub-fisheries. 

Ensure that there is a fisheries specific management performance review process in place which is subject to internal and occasional external review.

 

FIP at a Glance

25% 21% 54%
July 01, 2019
36% 18% 46%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jul 2022
Target End Date
Jun 2024
Additional Impacts:
Traceability

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
The Nature Conservancy – Indonesia Fisheries Conservation Program
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Peter Mous
Email 
Phone 
61742042060
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
8201

Overview

En México, se está realizando un FIP de róbalo blanco en el Área Natural Protegida Reserva de la Biósfera Marismas Nacionales Nayarit (RBMNN). El principal objetivo de este FIP es hacer sostenible la pesca del róbalo blanco. RBMNN se ubica en el noroeste del Estado de Nayarit. Está compuesto por una gran red de lagunas costeras, bosques de manglares, marismas y deltas que representan entre el 15% y el 20% del total de los ecosistemas de manglares del país. La pesquería del róbalo blanco tiene un alto valor económico y en 2015 Nayarit fue el mayor productor del país con un total de 1,303 toneladas. Aproximadamente 435 embarcaciones participan en esta pesquería y el 90% de los pescadores utilizan redes de enmalle.

ACTUALIZACIÓN JUNIO 2022: En México, se está realizando un FIP a escala marina en el Área Natural Protegida Reserva de la Biosfera Marismas Nacionales Nayarit (RBMNN). El principal objetivo de este FIP es hacer sostenible la pesca de peces. RBMNN se ubica en el noroeste del estado de Nayarit. Está conformado por una gran red de lagunas costeras, manglares, esteros y deltas que representan entre el 15% y el 20% del total de los ecosistemas de manglares del país. Las tres principales pesquerías de peces en marismas son el robalo con una producción de 1,931 toneladas, el pargo con 684 toneladas y la corvina con 1902 toneladas según lo informado por CONAPESCA en 2020. En esta pesquería participan aproximadamente 435 embarcaciones y el 90% de los pescadores utilizan redes de enmalle y el resto use líneas de mano o anzuelos.

En el presente periodo se decidió cambiar el FIP de robalo blanco por un FIP multiespecífico con el fin de ampliar las mejoras a otras pesquerías de importancia ambiental y económica.

En México, se está realizando un FIP de róbalo blanco en el Área Natural Protegida Reserva de la Biósfera Marismas Nacionales Nayarit (RBMNN). El principal objetivo de este FIP es hacer sostenible la pesca del róbalo blanco. RBMNN se ubica en el noroeste del Estado de Nayarit.

FIP at a Glance

39% 14% 18% 29%
January 01, 2018
36% 25% 39%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

B Good Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2022
Target End Date
Jun 2025
Additional Impacts:
TraceabilityIUUOther

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Pronatura Noroeste A.C.
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Pablo Alvarez
Phone 
+526461753461 ext. 110
Organization Name 
SEDER
Organization Type 
Other
Primary Contact 
José Ignacio Herrera Montaño
Phone 
+523112580718
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
8093

Overview

The MSC certificate for this fishery was voluntarily suspended by certificate holders in light of recently renewed concerns about stock health resulting from changes in the ecosystem. The Atlantic Groundfish Council (AGC), an industry association for offshore fishery companies in Canada, has subsequently initiated a Fishery Improvement Project (FIP) that will be supported by the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP). This FIP aims to complete an action plan that includes continued compliance with, and reporting on, all conditions associated with the suspended MSC certification and will serve to guide the fishery back to MSC certification as soon as possible. The FIP action plan will include improving the stock assessment model, gaining insight into the ecosystem drivers and exploring the role of discrete components in supporting the overall stock complex.

The MSC certificate for this fishery was voluntarily suspended by certificate holders in light of recently renewed concerns about stock health resulting from changes in the ecosystem.

FIP at a Glance

11% 7% 82%
May 01, 2017
7% 29% 64%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Feb 2023
Target End Date
Apr 2023

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Atlantic Groundfish Council
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Kris Vascotto
Phone 
(902) 526-4582
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
7465

Overview

The organization APRI - whose members include over 33 of 39 seafood industry businesses and processors - covers more than 85% of purchased crab in Indonesia. All members involved are working to promote not only sustainable crab harvest, but a sustainable supply chain as well. The FIP aims to support scientific research through collaborations with Universities, to develop a national Fishery Management plan through a partnership with the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries, and to establish community based fishery management by working with local fishing communities. The FIP is meant to have a lasting impact on the sustainability of the fishery’s supply chain, on blue swimming crab resources, and also on the ecosystem where the species is harvested.

Blue swimming crab (BSC) fishing in Indonesia is mostly carried out by small-scale fishers using boats of less than 10 GT (with or without motors) and in some cases, there are fishermen who do not even use boats to harvest their catch. The crabs are mostly caught using bottom gillnets and collapsible traps. An estimated 90,000 fishermen and 185,000 pickers (who work in over 500 plants or cooking stations throughout Indonesia) are directly employed in the BSC fishery. Several thousand other players are involved in the fishery, including middlemen, processors and those who export BSC products.

The members of APRI (including what day they joined the organization), are as follows:

  • PT Bumi Menara Internusa (6/07/2007)
  • PT Kelola Mina Laut (6/07/2007)
  • PT Mutiara Laut Abadi (6/07/2007)
  • PT Prima Cakrawala Abadi (6/07/2007)
  • PT Phillips Seafood Indonesia (6/07/2007)
  • PT Pan Putra Samudera (6/07/2007)
  • Handy International, Inc (2/18/2008)
  • PT Toba Surimi Industries (3/30/2011)
  • PT Rex Canning (5/05/2011)
  • PT Graha Makmur Cipta Pratama (5/29/2013)
  • PT Sumber Mina Bahari (1/27/2014)
  • PT Muria Bahari Indonesia (2/14/2014)
  • PT Siger Jaya Abadi (3/19/2014)
  • PT Nirwana Segara (8/1/2016)
  • PT Kemilau Bintang Timur (16/12/2017)
  • PT Fresh On Time Seafood (20/01/2020)
  • PT Bahari Mulia Utama (01/05/2020)
  • PT Jala Crabindo International (10/01/2022)

The organization APRI - whose members include over 33 of 39 seafood industry businesses and processors - covers more than 85% of purchased crab in Indonesia. All members involved are working to promote not only sustainable crab harvest, but a sustainable supply chain as well. The FIP aims to support scientific research through collaborations with Universities, to develop a national Fishery Management plan through a partnership with the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries, and to establish community based fishery management by working with local fishing communities.

FIP at a Glance

36% 64%
January 01, 2012
86% 14%
Progress Rating (A) Advanced Progress

Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

(B) Good Progress

A basic FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result within 12 months.

(C) Some Recent Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has reported a Stage 3 activity within the first 12 months.
(D) Some Past Progress
  • A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months BUT has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old AND a Stage 3 activity has been reported within six months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.
(E) Negligible Progress
  • A FIP for which the most recent Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 36) months old, with no Stage 3 activity reported in the last six months.
  • A FIP younger than 12 months with no Stage 3 activity reported within 12 months.
  • A FIP 12-36 months old that has never reported a Stage 4 or 5 result AND has not reported a Stage 3 activity within the past six months.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF

A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete

This pie chart represents completed environmental actions. Non-completed environmental actions may contain completed sub-tasks that are not illustrated here. For more information on environmental action progress visit the Actions Progress tab.

  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2022
Target End Date
Dec 2022

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Asosiasi Pengelolaan Rajungan Indonesia (APRI)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Hawis Madduppa
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
5081

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