Gillnet

Overview

This FIP includes coastal trap nets (sea) and floating gill nets, fishing weirs (zaezdok) and beach seines (all in rivers), used to capture pink and chum salmon in the Amur River and adjacent parts of the Sea of Okhotsk (Amur Liman and Sakhalin Gulf) in the Nikolaevsk and Ulchi administrative Districts in (eastern) Russia’s Khabarovsk region. An MSC pre-assessment was completed for the fishery in 2018. The pre-assessment included four fishing companies who were interested in pursuing certification. Since completion of the pre-assessment in October 2018, two (Sakhalinskii Zaliv RK Ltd; and Amurskii Rybak) of the companies merged into one (Amurskii Liman Ltd). The remaining companies, Ukhta-Prom Ltd and Amurskii Liman Ltd, are now active FIP participants. These companies are not new (Ukhta-Prom Ltd since 2000 and Amurkskii Liman since 2011) to the region and have demonstrated a desire to sustain the fishing resources over the long-term to promote economic stability of the region by choosing sustainable fishing practices.

The Ukhta-Prom company is a member of the Association of Fish Industry Enterprises of the Khabarovsk Krai (region), contributing to the sustainable functioning and development of the fishery complex of the region. For several years the company has been participating in the project "Affordable Fish", helping to provide the residents of the region with fish products at affordable prices. Both companies support measures for the protection of aquatic biological resources and is in close cooperation with the Ministry of Natural Resources of the Khabarovsk Krai, the Federal Agency for Fisheries.

The only other salmon fishery, north of Nikolaevsk-na-Amure sought to achieve MSC certification in over a decade ago. In 2010, the Tugur River chum salmon fishery attempted to launch a FIP, however the project fell through due to lack of evident benefits to the fishing company and non-developed local engagement. Ukhta-Prom Ltd and Amurskii Liman are launching the first-ever comprehensive FIP on the Amur river and in wider Khabarovsk region with a goal to achieve MSC Certification. The companies currently sell their products in the Russian Federation, including the Khabarovsk Krai, Siberia, the Altai and Krasnoyarsk Krai, the Novosibirsk Region, Moscow and St. Petersburg, as well as China, Japan, and South Korea. Launching this FIP will potentially allow the fishery-clients to access new markets in North America and Europe.

According to stakeholders interviewed, illegal fishing is wide-spread in the area of the assessed fishery. Absence of information about illegal fishing significantly contribute to the low P1 scores. The management system is working towards reducing the level of illegal fishing, but it does not have quantitative information about levels and patterns of illegal fishing. Absence of such information does not allow us to assess the effectiveness of the enforcement activities.

There are 5 chum hatcheries located in the District so there are impacts to wild salmon populations due to enhancement activities. To properly manage stocks, it is necessary to know contribution of enhanced fish in the catch, escapement and hatchery broodstocks, which is usually achieved via marking of the hatchery production and sampling for marks. This approach is standard practice in most salmon fisheries with significant hatchery production. However, these practices are absent in the Amur River basin, although some efforts towards this are already undertaken.

The pre-assessment identified a number of issues that would likely prevent the fishery from achieving MSC certification in the near future:

  • Inability of the management system to adequately assess stock status of pink salmon relative to the management targets.

  • While the situation for chum is a little better due to a more developed stock assessment program, there are also problems with available information, and there is a significant hatchery program in the Amur River Basin.

  • Illegal fishing activities are known to be a problem for this area but there are no reliable estimates of the magnitude of IUU fishing.

  • There is a relatively large number of ETP species that are known to inhabit the Amur River Basin and Amur Liman, but no information about them and their interaction with the fishery and its impact on local ETP species is available.

This FIP is designed to address these issues and others identified in the pre-assessment so that the fishery can achieve MSC certification by 2025.

This FIP includes coastal trap nets (sea) and floating gill nets, fishing weirs (zaezdok) and beach seines (all in rivers), used to capture pink and chum salmon in the Amur River and adjacent parts of the Sea of Okhotsk (Amur Liman and Sakhalin Gulf) in the Nikolaevsk and Ulchi administrative Districts in (eastern) Russia’s Khabarovsk region. An MSC pre-assessment was completed for the fishery in 2018. The pre-assessment included four fishing companies who were interested in pursuing certification.

FIP at a Glance

14% 46% 39%
April 01, 2019
14% 46% 39%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2019
Target End Date
Apr 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
ForSea Solutions LLC
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Natalia Novikova
Phone 
+19713319612
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Overview

Project UK Fisheries Improvements (PUKFI) is working towards an environmentally sustainable future for UK fisheries by running Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs) on eight UK fisheries that have been selected by the UK supply chain. They were selected due to their importance for the UK market.

Two species of monkfish (also called anglerfish), Lophius piscatorius and L. budegassa, are caught in an important set of fisheries in the western Channel and Western Approaches. It should be noted that the gillnet UoA is composed of (i) trammel nets (>220 mm mesh size) GTR and (ii) a combination of set gillnets (anchored) GNS, gillnets and entangling nets (not specified) GEN and gillnets (not specified) GN, all >220 mm. 

 

Although separate stocks, these are managed together through a shared TAC. ICES’ advice is provided for both species separately but only L. piscatorius has reference points and uses a precautionary, MSY approach.   ICES consider this to be a Category 3 stock where management is essentially based on recent trends, rather than well-defined harvest rules.  Under P1, this Action Plan therefore seeks to address this through better single species management, a reduction in unwanted target catch through the development of alternative management measures and the introduction of probabilistic analysis of stock assessment e.g. include confidence limits.

 

In P2, a major part of the plan is developed to improving the major weakness of the fisheries identified by the pre-assessment, the management of secondary species caught in these fisheries.  This will cover other fish as well as out of scope species such as seabirds and marine mammals, esp. for the gillnet fisheries, as well as ETPs.  The Action Plan also looks at reducing the impact of these fisheries – especially the beam trawl segment – on habitats, especially VMEs.  The plan also calls for a Scale Intensity Consequence Analysis (SICA) analysis of the impact of beam trawling on the ecosystem.

Under P3, the plan seeks the development of a fisheries -specific management plan that that includes explicit short and long-term objectives.  This should formalise the existing harvest strategy and harvest control rules for both species of anglerfish.  It also calls for external evaluation of the management of these anglerfish fisheries, possibly though a final pre-assessment before the FIP is concluded and the fisheries might be considering entering into full MSC assessment process.

 

Project UK Fisheries Improvements (PUKFI) is working towards an environmentally sustainable future for UK fisheries by running Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs) on eight UK fisheries that have been selected by the UK supply chain. They were selected due to their importance for the UK market.

FIP at a Glance

4% 57% 36% 4%
April 01, 2017
11% 50% 36% 4%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2019
Target End Date
Apr 2022

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Facilitated by the Marine Stewardship Council
Organization Type 
Other
Primary Contact 
Jo Pollett
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Overview

The Indonesian groundfish fishery comprise 4 fishing methods, drop-line and long-line, trap and gill-net. There are anestimated significant, with an estimated 9,924 licensed vessels  operating throughout the 11 WWPP zones. These vessels operate across a broad range (i.e. from within the 4-nautical mile baseline the EEZ boundary, and in depths of 50 to 500 m. The fisheries are within FAO Regions 57 (the Eastern Indian Ocean) and 71 (the Western and Central Pacific Ocean).The geographical range is defined as the waters within the meridians of longitude 110° East and 140° West, and 12° South, 4° North. To the North this fishery borders the EEZs of Malaysia and Philippines, to the East, the EEZs of Papua New Guinea and East Timor, and Australia to the South.

Long-line comprises short lines carrying hooks that are attached to a longer main line at regular intervals (FAO). Longlines are laid on the bottom at depths of 50 to 150 m, with the help of small anchors or weights, and marked at the surface with flagged buoys. The lines deployed in the groundfish fishery are estimated to be between 200 to 500 hooks per set, depending on vessels size (Mous, pers com, September 2017). The bottom long-liners fish on the shelf area as well as on the top of the slopes that drop into deeper waters. Bottom long line fishing for snappers and co-occurring species is done with vessels ranging from smaller than 5 GT up to around 100 GT in Indonesian waters.

Drop-lining comprises a main line with one to 10 hooks and a weight (Mous, ibid.), held vertically in the water by hand (handline) or by manual reel. Several droplines may be operated by one fishermen or one vessel (FAO). Drop line fishers target snappers and other demersal species around structures and slopes throughout Indonesia from depths of around 30 to 50 meters on continental shelf areas, to deep slopes and seamounts 50 to 500 meters deep. Drop liners deployed in this fishery range in size from simple canoes to vessels more than 30 GT.

Trap and Gill-net fishing for snappers, groupers, emperors and co-occurring species is less widespread than the use of long line and drop line and is often done in a mixed fishery where hook and line methods are used simultaneously with the traps or gillnets. Commonly used deep water traps for snappers and groupers are made of metal frames and wiring, with the trap cages around 1.5 meters long and wide and about 0.5 to 1 meter high. Traps are usually baited and positioned near structures which are known aggregation sites for target species. Bottom gillnets are set horizontally near structures on continental shelf areas but also vertically along steep slopes and reef drop-offs, with one end tied off to rocks or coral heads on reef tops and the other end weighted and dropped several hundred meters deep, by stretching the net away from the reef over deep water before dropping it.

The size of vessels in this fishery include a broad range of vessels, including < 5 GT to > 30 GT. Fishers are licensed by permit system with MMAF responsible for licensing vessels > 30 GT, Dinas Perikanan Province, for vessels between 5 to 30 GT, and Dinas districts, for all vessels under 5 GT. Vessels are licensed annually, according to broad definitions of fishing method. However, the method and target species for vessels less than 5 GT may change according to availability of the target species. Larger vessels are known to move long distances and into different jurisdictional area, in which case, they will be required to hold several licenses. Vessels over 30 GT are only allowed to hold two concurrent WPP licenses. 

The stock assessment programme comprises a number of proxy assessments of the multi-species deepwater dropline and longline fisheries targeting snappers, groupers, emperors, and grunters, located at depths ranging from 50 to 500 metres. These proxy assessments are identified as reasonable proxies of stock biomass for the Point of Recruitment Impairment (PRI) and/or Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). There are 82 individual Units of Assessment (UoA), representing 90% of the total species numbers in the dropline fishery and 90% in the longline fishery. The expectation is that the 82 UoAs, will be separated between dropline-caught species by. management area, with each area representing single stocks. Many, of these species occur in both fisheries and in each management area.

There is presently no harvest strategy applied to these fisheries by the management authority, the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF).

The following FIP development priorities have been identified:

MSC Principle 1

Using a suite of proxies, development of agreed Performance Indicators and Reference Points to define stock status based on existing data sets (e.g. fishery-independent surveys)

Provide a sufficiently robust estimate of the removals from each stock by Indonesian fisheries other than the sub-fisheries under assessment 

Development of a harvest strategy which is responsive to the state of the stock and the elements of the harvest strategy work together towards achieving the stock management objectives of each target species fluctuating around a level consistent with MSY. 

MSC Principle 2

Provide a comprehensive table on other species catches, taken by each sub-fishery, and relating these numbers to the total catch in each fishery. This requires some elaboration of the data collection system for each of the groundfish fisheries in each WPP . Once collected, the assessment will need to review species caught, their status and vulnerability if between 2-5% of the total catch), and whether the UoA fishery is likely to impact on these stocks. From information gathered to date, this would appear to be quite unlikely.

Review whether ot not the fishery requires a shark finning strategy. Sharks caught represent less than 1% of the total catch of all species.

Review the impact of lost gears on marine habitats.

Implement a policy of non-discarding of waste, or any other synthetic or semi-synthetic organic compoundsfrom fishing vessels.

MSC Principle 3

Implement a fishery specific management plan that identifies short and long-term objectives, which are consistent with achieving the outcomes expressed by MSC’s Principles 1 (stock assessment, harvest strategies) and 2 (ecosystem management). 

Develop a comprehensive decision-making system is in place into the WPP consultative process that includes:

Develop and apply of a compliance strategy for the deepwater snapper and grouper sub-fisheries. 

Ensure that there is a fisheries specific management performance review process in place which is subject to internal and occasional external review.

 

FIP at a Glance

36% 14% 50%
July 01, 2019
36% 18% 46%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jan 2020
Target End Date
Jun 2024
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
The Nature Conservancy – Indonesia Fisheries Conservation Program
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Peter Mous
Email 
Phone 
61742042060
Organization Name 
Poseidon ARM PL
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Richard Banks
Phone 
61742042060
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Overview

In Mexico, a white snook FIP is being carried out in the Reserva de la Biósfera Marismas Nacionales Nayarit (RBMNN) Natural Protected Area. The main objective of this FIP is to make the white snook fishery sustainable. RBMNN is located in the northwest of Nayarit State. It is comprised of a large network of coastal lagoons, mangrove forests, marshes, and deltas that represent between 15% and 20% of the total mangrove ecosystems in the country. The white snook fishery has a high economic value and in 2015, Nayarit was the largest producer in the country with a total of 1,303 tons. Approximately 435 vessels participate in this fishery and the 90% of fishermen use gillnets.

In Mexico, a white snook FIP is being carried out in the Reserva de la Biósfera Marismas Nacionales Nayarit (RBMNN) Natural Protected Area. The main objective of this FIP is to make the white snook fishery sustainable. RBMNN is located in the northwest of Nayarit State. It is comprised of a large network of coastal lagoons, mangrove forests, marshes, and deltas that represent between 15% and 20% of the total mangrove ecosystems in the country. The white snook fishery has a high economic value and in 2015, Nayarit was the largest producer in the country with a total of 1,303 tons.

FIP at a Glance

36% 25% 39%
January 01, 2018
36% 25% 39%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
B Good Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2019
Target End Date
Dec 2023
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Pronatura Noroeste A.C.
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Pablo Alvarez
Phone 
+526461753461 ext. 110
Organization Name 
CONANP Reserva de la Biosfera Marismas Nacionales
Organization Type 
Other
Primary Contact 
Biól. Víctor Hugo Vázquez Morán
Phone 
+523232350130
Organization Name 
SEDERMA
Organization Type 
Other
Primary Contact 
Ing. María de Lourdes Bernal Acosta
Phone 
+523112580718
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Overview

The MSC certificate for this fishery was voluntarily suspended by certificate holders in light of recently renewed concerns about stock health resulting from changes in the ecosystem. The Groundfish Enterprise Allocation Council (GEAC), an industry association for offshore fishery companies in Canada, has subsequently initiated a Fishery Improvement Project (FIP) that will be supported by the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP). This FIP aims to complete an action plan that includes continued compliance with, and reporting on, all conditions associated with the suspended MSC certification and will serve to guide the fishery back to MSC certification as soon as possible. The FIP action plan will include improving the stock assessment model, gaining insight into the ecosystem drivers and exploring the role of discrete components in supporting the overall stock complex.

The MSC certificate for this fishery was voluntarily suspended by certificate holders in light of recently renewed concerns about stock health resulting from changes in the ecosystem.

FIP at a Glance

7% 21% 71%
May 01, 2017
7% 29% 64%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Feb 2020
Target End Date
Apr 2021
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Atlantic Groundfish Council
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Kris Vascotto
Phone 
1-902-526-4582
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Overview

Reason for Inactivity 
Lack of (adequate) customers to sell the product.

The principal private sector stakeholders of the FIP are organized in a formal consortium: Manoel Cordeiro (fishery operator), Fish Life (local processing and export), Blueyou Consulting (technical guidance on fishery improvement) and Blueyou Trading (European commercial partner). Together with the leading fishery scientists in Santa Catarina, São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, a proposal has been developed to conduct stock assessments and analyse catch based on a catch documentation scheme (CDS) of the gillnet fleet and samples from the trawl fleet, which can then serve as basis for fisheries management.

The monkfish stock was likely overfished in the early 2000s. The gillnet fleet has shrunk since then to only two vessels and the stock might have recovered, but trawlers continue to catch monkfish as bycatch and there is no updated stock assessment available. Providing updated stock assessments and evaluating bycatch species to derive catch limits are therefore the immediate improvement needs. In the intermediate term, the program aims to better control and monitor the activity of the trawl fleet, which severely impacts the monkfish stock.

 

The principal private sector stakeholders of the FIP are organized in a formal consortium: Manoel Cordeiro (fishery operator), Fish Life (local processing and export), Blueyou Consulting (technical guidance on fishery improvement) and Blueyou Trading (European commercial partner).

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Blueyou Consulting
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Fabian Mollet
Phone 
0041763218397
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