Area 57 (Indian Ocean, Eastern)

Overview

The FIP is targetting blue swimming crab (Portunus pelagicus) from the Palk Bay region of the Tamil Nadu coast in India.

The fishing gear is gill net (nandu valai). Each “nandu valai” is about 1000 m long with 40-50 joints and 80-100cm in height and weighs about 55 Kg. The netting is made of high-density nylon mono-filament with a stretched mesh of 90-110 mm. The head rope is nylon with a 1.5 cm in thickness and small floats are attached at intervals of about one and a half feet or marked by a flag and the footrope is with small sinkers. Each weighs about 20g and in one complete stretch of the net, a total of 350 numbers of sinkers are there weighing about 7kg in total weight (BSC FMP). The crew on each fishing boat deploying gillnets at sea, tie several nets (also called gillnet joints) end to end forming a long chain so that they cover a considerable area at sea (e.g. Devipattinam - 12 nets x 70 meters used in OBBSGN). 

The crafts involved in the fishery are classified as Outboard bottom set gillnets (OBBSGN), Nonmechanised bottom set gillnets (NMBSGN), Inboard bottom set gillnets (IBBSGN) and Outboard gillnets (OBGN) (Srinath et al., 2005). The crafts employed for gillnet operation include catamarans, plank-built boats, dugout canoes, and fiberglass coated plywood boats. Motorization of the gillnet crafts, by fitting inboard or outboard engines is also reported, and in recent years’ fiberglass boats with an overall length range of 6-10 m are more commonly used for deploying fishing gears. 

The Blue Swimming Crab (BSC) gillnet fishers in Palk Bay operate under an open-access regime that is based on a top-down management approach with several applicable laws at Federal, State & District levels. Gillnets locally called “Nandu valai” primarily target Portunus pelagicus which comprises more than 98% of the crab landings (CMFRI 2018) with the remaining 2% comprised of Portunus sanguinolentus and Charybdis natator species. BSC fishery in Palk Bay is managed by Tamil Nadu State Fisheries Department (DoF) which issues licenses for fishing boats and applies several management measures (3 days: 4 days Rule for mechanized boats, a token system for trawlers, etc.) to mitigate conflicts between various actors (fishing boats and trawlers). A good account of the management history, fishing practices, historical fishing levels, and other resource attributes in Palk Bay is provided in Stephen et al, (2013); Salagrama (2014); and CMFRI (2018) reports.  
 

The FIP is targetting blue swimming crab (Portunus pelagicus) from the Palk Bay region of the Tamil Nadu coast in India.

FIP at a Glance

39% 36% 25%
October 01, 2019
39% 36% 25%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
May 2020
Target End Date
Apr 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Crab Meat Processors Association
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Sanil Kumar S
Phone 
04652 248458; 9486488017
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

Background

Under Target 75 we are seeking to achieve 75% of global production of key seafood sectors (including both shelf-stable and fresh/frozen tuna sectors) to be either improving (i.e. in a credible FIP making adequate progress) or sustainable (i.e. MSC certified). Accordingly, there are two tactical ‘successes’ based on T75:

  • We increase the number of FIPs
  • We increase the volume of product in FIPs 
  • Strategically, our T75 analyses of tuna recommend that we move away from fishery-by-fishery FIP initiation and instead focus on larger scale (or regional) FIPs that offer economies of scale. 

Indonesia is considered the world’s largest producer of tuna and has the most abundant tuna fisheries in the world. Unsurprisingly, therefore, our T75 tuna analysis recommends a large-scale FIP in Indonesia’s EEZ as an important route for achieving T75 in fresh and frozen tuna. 

Collaborations

Several initiatives are already underway, or planned, with the goal of improving the sustainability of Indonesia’s tuna fisheries. To avoid the risk of overwhelming the local industry and government with yet another initiative, it is imperative that any strategy is sensitive to this possibility and aims to collaborate and/or build upon existing efforts. 

As such, several organizations funded by the Walton Family Foundation to work on Indonesian tuna are collaborating through a coordination platform, facilitated by Marine Change, that meets two-to-three times a year. The membership includes Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP), the International Pole and Line Foundation (IPNLF), the Indonesia Pole & Line and Handline Association (AP2HI), Masyarakat Dan Perikanan Indonesia (MDPI), WWF Indonesia, Hatfield Indonesia, and The Nature Conservancy (TNC).  

The platform has been effective in providing clarity on work areas and has enabled the members to avoid duplication. 

In addition, a major element of the coordination platform will be to collate the improvement needs for all Indonesian tuna FIPs through a National Tuna Fisheries Action Plan and work synergistically to address cross-cutting needs, including policy changes. 

SFP’s Indonesian Longline Tuna FIP

Following discussions with the coordination platform, SFP’s contribution to improving Indonesian tuna fisheries will include initiating large-scale longline tuna FIP(s). 

This will be achieved by using results from the Indonesia tuna MSC pre-assessment conducted by WWF Indonesia to identify fisheries from the units of assessments and engage with the fishers/fleet owners to explain the opportunities for fisheries improvement and potential market access/market security. 

SFP will support the initiation of each prospective longline tuna FIP in the project either directly, or through coordinating the industry funding of a technical advisor, and support the transition of prospective longline tuna FIP(s) into implementation by driving market pressure and working through the coordination platform to realize necessary policy changes. 

Furthermore, we will keep SFP’s fresh and frozen tuna market partners informed of developments with the FIP(s) via our Fresh & Frozen Tuna Supply Chain Roundtable, in order to drive improvements by Indonesian suppliers. 

UoA

Indian Ocean Bigeye tuna

Indian Ocean Yellowfin tuna

Indian Ocean  Albacore tuna

Pacific Ocean Yellowfin tuna

Pacific Ocean      Bigeye tuna

Species

Thunnus obesus

Thunnus albacares

Thunnus alalunga

Thunnus albacares

Thunnus obesus

Geographical area

Indian Ocean WPP 572 and WPP 573 in Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Indonesia and International Waters (FAO Region 57)

WPP 714 (Archipelagic Waters), and 715, 716, 717 (EEZ) (FAO 71))

Management

Local Indonesian / MMAF Management: (WPP 572, WPP 573)

International IOTC Management Resolutions.

Local Indonesian / MMAF Management: (WPP 714)

International: (WPP 716 and 717); WCPFC CMMs.

Client group

243 > 30 GT vessels.

Plus numerous <30 GT vessels.

55 > 30 GT vessels.

Plus numerous <30 GT vessels.

Other eligible fishers

All Indonesian licensed Longline vessels, operating from Indonesian ports of Benoa (Bali), Port Nizam Zachman, Cirebon and Tanjung Priok (Jakarta), Semarang, Banyuwangi, Pekalongan and Tanjung Wangi (Java), and Pontianak (West Kalimantan) and, which enter into the agreement with the client fishery.

All Indonesian licensed Longline vessels, Bitung and Ambon, which enter into the agreement with the client fishery.

 

FIP Participants include:

Asosiasi Tuna Longline Indonesia (ATLI)

PT Bali Maya Permai

PT Hatindo Makmur

PT Intimas Surya

PT Permata Marindo Jaya

PT. Sumber Mina Samudra (formerly PT. Bali Baramundi)

PT Bandar Nelayan

Background

Under Target 75 we are seeking to achieve 75% of global production of key seafood sectors (including both shelf-stable and fresh/frozen tuna sectors) to be either improving (i.e. in a credible FIP making adequate progress) or sustainable (i.e. MSC certified). Accordingly, there are two tactical ‘successes’ based on T75:

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Indonesia Longline Tuna Association (ATLI)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Ivan Jorgih
Organization Name 
Indonesia Longline Tuna Association (ATLI)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Richi Richardo
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.
Expiration Date 
July 2020

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

The Indian Ocean Albacore Tuna Longline FIP aims to improve fishing practices for longline vessels operating in the Indian Ocean that land albacore and supply Bumble Bee Foods. Bumble Bee sources albacore tuna from these vessels through the Taiwanese-founded company FCF Fishery Company, Ltd. (FCF), who acts as a broker for the fishing vessels, with Bumble Bee exporting the product to North American markets. While the target stock is healthy and management is well-document and well-implemented, the fishery lacks explicit harvest control rules and harvest strategies, which are fundamental tools to limit the risk of overfishing. Additionally, the fishery lacks independent observers, electronic monitoring, and qualitative information about bycatch, making the fishery’s effects on the surrounding ecosystem difficult to assess.

The Indian Ocean Albacore Tuna Longline FIP aims to improve fishing practices for longline vessels operating in the Indian Ocean that land albacore and supply Bumble Bee Foods. Bumble Bee sources albacore tuna from these vessels through the Taiwanese-founded company FCF Fishery Company, Ltd. (FCF), who acts as a broker for the fishing vessels, with Bumble Bee exporting the product to North American markets.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Ocean Outcomes
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Daniel Suddaby
Organization Name 
Bumble Bee Foods, LLC
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Mike Kraft
Organization Name 
Fong Chun Fishery Company, Ltd.
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Fong Lee
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.
Expiration Date 
January 2020

Overview

The Indian Ocean Tuna Longline Fishery aims to meet the rising global demand for tuna in a sustainable manner by assuring catches do not exceed sustainable levels, promoting the ecosystem based approach to fisheries management and strengthening policy and governance systems in the region. The fishery being assessed is Indian Ocean Longline Tuna, targeting albacore (Thunnus alalunga), bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) in the Indian Ocean using Malaysian flagged vessels.

Indian Ocean Tuna Longline Fishery goals:

  • Sustainable Fish Stocks – To ensure tuna and other primary species catches across the Indian Ocean do not exceed sustainable levels
  • Minimising Environmental Impacts – To promote the ecosystem based approach to fisheries management
  • Effective Management – To strengthen governance systems in the IOTC and Indian Tuna Longline fishery.

The Indian Ocean Tuna Longline Fishery aims to meet the rising global demand for tuna in a sustainable manner by assuring catches do not exceed sustainable levels, promoting the ecosystem based approach to fisheries management and strengthening policy and governance systems in the region. The fishery being assessed is Indian Ocean Longline Tuna, targeting albacore (Thunnus alalunga), bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) in the Indian Ocean using Malaysian flagged vessels.

FIP at a Glance

36% 25% 39%
December 01, 2018
36% 25% 39%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2019
Target End Date
Dec 2023

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Key Traceability
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Tom Evans
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

The Indonesian Indian Ocean yellowfin tuna handline FIP is a subset of the wider handline and pole and line FIP work, collaboratively implemented bt MDPI, IPNLF and AP2HI. The FIP has support from the Indonesian MMAF and is implemented in collaboration with provincial government and industry stakeholders.

A pole-and-line and handline tuna fisheries MSC pre-assessment was created and updated in 2018 by Hough Associates Ltd., and the FIP encompassing these UoA's are subject to regular and independent reviews. 

The yellowfin tuna handline FIP In the Indonesian Indian Ocean involves industry partners who have actively engaged with sustainability improvement projects over several years and implement various programs and improvements in their supply chains, either independently or in collaboration with organisations such as MDPI, IPNLF and AP2HI. Major activities with which industry are involved include a robust port sampling program, participation in an industry association and in provincially based co-management initiatives. Additionally, many industry partners are also engaging in inprovements related to supply chain transparency and traceability to combat IUU issues. Increasing collaboration and involvement of the government, especially the processing, marketing and competitiveness directortate is ensuring continued progress of the FIP from both an industry and a regulator perspective.

The Indonesian Indian Ocean yellowfin tuna handline FIP is a subset of the wider handline and pole and line FIP work, collaboratively implemented bt MDPI, IPNLF and AP2HI. The FIP has support from the Indonesian MMAF and is implemented in collaboration with provincial government and industry stakeholders.

A pole-and-line and handline tuna fisheries MSC pre-assessment was created and updated in 2018 by Hough Associates Ltd., and the FIP encompassing these UoA's are subject to regular and independent reviews. 

FIP at a Glance

4% 39% 57%
June 01, 2018
4% 39% 57%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Nov 2019
Target End Date
Jun 2023
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
MDPI
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Deirdre Duggan
Phone 
006281139603079
Organization Name 
IPNLF
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Martin Purves
Phone 
0027833245828
Organization Name 
AP2HI
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Abdul Muis
Phone 
006281213845878
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

The International Pole & Line Foundation (IPNLF) and Asosiasi Perikanan Pole & Line Dan Handline Indonesia (AP2HI), are working together to drive this FIP, along with partners such as the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF), and Yayasan Masyarakat dan Perikanan Indonesia (MDPI). An assessment was conducted on AP2HI member supply-chains that identified at least 14 Units of Assessment (UoAs) for Indonesian one-by-one tuna fisheries to move towards MSC certification. 

A FIP Steering Committee focusing on pole & line and handline tuna fisheries was established in May 2016 via a decree issued by the Director of Fishery Resource Management, MMAF. The FIP Steering Committee meets regularly and provides a vehicle for cross-sector collaboration to achieve sustainability objectives. Both AP2HI and IPNLF have signed commitments (2018) with MMAF to move Indonesia's one-by-one tuna fisheries towards eco-certification and demonstrate fishery and industry best practices.  A pole-and-line and handline tuna fisheries MSC pre-assessment was created and updated in 2018 by Hough Associates Ltd., and the FIP encompassing these UoA's are subject to regular and independent reviews. 

Indonesia has a long tradition of catching tuna using pole & line. Through the FIP, AP2HI, IPNLF, and MDPI are committed to promoting and supporting these fisheries, which are widely regarded as the most ecologically and socially responsible method to harvest tuna. Pole-and-line fisheries are typically ‘green-rated' by NGOs and form a core component of many major buyers’ sourcing commitments.

The International Pole & Line Foundation (IPNLF) and Asosiasi Perikanan Pole & Line Dan Handline Indonesia (AP2HI), are working together to drive this FIP, along with partners such as the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF), and Yayasan Masyarakat dan Perikanan Indonesia (MDPI). An assessment was conducted on AP2HI member supply-chains that identified at least 14 Units of Assessment (UoAs) for Indonesian one-by-one tuna fisheries to move towards MSC certification. 

FIP at a Glance

4% 39% 57%
November 01, 2017
4% 39% 57%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Mar 2020
Target End Date
Jun 2023
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
International Pole & Line Foundation
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Martin Purves
Organization Name 
Asosiasi Perikanan Pole & Line dan Handline Indonesia
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Abdul Muis Sulaiman
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

The International Pole & Line Foundation (IPNLF) and Asosiasi Perikanan Pole & Line Dan Handline Indonesia (AP2HI), are working together to drive this FIP, along with partners such as the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF), and Yayasan Masyarakat dan Perikanan Indonesia (MDPI). An assessment was conducted on AP2HI member supply-chains that identified at least 14 Units of Assessment (UoAs) for Indonesian one-by-one tuna fisheries to move towards MSC certification. 

A FIP Steering Committee focussing on pole & line and handline tuna fisheries was established in May 2016 via a decree issued by the Director of Fishery Resource Management, MMAF. The FIP Steering Committee meets regularly and provides a vehicle for cross-sector collaboration to achieve sustainability objectives. Both AP2HI and IPNLF have signed commitments (2018) with MMAF to move Indonesia's one-by-one tuna fisheries towards eco-certification and demonstrate fishery and industry best practices.  A pole-and-line and handline tuna fisheries MSC pre-assessment was created and updated in 2018 by Hough Associates Ltd., and the FIP encompassing these UoA's are subject to regular and independent reviews. 

Indonesia has a long tradition of catching tuna using pole & line. Through the FIP, AP2HI, IPNLF, and MDPI are committed to promoting and supporting these fisheries, which are widely regarded as the most ecologically and socially responsible method to harvest tuna. Pole-and-line fisheries are typically ‘green-rated' by NGOs and form a core component of many major buyers’ sourcing commitments.

The International Pole & Line Foundation (IPNLF) and Asosiasi Perikanan Pole & Line Dan Handline Indonesia (AP2HI), are working together to drive this FIP, along with partners such as the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF), and Yayasan Masyarakat dan Perikanan Indonesia (MDPI). An assessment was conducted on AP2HI member supply-chains that identified at least 14 Units of Assessment (UoAs) for Indonesian one-by-one tuna fisheries to move towards MSC certification. 

FIP at a Glance

28% 72%
November 01, 2017
28% 72%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Mar 2020
Target End Date
Jun 2023
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
International Pole & Line Foundation
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Martin Purves
Organization Name 
Asosiasi Perikanan Pole & Line dan Handline Indonesia
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Abdul Muis Sulaiman
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

The Indonesian groundfish fishery comprise 4 fishing methods, drop-line and long-line, trap and gill-net. There are anestimated significant, with an estimated 9,924 licensed vessels  operating throughout the 11 WWPP zones. These vessels operate across a broad range (i.e. from within the 4-nautical mile baseline the EEZ boundary, and in depths of 50 to 500 m. The fisheries are within FAO Regions 57 (the Eastern Indian Ocean) and 71 (the Western and Central Pacific Ocean).The geographical range is defined as the waters within the meridians of longitude 110° East and 140° West, and 12° South, 4° North. To the North this fishery borders the EEZs of Malaysia and Philippines, to the East, the EEZs of Papua New Guinea and East Timor, and Australia to the South.

Long-line comprises short lines carrying hooks that are attached to a longer main line at regular intervals (FAO). Longlines are laid on the bottom at depths of 50 to 150 m, with the help of small anchors or weights, and marked at the surface with flagged buoys. The lines deployed in the groundfish fishery are estimated to be between 200 to 500 hooks per set, depending on vessels size (Mous, pers com, September 2017). The bottom long-liners fish on the shelf area as well as on the top of the slopes that drop into deeper waters. Bottom long line fishing for snappers and co-occurring species is done with vessels ranging from smaller than 5 GT up to around 100 GT in Indonesian waters.

Drop-lining comprises a main line with one to 10 hooks and a weight (Mous, ibid.), held vertically in the water by hand (handline) or by manual reel. Several droplines may be operated by one fishermen or one vessel (FAO). Drop line fishers target snappers and other demersal species around structures and slopes throughout Indonesia from depths of around 30 to 50 meters on continental shelf areas, to deep slopes and seamounts 50 to 500 meters deep. Drop liners deployed in this fishery range in size from simple canoes to vessels more than 30 GT.

Trap and Gill-net fishing for snappers, groupers, emperors and co-occurring species is less widespread than the use of long line and drop line and is often done in a mixed fishery where hook and line methods are used simultaneously with the traps or gillnets. Commonly used deep water traps for snappers and groupers are made of metal frames and wiring, with the trap cages around 1.5 meters long and wide and about 0.5 to 1 meter high. Traps are usually baited and positioned near structures which are known aggregation sites for target species. Bottom gillnets are set horizontally near structures on continental shelf areas but also vertically along steep slopes and reef drop-offs, with one end tied off to rocks or coral heads on reef tops and the other end weighted and dropped several hundred meters deep, by stretching the net away from the reef over deep water before dropping it.

The size of vessels in this fishery include a broad range of vessels, including < 5 GT to > 30 GT. Fishers are licensed by permit system with MMAF responsible for licensing vessels > 30 GT, Dinas Perikanan Province, for vessels between 5 to 30 GT, and Dinas districts, for all vessels under 5 GT. Vessels are licensed annually, according to broad definitions of fishing method. However, the method and target species for vessels less than 5 GT may change according to availability of the target species. Larger vessels are known to move long distances and into different jurisdictional area, in which case, they will be required to hold several licenses. Vessels over 30 GT are only allowed to hold two concurrent WPP licenses. 

The stock assessment programme comprises a number of proxy assessments of the multi-species deepwater dropline and longline fisheries targeting snappers, groupers, emperors, and grunters, located at depths ranging from 50 to 500 metres. These proxy assessments are identified as reasonable proxies of stock biomass for the Point of Recruitment Impairment (PRI) and/or Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). There are 82 individual Units of Assessment (UoA), representing 90% of the total species numbers in the dropline fishery and 90% in the longline fishery. The expectation is that the 82 UoAs, will be separated between dropline-caught species by. management area, with each area representing single stocks. Many, of these species occur in both fisheries and in each management area.

There is presently no harvest strategy applied to these fisheries by the management authority, the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF).

The following FIP development priorities have been identified:

MSC Principle 1

Using a suite of proxies, development of agreed Performance Indicators and Reference Points to define stock status based on existing data sets (e.g. fishery-independent surveys)

Provide a sufficiently robust estimate of the removals from each stock by Indonesian fisheries other than the sub-fisheries under assessment 

Development of a harvest strategy which is responsive to the state of the stock and the elements of the harvest strategy work together towards achieving the stock management objectives of each target species fluctuating around a level consistent with MSY. 

MSC Principle 2

Provide a comprehensive table on other species catches, taken by each sub-fishery, and relating these numbers to the total catch in each fishery. This requires some elaboration of the data collection system for each of the groundfish fisheries in each WPP . Once collected, the assessment will need to review species caught, their status and vulnerability if between 2-5% of the total catch), and whether the UoA fishery is likely to impact on these stocks. From information gathered to date, this would appear to be quite unlikely.

Review whether ot not the fishery requires a shark finning strategy. Sharks caught represent less than 1% of the total catch of all species.

Review the impact of lost gears on marine habitats.

Implement a policy of non-discarding of waste, or any other synthetic or semi-synthetic organic compoundsfrom fishing vessels.

MSC Principle 3

Implement a fishery specific management plan that identifies short and long-term objectives, which are consistent with achieving the outcomes expressed by MSC’s Principles 1 (stock assessment, harvest strategies) and 2 (ecosystem management). 

Develop a comprehensive decision-making system is in place into the WPP consultative process that includes:

Develop and apply of a compliance strategy for the deepwater snapper and grouper sub-fisheries. 

Ensure that there is a fisheries specific management performance review process in place which is subject to internal and occasional external review.

 

FIP at a Glance

36% 14% 50%
July 01, 2019
36% 18% 46%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jan 2020
Target End Date
Jun 2024
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
The Nature Conservancy – Indonesia Fisheries Conservation Program
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Peter Mous
Email 
Phone 
61742042060
Organization Name 
Poseidon ARM PL
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Richard Banks
Phone 
61742042060
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

History: In April 2017, a new fishery improvement project (FIP) for Sri Lanka’s longline fishery was launched at the Seafood Expo Global in Brussels (Belgium) by the President of the Seafood Exporters’ Association of Sri Lanka (SEASL) Prabhash Subasinghe. In May the SEASL signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Minister of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Development, the Honourable Mahinda Amaraweera MP, to improve the biological and ecological status of Sri Lanka’s longline fishery. The MoU also commits the parties to implement fishery-specific management measures that will maintain the status of the fishery at a level consistent with a sustainably managed fishery. In July pelagikos pvt ltd was appointed to administer and manage, design, plan, monitor and evaluate the new FIP. The progress made by the FIP to improve the Sri Lankan longline fishery since July, is presented in this the first FIP bulletin.

In July, the SEASL commissioned a Gap Analysis to establish the scope of the new longline fishery improvement project and to internally assess with members of the new FIP, the status of the fishery / fisheries against the Marine Stewardship Council's (MSC) Fishery Standard. The Gap Analysis Final Report was submitted to the SEASL by pelagikos pvt ltd at the end of April 2018. In November 2017 the SEASL commissioned a pre assessment of the longline fishery against by the MSC Fishery Standard by a Certified Assessment Body (CAB). The CAB pre assessment report was submitted to the SEASL in March 2018. The CAB pre assessment was co-financed by the SEASL and New England Seafood International Pvt Ltd.

Context: The new FIP is a collaboration between Sri Lanka’s leading seafood manufacturers, the government’s regulatory and export authorities, boat owners' associations, skippers and their crew. Representatives of these associations, agencies and authorities comprise the decision making ‘members’ of the new Sri Lankan longline FIP.   The first Steering Committee was convened by the Secretary to the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Development (MFARD) at the end of July 2017. ‘Focal points’ were appointed by each member of the new FIP. The scope of the new FIP was discussed and agreed in the second Steering Committee meeting held in October 2017. In this meeting, the immediate opportunities (including certification) and challenges that need to be overcome to further improve Sri Lanka’s longline fishery were presented and discussed.

Scope: In 2016, Sri Lankan vessels harvested 77,029.24 metric tonnes of tuna (86%) and billfish (14%) from Sri Lanka’s Exclusvie Economic Zone (EEZ) and international waters, using gillnets, longlines, ring nets, handlines and trolling lines according to the National Aquatic Resources, Research and Development Agency (NARA). Key species included skipjack, yellowfin, bigeye and albacore tuna, together with indo-pacific sailfish, swordfish and black, blue and striped marlin. The scope of the new FIP was determined based on the consideration of the following three factors:

(1) The export demand for fresh and frozen tuna and billfish products.

(2) The types of vessels and gears supplying tuna and billfish for export.

(3) The current and short-term status of key export species.

Sri Lanka’s fresh and frozen seafood export industry is driven by demand for yellowfin tuna products. Demand for bigeye, indo-pacific sailfish, swordfish and marlin products is also important to the industry. Artisanal (<15m) and semi-industrial (<24 m) multiday fishing boats, deploying short (500 – 1,500 hooks) longlines are the main source of tuna and billfish for Sri Lankan exporters. 498 longline multiday boats were registered to fish within and beyond Sri Lanka’s EEZ in 2017. 80% of these vessels were registered under the District Fisheries Offices in Chilaw (Thodduwawa and Wennappuwa) and Negombo. A further 300 or so longline multiday boats  were registered for the EEZ only. IOTC stock assessments indicate that bigeye tuna and swordfish stocks are currently fished at a level consistent with a sustinably managed fishery (Green).  The yellowfin tuna stock is judged to be overfished and subject to overfishing (Red). However, interim reference points and harvest control rules are in place to ensure that the stock recovers within the next three years. Sailfish and blue marlin stocks are overfished or subject to overfishing (Orange). Black and striped marlin stocks are judged to be overfished and subject to overfishing (Red). The absence of reference points for these species means it is unlikely stocks will recover within the next three years. Based on the new Sri Lankan Longline FIP’s internal assessment, members of the FIP agreed the scope of the new Sri Lanka FIP to be

Geographic           Sri Lanka’s Exclusive Economic Zone & International Waters in the Indian Ocean

Vessel Type           Sri Lankan multiday fishing boats registered to fish in the EEZ or High Seas

Gear Type             Short longline (500 – 1,500 hooks)

Target Species      Yellowfin Tuna, Bigeye Tuna, Swordfish

History: In April 2017, a new fishery improvement project (FIP) for Sri Lanka’s longline fishery was launched at the Seafood Expo Global in Brussels (Belgium) by the President of the Seafood Exporters’ Association of Sri Lanka (SEASL) Prabhash Subasinghe. In May the SEASL signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Minister of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Development, the Honourable Mahinda Amaraweera MP, to improve the biological and ecological status of Sri Lanka’s longline fishery.

FIP at a Glance

7% 57% 36%
April 01, 2018
7% 57% 36%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2019
Target End Date
Mar 2021
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
pelagikos private limited
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Steve Creech
Phone 
0094773583135
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

The organization APRI - whose members include over 33 of 39 seafood industry businesses and processors - covers more than 85% of purchased crab in Indonesia. All members involved are working to promote not only sustainable crab harvest, but a sustainable supply chain as well. The FIP aims to support scientific research through collaborations with Universities, to develop a national Fishery Management plan through a partnership with the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries, and to establish community based fishery management by working with local fishing communities. The FIP is meant to have a lasting impact on the sustainability of the fishery’s supply chain, on blue swimming crab resources, and also on the ecosystem where the species is harvested.

Blue swimming crab (BSC) fishing in Indonesia is mostly carried out by small-scale fishers using boats of less than 10 GT (with or without motors) and in some cases, there are fishermen who do not even use boats to harvest their catch. The crabs are mostly caught using bottom gillnets and collapsible traps. An estimated 90,000 fishermen and 185,000 pickers (who work in over 500 plants or cooking stations throughout Indonesia) are directly employed in the BSC fishery. Several thousand other players are involved in the fishery, including middlemen, processors and those who export BSC products.

The members of APRI (including what day they joined the organization), are as follows:

  • PT Bumi Menara Internusa (6/07/2007)
  • Blue Star Foods (6/07/2007)
  • PT Kelola Mina Laut (6/07/2007)
  • PT Mutiara Laut Abadi (6/07/2007)
  • PT Prima Cakrawala Abadi (6/07/2007)
  • PT Phillips Seafood Indonesia (6/07/2007)
  • PT Pan Putra Samudera (6/07/2007)
  • Handy International, Inc (2/18/2008)
  • PT Toba Surimi Industries (3/30/2011)
  • PT Rex Canning (5/05/2011)
  • PT Graha Makmur Cipta Pratama (5/29/2013)
  • PT Sumber Mina Bahari (1/27/2014)
  • PT Muria Bahari Indonesia (2/14/2014)
  • PT Siger Jaya Abadi (3/19/2014)
  • PT. Nirwana Segara (8/1/2016)
  • PT. Kemilau Bintang Timur (16/12/2017)

The organization APRI - whose members include over 33 of 39 seafood industry businesses and processors - covers more than 85% of purchased crab in Indonesia. All members involved are working to promote not only sustainable crab harvest, but a sustainable supply chain as well. The FIP aims to support scientific research through collaborations with Universities, to develop a national Fishery Management plan through a partnership with the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries, and to establish community based fishery management by working with local fishing communities.

FIP at a Glance

11% 46% 43%
January 01, 2012
86% 14%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Mar 2020
Target End Date
Dec 2022
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Asosiasi Pengelolaan Rajungan Indonesia (APRI)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Hawis Madduppa
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

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