Bottom Longline

Overview

The national-level Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP led by ADI will merge three site-level basic snapper-grouper FIPs (Aru, Makassar Strait, and Java Sea) and is aiming to develop solutions for snapper and grouper fishery management and other issues that can only be addressed effectively at the national level and thus will support the work of existing FIPs.

This FIP will be a comprehensive FIP and will address the objectives originally outlined in three basic FIPs as well as additional issues identified in the MSC Pre-Assessment produced by The Nature Conservancy to support the TNC Indonesia deepwater groundfish - dropline, longline, trap and gillnet FIP.   The ADI-led Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP is aligned and a complementary effort to the TNC-led snapper grouper FIP.

This FIP will focus on six snapper species (Lutjanus malabaricus, L. eryphtropterus, L. sebae, Pristipmoides multidens, P. typus and Pinjalo pinjalo) and 10 grouper species caught in Indonesian Waters (WPPs) using bottom longline, drop line, trap and gillnet.

 

The national-level Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP led by ADI will merge three site-level basic snapper-grouper FIPs (Aru, Makassar Strait, and Java Sea) and is aiming to develop solutions for snapper and grouper fishery management and other issues that can only be addressed effectively at the national level and thus will support the work of existing FIPs.

FIP at a Glance

32% 14% 54%
June 01, 2020
32% 14% 54%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Aug 2021
Target End Date
Jun 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Indonesian Demersal Association (ADI)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
M. Novi Saputra
Phone 
+62-31-99540949
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
13955

Overview

The fishery of the red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) is one of the most important in terms of the scale resource in the Gulf of Mexico (GM) region, being the fifth species of fish with greater extraction in Campeche (González-de la Rosa, Sánchez and Arreguín-Sánchez, 1994; Government of the State of Campeche, 2015).

During the decade of the 70s, the annual catch of red snapper in this same region was represented in 93% by L. campechanus, without indications of reduction of the population stock (Anderson et al. 2015). During the 80s, González-de la Rosa et al. (1994), Monroy-García, Garduño-Andrade and Espinosa (2002), as well as, Monroy-García, Arceo and Ríos (2004) stated that the red snapper resource was under-exploited and the fishery growing in the north from Yucatan, showing an increase in annual catches from 1,800.0 to 4,500.0 tonnes.

In Mexico, there was a historical maximum in the catch of red snapper during 1993. In the period 1986-1996, 4,956.0 t of the average annual catch was recorded and from 2000 to 2015 a decrease of 39.0% was observed with 2,996.0 t annual average according to the CNP (2018).

Despite the commercial importance of this resource, there are currently no biomass studies in the region. Monroy García et al. (2002) estimated that this indicator decreased from 32,957.0 t in 1984 to 16,877.0 in 1999, which is 51.0%, indicating that this population does not show signs of recovery. They also calculated a maximum sustainable yield (RMS) of 1,271.0 t / year. Recording a capture of 3,083.0 t in 1992, and an average of 1,384.0 t in the period 1984-1999, which exceeds the CMS and therefore there is a strong decrease, reporting that landings in the Gulf of Mexico (GM) declined from 71.0 to 80.0% by 2013 (Anderson et al., 2015).

Currently, in the Mexican states, the use of this resource does not present specific regulations such as a fishing management plan, reproductive closures, quotas or minimum catch sizes, which has influenced the decline in populations and therefore the availability of this resource, considering that it is currently deteriorating in the states of Tamaulipas, Veracruz, Campeche and Yucatan and at the level of maximum sustainable use in Tabasco (Anderson et al., 2015; CNP, 2018), the development of strategies for fishery management for this species, which involve the fisheries, government, academic and civil society organizations in order to establish standards for responsible fishing.

The fishery of the red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) is one of the most important in terms of the scale resource in the Gulf of Mexico (GM) region, being the fifth species of fish with greater extraction in Campeche (González-de la Rosa, Sánchez and Arreguín-Sánchez, 1994; Government of the State of Campeche, 2015).

FIP at a Glance

25% 46% 29%
November 01, 2019
32% 39% 29%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Sep 2021
Target End Date
Dec 2024

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Comunidad y Biodiversidad, A.C.
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Alesa Flores
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
12449

Overview

The Indonesian groundfish fishery comprise 4 fishing methods, drop-line and long-line, trap and gill-net. There are an estimated  10,185 licensed vessels  operating throughout the 11 WWPP zones (June, 2020). These vessels operate across a broad range (i.e. from within the 4-nautical mile baseline the EEZ boundary, and in depths of 50 to 500 m. The fisheries are within FAO Regions 57 (the Eastern Indian Ocean) and 71 (the Western and Central Pacific Ocean).The geographical range is defined as the waters within the meridians of longitude 110° East and 140° West, and 12° South, 4° North. To the North this fishery borders the EEZs of Malaysia and Philippines, to the East, the EEZs of Papua New Guinea and East Timor, and Australia to the South.

Long-line comprises short lines carrying hooks that are attached to a longer main line at regular intervals (FAO). Longlines are laid on the bottom at depths of 50 to 150 m, with the help of small anchors or weights, and marked at the surface with flagged buoys. The lines deployed in the groundfish fishery are estimated to be between 200 to 500 hooks per set, depending on vessels size (Mous, pers com, September 2017). The bottom long-liners fish on the shelf area as well as on the top of the slopes that drop into deeper waters. Bottom long line fishing for snappers and co-occurring species is done with vessels ranging from smaller than 5 GT up to around 100 GT in Indonesian waters.

Drop-lining comprises a main line with one to 10 hooks and a weight (Mous, ibid.), held vertically in the water by hand (handline) or by manual reel. Several droplines may be operated by one fishermen or one vessel (FAO). Drop line fishers target snappers and other demersal species around structures and slopes throughout Indonesia from depths of around 30 to 50 meters on continental shelf areas, to deep slopes and seamounts 50 to 500 meters deep. Drop liners deployed in this fishery range in size from simple canoes to vessels more than 30 GT.

Trap and Gill-net fishing for snappers, groupers, emperors and co-occurring species is less widespread than the use of long line and drop line and is often done in a mixed fishery where hook and line methods are used simultaneously with the traps or gillnets. Commonly used deep water traps for snappers and groupers are made of metal frames and wiring, with the trap cages around 1.5 meters long and wide and about 0.5 to 1 meter high. Traps are usually baited and positioned near structures which are known aggregation sites for target species. Bottom gillnets are set horizontally near structures on continental shelf areas but also vertically along steep slopes and reef drop-offs, with one end tied off to rocks or coral heads on reef tops and the other end weighted and dropped several hundred meters deep, by stretching the net away from the reef over deep water before dropping it.

The size of vessels in this fishery include a broad range of vessels, including < 5 GT to > 30 GT. Fishers are licensed by permit system with MMAF responsible for licensing vessels > 30 GT, Dinas Perikanan Province, for vessels between 5 to 30 GT, and Dinas districts, for all vessels under 5 GT. Vessels are licensed annually, according to broad definitions of fishing method. However, the method and target species for vessels less than 5 GT may change according to availability of the target species. Larger vessels are known to move long distances and into different jurisdictional area, in which case, they will be required to hold several licenses. Vessels over 30 GT are only allowed to hold two concurrent WPP licenses. 

The stock assessment programme comprises a number of proxy assessments of the multi-species deepwater dropline and longline fisheries targeting snappers, groupers, emperors, and grunters, located at depths ranging from 50 to 500 metres. These proxy assessments are identified as reasonable proxies of stock biomass for the Point of Recruitment Impairment (PRI) and/or Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). There are  395 individual Units of Assessment (UoA), representing 90% of the total species numbers in the dropline fishery and 90% in the longline fishery. The expectation is that the 396 UoAs, will be separated between dropline-caught species by. management area, with each area representing single stocks. Many, of these species occur in both fisheries and in each management area.

There is presently no harvest strategy applied to these fisheries by the management authority, the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF).

The following FIP development priorities have been identified:

MSC Principle 1

Using a suite of proxies, development of agreed Performance Indicators and Reference Points to define stock status based on existing data sets (e.g. fishery-independent surveys)

Provide a sufficiently robust estimate of the removals from each stock by Indonesian fisheries other than the sub-fisheries under assessment 

Development of a harvest strategy which is responsive to the state of the stock and the elements of the harvest strategy work together towards achieving the stock management objectives of each target species fluctuating around a level consistent with MSY. 

MSC Principle 2

Provide a comprehensive table on other species catches, taken by each sub-fishery, and relating these numbers to the total catch in each fishery. This requires some elaboration of the data collection system for each of the groundfish fisheries in each WPP . Once collected, the assessment will need to review species caught, their status and vulnerability if between 2-5% of the total catch), and whether the UoA fishery is likely to impact on these stocks. From information gathered to date, this would appear to be quite unlikely.

Review whether ot not the fishery requires a shark finning strategy. Sharks caught represent less than 1% of the total catch of all species.

Review the impact of lost gears on marine habitats.

Implement a policy of non-discarding of waste, or any other synthetic or semi-synthetic organic compoundsfrom fishing vessels.

MSC Principle 3

Implement a fishery specific management plan that identifies short and long-term objectives, which are consistent with achieving the outcomes expressed by MSC’s Principles 1 (stock assessment, harvest strategies) and 2 (ecosystem management). 

Develop a comprehensive decision-making system is in place into the WPP consultative process that includes:

Develop and apply of a compliance strategy for the deepwater snapper and grouper sub-fisheries. 

Ensure that there is a fisheries specific management performance review process in place which is subject to internal and occasional external review.

 

FIP at a Glance

32% 14% 54%
July 01, 2019
36% 18% 46%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
B Good Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jul 2021
Target End Date
Jun 2024
Additional Impacts:
Traceability

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
The Nature Conservancy – Indonesia Fisheries Conservation Program
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Peter Mous
Email 
Phone 
61742042060
Organization Name 
Poseidon ARM PL
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Richard Banks
Phone 
61742042060
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
8201

Overview

The MSC certificate for this fishery was voluntarily suspended by certificate holders in light of recently renewed concerns about stock health resulting from changes in the ecosystem. The Groundfish Enterprise Allocation Council (GEAC), an industry association for offshore fishery companies in Canada, has subsequently initiated a Fishery Improvement Project (FIP) that will be supported by the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP). This FIP aims to complete an action plan that includes continued compliance with, and reporting on, all conditions associated with the suspended MSC certification and will serve to guide the fishery back to MSC certification as soon as possible. The FIP action plan will include improving the stock assessment model, gaining insight into the ecosystem drivers and exploring the role of discrete components in supporting the overall stock complex.

The MSC certificate for this fishery was voluntarily suspended by certificate holders in light of recently renewed concerns about stock health resulting from changes in the ecosystem.

FIP at a Glance

7% 11% 82%
May 01, 2017
7% 29% 64%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Aug 2021
Target End Date
Apr 2023

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Atlantic Groundfish Council
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Kris Vascotto
Phone 
(902) 526-4582
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
7465

Overview

Reason for Inactivity 
This FIP merged with the comprehensive FIP, Indonesia snapper and grouper - bottom longline, dropline, trap, and gillnet (ADI)

The Indonesia Makassar Strait snapper and grouper FIP is an industry-led FIP, which was initiated based on the interest of five seafood processors in Makassar in 2015. Sustainable Fisheries Partnership provides technical assistance and has facilitated meetings during FIP development and implementation.

The target species of this FIP are Lutjanus malabaricusLutjanus sebae, and Epinephelus malabaricus. Fishing gears used are dropline and bottom long line.

This FIP is a small-scale fishery, in which the size of fishing boats ranges from 4 to 7 m long, and are powered by 5 to 24 HP/PK outboard engines. Fishers go out on a daily basis, and will also go on longer fishing trips, sometimes for 10 to 14 days.

The fishing ground covers the waters of Makassar Strait and Flores Sea (in Fishery Management Area –713) on the shallow reefs to the depth of over 100 m. The fishing operation for these fisheries falls under the Provincial Fisheries Office of South Sulawesi.

 

The Indonesia Makassar Strait snapper and grouper FIP is an industry-led FIP, which was initiated based on the interest of five seafood processors in Makassar in 2015. Sustainable Fisheries Partnership provides technical assistance and has facilitated meetings during FIP development and implementation.

The target species of this FIP are Lutjanus malabaricusLutjanus sebae, and Epinephelus malabaricus. Fishing gears used are dropline and bottom long line.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
PT. Kemilau Bintang Timur
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Agus Saputra
Phone 
+6281241559981
Organization Name 
CV. Inti Makmur Makassar
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Irma Maladan
Phone 
+6285714239270
Organization Name 
PT. Sukses Hasil Alam NusaIndo (SHANINDO)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Haryono Soegiono
Phone 
+62 853-9508-0878
Organization Name 
PT. Trans Anugrah Mulia
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
David Gani
Phone 
+62 813-5453-5314
Organization Name 
PT. Prima Bahari
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Kalma
Phone 
+62 853-4272-9113
Organization Name 
PT. Kelola Mina Laut - KML
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Siswo Setiawan
Phone 
+62 878-4102-6969
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
7143

Overview

Reason for Inactivity 
This FIP merged with the comprehensive FIP, Indonesia snapper and grouper - bottom longline, dropline, trap, and gillnet (ADI)

The Aru and Arafura Seas snapper, grouper, and demersal species FIP was established in May 2012. The FIP involves 46 bottom longline vessels. Some additional context and history of this FIP's efforts can be viewed the FIP's website, as well as FishSource.

The FIP supports and contributes to the development, improvement, traceability and sustainability of the snapper-grouper and demersal fisheries industry in Indonesia by: promoting traceability, improving the availability of accurate data on catches retained and bycatch, and collaborating with other institutions working on the fisheries issues in the country. This includes working together to improve the management and policy for sustainable fisheries.

Background

The distribution of snapper (kakap merah) and grouper (kerapu) in Indonesia covers the vast area of the archipelago, with Aru and the Arafura Seas being the major fishing grounds for snapper and deeper water grouper species. Data from the Indonesian Capture Fisheries Statistics show that in 2007, kakapmerah from these waters contributed to more than 30% of the total catch, with 35,112 metric tonnes being landed (MMAF 2009). The total landing of snapper in Indonesia was 116,994 metric tonnes in 2007. The other important fishing grounds for snapper are in the Karimata Strait, the Natuna Sea, and the South China Sea, which contributed 13.9% of the total catch, followed by Tolo Bay and the Banda Sea (11.8%), Java Sea (10.5%) and the Makassar Strait, Bone Bay, the Flores Sea and the Bali Sea (8.1%).

Snappers, grouper, and other demersal are the target fisheries for traditional, small-scale, and semi-industrial fisheries. The traditional fishing trips normal last one day, while the small-scale to semi-industrial fishing trips can last for days to weeks, and target other demersal species.

 

The Aru and Arafura Seas snapper, grouper, and demersal species FIP was established in May 2012. The FIP involves 46 bottom longline vessels. Some additional context and history of this FIP's efforts can be viewed the FIP's website, as well as FishSource.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
PT Inti Lautan Fajar Abadi
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Geerry Richard Kosasih
Phone 
+62 812 171 799 66
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
4251

Overview

The Canada Atlantic cod (2J3KL) longline, trawl, gillnet and hook & line FIP is led by the Atlantic Groundfish Council (AGC) and the Association of Seafood Producers (ASP), with major retail funding from Marks & Spencer, Young's Seafood, Sysco France and High Liner Foods; and with in-kind support from Sustainable Fisheries Fund and Atlantic Canadian institutions including Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Memorial University, Dalhousie University and Ocean Tracking Network.

The FIP was launched in April 2015 with actions well underway on a number of fronts, assisted by a formal MSC Pre-Assessment that scopes out the challenges to be addressed in order to receive MSC certification. A DFO 2J3KL Cod Recovery Working Group was created in 2012 and includes representatives of all Stakeholders; the development of draft harvest control rules (HCR) is well advanced. An Integrated Fishery Management Plan (IFMP) is under development and should be completed in 2017. Much of the habitat and ecosystem information has already been assembled by FIP Participants, in part as evidence for the MSC certification of other directed fisheries in the same area (2J3KLNO). Coral and sponge concentrations have been identified using DFO’s research vessel surveys and formal peer-review processes.

FIP members continue to advocate a ‘go slow’ precautionary approach to setting catch limits for this recovering stock.  Examples of our public position on this issue can be seen in recent media communications, (see ‘Background on Atlantic Groundfish Council Northern Cod Position_Mar 2019’ under the Additional Supporting Documentation link in the Detail Tab).

The Canada Atlantic cod (2J3KL) longline, trawl, gillnet and hook & line FIP is led by the Atlantic Groundfish Council (AGC) and the Association of Seafood Producers (ASP), with major retail funding from Marks & Spencer, Young's Seafood, Sysco France and High Liner Foods; and with in-kind support from Sustainable Fisheries Fund and Atlantic Canadian institutions including Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Memorial University, Dalhousie University and Ocean Tracking Network.

FIP at a Glance

7% 4% 89%
February 01, 2015
11% 32% 57%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Dec 2021
Target End Date
Dec 2025
Additional Impacts:
Roundtable

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Association of Seafood Producers
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Derek Butler
Phone 
(709) 726-3730
Organization Name 
Atlantic Groundfish Council
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Kris Vascotto
Phone 
(902) 526-4582
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
3156

Overview

 Northern cod, one of the world’s largest and most iconic fisheries, was instrumental in the development of the New World by Europeans in Canada. Excessive fishing combined with ecosystem change led to the collapse of cod in the 1990s, resulted in the largest lay-off in North America with 30,000 lost jobs in Newfoundland and Labrador. The socio-cultural fabric of the province was shaped by this 500 year old fishery, the loss of livelihood resulted in the alteration of a people’s way of life. From the species perspective the decline and subsequent collapse of the Northern cod stock represents one of the world’s worst ecological disasters.

Over the past 25 years, the only northern cod pulled from our waters has been caught by other directed fisheries as bycatch; by an in-shore cod stewardship fishery; by scientific fishing sets and in recreational fishing activity. However, there is reason for optimism around the future of a commercial fishery. Recent biomass indicators show significant improvement in stock biomass– though still well below biomass limit for direct commercial fishing–and positive stock indicators, such as age profile. Environmental conditions are also generally positive for the stock.

LAUNCHING THE NORTHERN COD FISHERY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

In April 2015, WWF-Canada embarked on a fishery improvement project (FIP) to bring back Newfoundland and Labrador’s northern cod stock, signing a landmark agreement with the largest private-sector union in the province, the Fish, Food and Allied Workers (FFAW) Union. Formalizing our partnership with the FFAW, which represents harvesters, was the first major step in launching a five-year initiative to improve the sustainability of the only existing northern cod fishery—a small-scale, stewardship fishery with around 9,600  metric tonnes of annual landings—so that it may enter into the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certification process. WWF-Canada and the FFAW also secured support for the FIP from the Seafood Producers of Newfoundland and Labrador, Fogo Island Co-op and the NL- Groundfish Industry Development Council.

The FIP process formally commenced in November 2015 with a MSC pre-assessment that identified the issues that needed to be addressed to improve the sustainability of the stock. A stakeholder meeting that included participants from all sectors of the industry was held in September 2016 to help develop a FIP action plan to tackle the problems in the fishery. The Action plan was launched publicly in December 2016 that includes the necessary actions to address the issues of concerns in the fishery, responsible parties and timelines. In 2017 we shall commence the implementation of the activities identified in the Action Plan to address the issues and concerns that were identified in the pre-assessment. Our goal is to move the current fishery towards a sustainable viable full scale commercial fishery that will benefit the people and communities that depend on it to thrive.

FIPプロフィールレポート

 Northern cod, one of the world’s largest and most iconic fisheries, was instrumental in the development of the New World by Europeans in Canada. Excessive fishing combined with ecosystem change led to the collapse of cod in the 1990s, resulted in the largest lay-off in North America with 30,000 lost jobs in Newfoundland and Labrador. The socio-cultural fabric of the province was shaped by this 500 year old fishery, the loss of livelihood resulted in the alteration of a people’s way of life.

FIP at a Glance

7% 7% 86%
December 01, 2016
7% 14% 79%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Feb 2021
Target End Date
Dec 2025
Additional Impacts:
EcosystemRoundtable

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Fish, Food and Allied Workers Union/UNIFOR
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Dwan Street
Phone 
7095767276
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
2626

Overview

Red grouper and black grouper are two of the main target species for the mixed demersal fishery in the Bank of Campeche, located to the north of the Yucatan Peninsula in the Gulf of Mexico.  This seasonal fishery is of high social importance, given that more than 10 thousand families depend on it for their livelihood. 

Currently, the red grouper stock is below its limit reference point, and there is much to do to improve management strategies to effectively regulate fishing effort and catch levels so that the species may recover.  This project aims at achieving a certifiable status against the MSC standard by collaborating with governmental and private stakeholders to develop and implement a consistent recovery strategy (complete with effective data collection, monitoring and control), and an adequate research plan to close information gaps on the fishery and its interaction with other ecosystem components.

For more information on improvement activities, please visit:  CeDePesca's Mexican Grouper FIP Public report (updated quaterly).

Red grouper and black grouper are two of the main target species for the mixed demersal fishery in the Bank of Campeche, located to the north of the Yucatan Peninsula in the Gulf of Mexico.  This seasonal fishery is of high social importance, given that more than 10 thousand families depend on it for their livelihood. 

FIP at a Glance

25% 46% 29%
April 01, 2014
32% 54% 14%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
A Advanced Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jun 2021
Target End Date
Mar 2021
Additional Impacts:
Roundtable

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
CeDePesca
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Minerva Alonso
Organization Name 
Sea Delight
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Stephen Fisher
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
338
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