Longline

Overview

The EU surface longline fleet has been concentrating efforts on the implementation of national and regional strategies for the conservation of their target species including measures such as minimizing incidental catches, collaborating with the scientific community, and finning bans.

In 2014, an MSC pre-assessment was conducted for all swordfish and blue shark stocks, and in 2016, the fishery was close to meeting the MSC standard for north and south Atlantic swordfish. Focus on improvements for all the fleet operations moved towards promoting the creation of a FIP for all swordfish (Xiphias gladius ) and blue shark (Prionace glauca ) stocks for the North and South Atlantic Ocean, the Western and Central Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean.

The industry community recently created the ANECTEAM association to work together with the EU surface longline fleet. ANECTEAM is focused on getting visibility and recognition from the consumers, raising public and environmental NGO opinions about efforts to boost sustainability, encouraging distribution chains to purchase the fishery's products, and increasing recognition at the international level of a sustainable industry and fleet that is allowed to trade in fins and shark meat. This FIP represents 4 shipowners' associations (90 % catches EU fleet), 14 supply chain companies (80 % UE), and 160 fishing vessels (95% of EU fishing vessels in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans).

Due to their migratory nature and extensive distribution throughout several oceans, the management of swordfish and blue shark is carried out internationally by RFMOs (ICCAT, IOTC, IATTC, and WCPFC) through a system of catch totals (TAC)

Based on the MSC pre-assessment for the North and South Atlantic Spanish longline fishery in 2014 and a MSC full assessment in 2016 for swordfish, previously conducted, the scoring was updated in 2019 following the last MSC standard 2018; new scoring was also carried out for blue shark according to last ICCAT assessment for BSH conducted in 2015 -edited in 2017- and mako shark for Principe 2 in 2017 (see full information in the Scoping Doc). A number of Performance Indicators (Pis) were scored so that the fishery would fail under a full MSC assessment (SG <60) and required conditions for other PIs (SG 60-79). The general objective is to increase the PIs (scored <60 or 60-79) to SG>80.

The FIP Blues has been originally designed to be implemented in three oceans: Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian. The present FIP will start by implementing the actions in the Atlantic ocean since the full MSC Assesment was focused on these fisheries, both north and south stocks. At the same time, in the subsequent years after the beginning of the tasks for the Atlantic, we will develop the Work Plan Action for the other oceans´ swordfish and blue shark fisheries.

The EU surface longline fleet has been concentrating efforts on the implementation of national and regional strategies for the conservation of their target species including measures such as minimizing incidental catches, collaborating with the scientific community, and finning bans.

FIP at a Glance

7% 32% 61%
October 01, 2019
7% 32% 61%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
May 2020
Target End Date
Dec 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
ANECTEAM (Asociación Nacional de Empresas Comercializadoras y Transformadores de Especies Altamente Migratorias)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Emilio Martínez
Phone 
+34 986 243 480
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

The fishery being assessed is comprised of pelagic longline vessels that target albacore tuna with incidental catch of bigeye and yellowfin tunas, fishing on the high seas of the Pacific Ocean. The agent vessels are managed by the Liancheng Overseas Fishery (Shenzhen) Company, and are flagged to China, Taiwan, the Federated States of Micronesia and Fiji. From time to time and where permitted, the vessels may fish in national EEZs including Cook Islands, FSM, Fiji, and Vanuatu. It is assumed in this pre-assessment that management within these EEZs is at least equal to the high seas.

The fishery being assessed is comprised of pelagic longline vessels that target albacore tuna with incidental catch of bigeye and yellowfin tunas, fishing on the high seas of the Pacific Ocean. The agent vessels are managed by the Liancheng Overseas Fishery (Shenzhen) Company, and are flagged to China, Taiwan, the Federated States of Micronesia and Fiji. From time to time and where permitted, the vessels may fish in national EEZs including Cook Islands, FSM, Fiji, and Vanuatu. It is assumed in this pre-assessment that management within these EEZs is at least equal to the high seas.

FIP at a Glance

11% 43% 46%
September 01, 2019
11% 43% 46%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Mar 2020
Target End Date
Sep 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Key Traceability Ltd.
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Tom Evans
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

Background

Under Target 75 we are seeking to achieve 75% of global production of key seafood sectors (including both shelf-stable and fresh/frozen tuna sectors) to be either improving (i.e. in a credible FIP making adequate progress) or sustainable (i.e. MSC certified). Accordingly, there are two tactical ‘successes’ based on T75:

  • We increase the number of FIPs
  • We increase the volume of product in FIPs 
  • Strategically, our T75 analyses of tuna recommend that we move away from fishery-by-fishery FIP initiation and instead focus on larger scale (or regional) FIPs that offer economies of scale. 

Indonesia is considered the world’s largest producer of tuna and has the most abundant tuna fisheries in the world. Unsurprisingly, therefore, our T75 tuna analysis recommends a large-scale FIP in Indonesia’s EEZ as an important route for achieving T75 in fresh and frozen tuna. 

Collaborations

Several initiatives are already underway, or planned, with the goal of improving the sustainability of Indonesia’s tuna fisheries. To avoid the risk of overwhelming the local industry and government with yet another initiative, it is imperative that any strategy is sensitive to this possibility and aims to collaborate and/or build upon existing efforts. 

As such, several organizations funded by the Walton Family Foundation to work on Indonesian tuna are collaborating through a coordination platform, facilitated by Marine Change, that meets two-to-three times a year. The membership includes Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP), the International Pole and Line Foundation (IPNLF), the Indonesia Pole & Line and Handline Association (AP2HI), Masyarakat Dan Perikanan Indonesia (MDPI), WWF Indonesia, Hatfield Indonesia, and The Nature Conservancy (TNC).  

The platform has been effective in providing clarity on work areas and has enabled the members to avoid duplication. 

In addition, a major element of the coordination platform will be to collate the improvement needs for all Indonesian tuna FIPs through a National Tuna Fisheries Action Plan and work synergistically to address cross-cutting needs, including policy changes. 

SFP’s Indonesian Longline Tuna FIP

Following discussions with the coordination platform, SFP’s contribution to improving Indonesian tuna fisheries will include initiating large-scale longline tuna FIP(s). 

This will be achieved by using results from the Indonesia tuna MSC pre-assessment conducted by WWF Indonesia to identify fisheries from the units of assessments and engage with the fishers/fleet owners to explain the opportunities for fisheries improvement and potential market access/market security. 

SFP will support the initiation of each prospective longline tuna FIP in the project either directly, or through coordinating the industry funding of a technical advisor, and support the transition of prospective longline tuna FIP(s) into implementation by driving market pressure and working through the coordination platform to realize necessary policy changes. 

Furthermore, we will keep SFP’s fresh and frozen tuna market partners informed of developments with the FIP(s) via our Fresh & Frozen Tuna Supply Chain Roundtable, in order to drive improvements by Indonesian suppliers. 

UoA

Indian Ocean Bigeye tuna

Indian Ocean Yellowfin tuna

Indian Ocean  Albacore tuna

Pacific Ocean Yellowfin tuna

Pacific Ocean      Bigeye tuna

Species

Thunnus obesus

Thunnus albacares

Thunnus alalunga

Thunnus albacares

Thunnus obesus

Geographical area

Indian Ocean WPP 572 and WPP 573 in Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Indonesia and International Waters (FAO Region 57)

WPP 714 (Archipelagic Waters), and 715, 716, 717 (EEZ) (FAO 71))

Management

Local Indonesian / MMAF Management: (WPP 572, WPP 573)

International IOTC Management Resolutions.

Local Indonesian / MMAF Management: (WPP 714)

International: (WPP 716 and 717); WCPFC CMMs.

Client group

243 > 30 GT vessels.

Plus numerous <30 GT vessels.

55 > 30 GT vessels.

Plus numerous <30 GT vessels.

Other eligible fishers

All Indonesian licensed Longline vessels, operating from Indonesian ports of Benoa (Bali), Port Nizam Zachman, Cirebon and Tanjung Priok (Jakarta), Semarang, Banyuwangi, Pekalongan and Tanjung Wangi (Java), and Pontianak (West Kalimantan) and, which enter into the agreement with the client fishery.

All Indonesian licensed Longline vessels, Bitung and Ambon, which enter into the agreement with the client fishery.

 

FIP Participants include:

Asosiasi Tuna Longline Indonesia (ATLI)

PT Bali Maya Permai

PT Hatindo Makmur

PT Intimas Surya

PT Permata Marindo Jaya

PT. Sumber Mina Samudra (formerly PT. Bali Baramundi)

PT Bandar Nelayan

Background

Under Target 75 we are seeking to achieve 75% of global production of key seafood sectors (including both shelf-stable and fresh/frozen tuna sectors) to be either improving (i.e. in a credible FIP making adequate progress) or sustainable (i.e. MSC certified). Accordingly, there are two tactical ‘successes’ based on T75:

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Indonesia Longline Tuna Association (ATLI)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Ivan Jorgih
Organization Name 
Indonesia Longline Tuna Association (ATLI)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Richi Richardo
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.
Expiration Date 
July 2020

Overview

The Western and Central Pacific albacore and yellowfin tuna longline FIP aims to improve fishing practices for longline vessels operating in the Pacific Ocean that land albacore in Fiji and supply Bumble Bee Foods. Bumble Bee sources albacore tuna from these vessels through the Taiwanese-founded company FCF Fishery Company, Ltd. (FCF), much of which is canned and exported to North American markets. While the fishery’s target stocks are healthy and management is well-documented and well-implemented, the fishery lacks independent observers, electronic monitoring, qualitative information about bycatch, and explicit harvest control rules and harvest strategies which are fundamental tools used to limit the risk of overfishing.

The Western and Central Pacific albacore and yellowfin tuna longline FIP aims to improve fishing practices for longline vessels operating in the Pacific Ocean that land albacore in Fiji and supply Bumble Bee Foods. Bumble Bee sources albacore tuna from these vessels through the Taiwanese-founded company FCF Fishery Company, Ltd. (FCF), much of which is canned and exported to North American markets.

FIP at a Glance

4% 39% 57%
June 01, 2019
4% 39% 57%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2019
Target End Date
Jun 2024
Some FIPs include objectives that go beyond the 28 indicators. Clicking on the links below will provide additional detail on other impacts the FIP is working to achieve.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Ocean Outcomes
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Daniel Suddaby
Organization Name 
FCF Fishery Co. Ltd. Industry
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Fong Lee
Organization Name 
Bumble Bee Foods, LLC
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Mike Kraft
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

The multi-species longline fishery targeting highly migratory large pelagic species as tuna, swordfish and mahi mahi, is of crucial environmental, social and economic importance in Costa Rica for coastal livelihoods and the processing and export industries. It is the most relevant seafood sector in the country for the international markets; specifically, the US, which imports 80% of the landed volume. Additionally, domestic consumption of these three species has increased recently. Costa Rican commercial fleet mainly uses surface longline as fishing gear and complementary a fiberglass pole is carrying on for green stick fishing. Approximately, 350 vessels are registered, ranging from 12 m to 25 m in length, denominated medium and advance. The main Pacific fishing communities for these species are Cuajiniquil, Puntarenas, Quepos and Golfito. This is a national FIP that encompasses the total medium and advance-type longline vessels fishing in the Pacific Ocean.

Several species of tunas, billfishes and sharks, among others, are primary and secondary species, and olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) is the most abundance endangered, threatened and protected species (ETP) of this fishery.

INCOPESCA is the institution that manages, regulates and promotes the development of the fishing and aquaculture sector with an ecosystem approach, under the principles of sustainability, social responsibility and competitiveness. The National Coast Guard System (SNG) is responsible for monitoring and surveillance at sea.

The main regulation instrument is the Fisheries and Aquaculture Law No. 8436 of 2005 and its Norm. INCOPESCA's highest institutional authority is the Board of Directors (Law 7384, the law creating the Costa Rican Institute of Fisheries and Aquaculture) and its purpose is to direct and establish institutional policies for compliance with the laws governing the country's fisheries and aquaculture. Executive Decree No. 38681 MAG-MINAE for the management of tuna and tuna-like species in the Exclusive Economic Zone of the Costa Rican Pacific Ocean establishes zoning and regulation for these species. The National Fisheries and Aquaculture Development Plan guides this sector.

Costa Rica is a member of the Organization of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Sector of the Central American Isthmus (OSPESCA), the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (CIAT) and the Inter-American Convention on the Protection and Conservation of Sea Turtles (IAC), which establishes binding resolutions and conservation measures in the country.

To improve the sustainability performance of this fishery, an alliance between Costa Rican Fishery and Aquaculture Institute (INCOPESCA), Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (MAG), producers, exporters, a group of US supply chain actors, and United Nation Development Program (UNDP) along with fisheries in Costa Rica have come together to start a Fishery Improvement Project. FIP will be led in country and receive support from market chain actors.

Lead FIP participants from Costa Rica are organized under a FIP working group included in the National Sustainable Fishery Platform for Large Pelagic, a multi-stakeholder dialogue forum facilitated by UNDP and participated by all national stakeholders linked to the large pelagic fisheries in country. The National FIP working group that will lead implementation of the project is composed by:

  • Costa Rican Fishery and Aquaculture Institute (INCOPESCA)
  • Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (MAG)
  • National Longline Fishing Sector: Cámara Nacional de la Industria Palangrera (CNIP); Cámara de pescadores artesanales de Puntarenas (CAPAP); Cámara de pescadores de Quepos; Cámara de pescadores de Guanacaste; Cámara de pescadores de Golfito; CAMAPUN; UNIPESCA. 
  • Exporters Association- CANEPP Cámara Nacional de Exportadores de Productos Pesqueros y Acuícolas (CANEPP)
  • MARTEC
  • FRUMAR
  • UNDP

Participants from the Supply Chain have organized under a Market Support Group. As such, US participants in the FIP, provide assistance to the project through financial support arising from a percentage of the sales. Market Support Group is formed by:

  • Chefs Trading
  • Trinity Seafood
  • Seattle Fish Company
  • Frequentz

The National Sustainable Fishery Platform for Large Pelagic is an initiative framed within the UNDP’s International Green Commodities Programme and the Global Sustainable Supply Chains for Marine Commodities, a joint programme implemented by UNDP and the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP), who has provided support and technical advice during FIP development.

The multi-species longline fishery targeting highly migratory large pelagic species as tuna, swordfish and mahi mahi, is of crucial environmental, social and economic importance in Costa Rica for coastal livelihoods and the processing and export industries. It is the most relevant seafood sector in the country for the international markets; specifically, the US, which imports 80% of the landed volume. Additionally, domestic consumption of these three species has increased recently.

FIP at a Glance

43% 25% 29% 4%
April 01, 2019
43% 25% 29% 4%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jan 2020
Target End Date
Apr 2023

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
United National Development Program (UNDP)
Organization Type 
Other
Primary Contact 
Sandra Andraka
Phone 
+506 83650845
Organization Name 
Organizaciones Pesqueras del Sector Palangrero Nacional
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Mauricio González
Organization Name 
Cámara Nacional de la Industria Palangrera (CNIP)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Robert Nunes
Organization Name 
Cámara Nacional de Exportadores de Productos Pesqueros y Acuícolas (CANEPP)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Ana Victoria Paniagua
Email 
Organization Name 
Instituto Costarricense de Pesca y Acuicultura (INCOPESCA) - Government
Organization Type 
Other
Primary Contact 
Alvaro Otárola / José Miguel Carvajal
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

Afritex is an investment holding company with strategic interests in African based fishing operations that markets seafood to a global base of customers. Through its subsidiary companies, Afritex operates two longline tuna and swordfish operations – (a) one in Port Louis (Mauritius), and the other (b) in Beira (Mozambique).

a)  Afritex Fishing Ltd (Mauritius)
Longline fishing operation based in Port Louis (Mauritius), with commercial quay-side packing and processing facility, and owned fleet of vessels. Fishing in waters of Mauritius, the primary focus is fresh tuna (mainly YFT) and swordfish. The product is distributed fresh by airfreight, as well as processed seafood for retail ready lines, such as tuna, swordfish, dorado and other associated by-catch.

b)  Pescamoz
Longline fishing company based in the port of Beira (Mozambique). It comprises a processing facility and self-owned fleet of longline vessels. Primary focus is on the export of fresh tuna and swordfish, as well as processing a range of retail lines from tuna, swordfish, and dorado.

Afritex is an investment holding company with strategic interests in African based fishing operations that markets seafood to a global base of customers. Through its subsidiary companies, Afritex operates two longline tuna and swordfish operations – (a) one in Port Louis (Mauritius), and the other (b) in Beira (Mozambique).

FIP at a Glance

29% 32% 39%
June 01, 2019
29% 32% 39%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jan 2020
Target End Date
Jun 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Key Traceability
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Tom Evans
Phone 
07584659898
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

The Indian Ocean Albacore Tuna Longline FIP aims to improve fishing practices for longline vessels operating in the Indian Ocean that land albacore and supply Bumble Bee Foods. Bumble Bee sources albacore tuna from these vessels through the Taiwanese-founded company FCF Fishery Company, Ltd. (FCF), who acts as a broker for the fishing vessels, with Bumble Bee exporting the product to North American markets. While the target stock is healthy and management is well-document and well-implemented, the fishery lacks explicit harvest control rules and harvest strategies, which are fundamental tools to limit the risk of overfishing. Additionally, the fishery lacks independent observers, electronic monitoring, and qualitative information about bycatch, making the fishery’s effects on the surrounding ecosystem difficult to assess.

The Indian Ocean Albacore Tuna Longline FIP aims to improve fishing practices for longline vessels operating in the Indian Ocean that land albacore and supply Bumble Bee Foods. Bumble Bee sources albacore tuna from these vessels through the Taiwanese-founded company FCF Fishery Company, Ltd. (FCF), who acts as a broker for the fishing vessels, with Bumble Bee exporting the product to North American markets.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Ocean Outcomes
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Daniel Suddaby
Organization Name 
Bumble Bee Foods, LLC
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Mike Kraft
Organization Name 
Fong Chun Fishery Company, Ltd.
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Fong Lee
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.
Expiration Date 
January 2020

Overview

This is an improvements project for swordfish and large pelagics caught on the high seas and subject to conservation and management measures of the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission.  The vessels in the FIP target swordfish and other billfishes.  By minimizing fishing impacts to all species interacting with the longline gear and sharing in the responsibility of fisheries management with good catch data and support for stronger regulations, the project's goals are billfish recovery and healthy shark, tuna and seabird populations in the Indian Ocean.

SYM-PAC International, Inc and Fong Hsiang are the hosts of this fishery improvement project (FIP) and Harvest Meats and Sprouts Farmer's Markets are FIP participants.  Science and secretariat are provided by the Sustainability Incubator.  The FIP participants include longline vessels Kha Yang 1, Kha Yang 3, Kha Yang 5, Kha Yang 7, Kha Yang 9, Kha Yang 35 and the Kha Yang 333, a refrigerated cargo vessel.

This is an improvements project for swordfish and large pelagics caught on the high seas and subject to conservation and management measures of the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission.  The vessels in the FIP target swordfish and other billfishes.  By minimizing fishing impacts to all species interacting with the longline gear and sharing in the responsibility of fisheries management with good catch data and support for stronger regulations, the project's goals are billfish recovery and healthy shark, tuna and seabird populations in the Indian Ocean.

FIP at a Glance

14% 46% 39%
August 01, 2018
14% 46% 39%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Feb 2020
Target End Date
Dec 2021

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
SYM-PAC International
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Jason Yabiku
Organization Name 
Fong Hsiang Enterprise Co Pte Ltd
Organization Type 
Industry
Enter the public contact information for the leader of the FIP. This information will be displayed on FisheryProgress.org for users who want to contact the FIP.

Overview

The Indian Ocean Tuna Longline Fishery aims to meet the rising global demand for tuna in a sustainable manner by assuring catches do not exceed sustainable levels, promoting the ecosystem based approach to fisheries management and strengthening policy and governance systems in the region. The fishery being assessed is Indian Ocean Longline Tuna, targeting albacore (Thunnus alalunga), bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) in the Indian Ocean using Malaysian flagged vessels.

Indian Ocean Tuna Longline Fishery goals:

  • Sustainable Fish Stocks – To ensure tuna and other primary species catches across the Indian Ocean do not exceed sustainable levels
  • Minimising Environmental Impacts – To promote the ecosystem based approach to fisheries management
  • Effective Management – To strengthen governance systems in the IOTC and Indian Tuna Longline fishery.

The Indian Ocean Tuna Longline Fishery aims to meet the rising global demand for tuna in a sustainable manner by assuring catches do not exceed sustainable levels, promoting the ecosystem based approach to fisheries management and strengthening policy and governance systems in the region. The fishery being assessed is Indian Ocean Longline Tuna, targeting albacore (Thunnus alalunga), bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) in the Indian Ocean using Malaysian flagged vessels.

FIP at a Glance

36% 25% 39%
December 01, 2018
36% 25% 39%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2019
Target End Date
Dec 2023

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Key Traceability
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Tom Evans
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Overview

What is a Prospective FIP?
Prospective FIPs intend to meet the requirements for active FIPs within one year. These projects are posted on FisheryProgress to help users identify opportunities to support developing FIPs and prevent the start of duplicate FIPs. Prospective FIPs are not yet demonstrating progress toward sustainability.

The red snapper fishery in the Gulf of Mexico (GM) and the Caribbean Sea consists of three species (Lutjanus campechanus, L. vivanus, L. buccanella), of which, the Northern red snapper, L. campechanus, represents approximately 89.0-90.0 % of catches (Mexicano-Cintora et al., 2007, Anderson et al., 2015). The species is considered one of the most commercially-important fish in the Gulf. Nowadays, it is ranked fifth in terms of fish species with the highest catches in Campeche (González-de la Rosa et al., 1994; Gobierno del Estado de Campeche, 2015), likewise, 36 species are associated with its capture, mostly from commercial interest (Carta Nacional Pesquera, 2018).

The catch of this resource in Mexico doesn’t fall under any specific regulations such as a fisheries management plan, reproductive closures, quotas or minimum catch sizes. This has influenced the decline of the populations and therefore, the availability of this resource. The species is currently in decline for the states of Tamaulipas, Veracruz, Campeche and Yucatan and at the maximum sustainable use level for Tabasco (Anderson et al., 2015; Carta Nacional Pesquera, 2018). Because of this, the development of Fishery Improvement Project, which involves the fishing sector, government, research groups and NGOs, is needed in order to establish standards for responsible fishing for this species.

The red snapper fishery in the Gulf of Mexico (GM) and the Caribbean Sea consists of three species (Lutjanus campechanus, L. vivanus, L. buccanella), of which, the Northern red snapper, L. campechanus, represents approximately 89.0-90.0 % of catches (Mexicano-Cintora et al., 2007, Anderson et al., 2015). The species is considered one of the most commercially-important fish in the Gulf.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Comunidad y Biodiversidad, A.C.
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
José Francisco Chávez Villegas
Phone 
999 9218247
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Expiration Date 
November 2019

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