Dropline

Overview

This FIP covers the Atlantic Ocean stocks of bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and yellowfin (T. albacares) tunas caught in the Grenada Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) by vessels supplying the Southern Fishermen Association (SFA) and using pelagic longline, troll and dropline fishing gear. With the majority of the Grenada EEZ in deep oceanic water, large pelagics such as tuna dominate fisheries landings. For the purpose of this FIP, two key fisheries are considered to make up the Grenada tuna fleet: a pelagic longline and troll fishery that targets free schools of tuna and a troll and dropline fishery that targets large pelagics around anchored Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs). The longline fleet consists of about 200 vessels, the majority of which make single-day trips, while approximately 120 fishers are active in the FAD fishery. The fishery falls under the jurisdiction of the Regional Fisheries Management Organisation (RFMO) ICCAT. Within the EEZ, the development and management of marine resources fall under the jurisdiction of the Grenada Fisheries Division, a division of the Ministry of Climate Resilience, the Environment, Forestry, Fisheries, Disaster Management and Information.

This FIP covers the Atlantic Ocean stocks of bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and yellowfin (T. albacares) tunas caught in the Grenada Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) by vessels supplying the Southern Fishermen Association (SFA) and using pelagic longline, troll and dropline fishing gear. With the majority of the Grenada EEZ in deep oceanic water, large pelagics such as tuna dominate fisheries landings.

FIP at a Glance

64% 14% 21%
November 01, 2020
64% 14% 21%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
Not yet available
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Nov 2021
Target End Date
Dec 2023

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
One Skip Development
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Keith Flett
Organization Name 
Seven Seas Fisheries Consulting Ltd.
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Chrissie Sieben
Phone 
00447767246997
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
14317

Overview

The national-level Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP led by ADI will merge three site-level basic snapper-grouper FIPs (Aru, Makassar Strait, and Java Sea) and is aiming to develop solutions for snapper and grouper fishery management and other issues that can only be addressed effectively at the national level and thus will support the work of existing FIPs.

This FIP will be a comprehensive FIP and will address the objectives originally outlined in three basic FIPs as well as additional issues identified in the MSC Pre-Assessment produced by The Nature Conservancy to support the TNC Indonesia deepwater groundfish - dropline, longline, trap and gillnet FIP.   The ADI-led Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP is aligned and a complementary effort to the TNC-led snapper grouper FIP.

This FIP will focus on six snapper species (Lutjanus malabaricus, L. eryphtropterus, L. sebae, Pristipmoides multidens, P. typus and Pinjalo pinjalo) and 10 grouper species caught in Indonesian Waters (WPPs) using bottom longline, drop line, trap and gillnet.

 

The national-level Indonesia Snapper Grouper FIP led by ADI will merge three site-level basic snapper-grouper FIPs (Aru, Makassar Strait, and Java Sea) and is aiming to develop solutions for snapper and grouper fishery management and other issues that can only be addressed effectively at the national level and thus will support the work of existing FIPs.

FIP at a Glance

32% 14% 54%
June 01, 2020
32% 14% 54%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
C Some Recent Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Aug 2021
Target End Date
Jun 2025

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
Indonesian Demersal Association (ADI)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
M. Novi Saputra
Phone 
+62-31-99540949
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
13955

Overview

Reason for Inactivity 
This FIP merged with the comprehensive FIP, Indonesia snapper and grouper - bottom longline, dropline, trap, and gillnet (ADI)

The target for this FIP is snapper & grouper in Java Sea that is landed in Brondong Archipelagic Fishing Port, Lamongan, East Java. Mostly, the gear used by fishers is dropline and handline. The fishers usually go out on fishing trips for about 4 to 9 days, with vessels less than 30 GT.

The target for this FIP is snapper & grouper in Java Sea that is landed in Brondong Archipelagic Fishing Port, Lamongan, East Java. Mostly, the gear used by fishers is dropline and handline. The fishers usually go out on fishing trips for about 4 to 9 days, with vessels less than 30 GT.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
PT Alam Jaya Seafood
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Dedi Sukanto
Organization Name 
PT Bahari Biru Nusantara
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Hadi Wijaja
Email 
Organization Name 
PT Inti Lautan Fajar Abadi
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Geerry Kosasih
Organization Name 
PT Kelola Mina Laut
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Windra H. Putra
Organization Name 
PT Kemilau Bintang Timur
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Yudo Broto
Organization Name 
PT Varia Niaga Nusantara
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Hariono Lowis
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
9276

Overview

The Indonesian groundfish fishery comprise 4 fishing methods, drop-line and long-line, trap and gill-net. There are an estimated  10,185 licensed vessels  operating throughout the 11 WWPP zones (June, 2020). These vessels operate across a broad range (i.e. from within the 4-nautical mile baseline the EEZ boundary, and in depths of 50 to 500 m. The fisheries are within FAO Regions 57 (the Eastern Indian Ocean) and 71 (the Western and Central Pacific Ocean).The geographical range is defined as the waters within the meridians of longitude 110° East and 140° West, and 12° South, 4° North. To the North this fishery borders the EEZs of Malaysia and Philippines, to the East, the EEZs of Papua New Guinea and East Timor, and Australia to the South.

Long-line comprises short lines carrying hooks that are attached to a longer main line at regular intervals (FAO). Longlines are laid on the bottom at depths of 50 to 150 m, with the help of small anchors or weights, and marked at the surface with flagged buoys. The lines deployed in the groundfish fishery are estimated to be between 200 to 500 hooks per set, depending on vessels size (Mous, pers com, September 2017). The bottom long-liners fish on the shelf area as well as on the top of the slopes that drop into deeper waters. Bottom long line fishing for snappers and co-occurring species is done with vessels ranging from smaller than 5 GT up to around 100 GT in Indonesian waters.

Drop-lining comprises a main line with one to 10 hooks and a weight (Mous, ibid.), held vertically in the water by hand (handline) or by manual reel. Several droplines may be operated by one fishermen or one vessel (FAO). Drop line fishers target snappers and other demersal species around structures and slopes throughout Indonesia from depths of around 30 to 50 meters on continental shelf areas, to deep slopes and seamounts 50 to 500 meters deep. Drop liners deployed in this fishery range in size from simple canoes to vessels more than 30 GT.

Trap and Gill-net fishing for snappers, groupers, emperors and co-occurring species is less widespread than the use of long line and drop line and is often done in a mixed fishery where hook and line methods are used simultaneously with the traps or gillnets. Commonly used deep water traps for snappers and groupers are made of metal frames and wiring, with the trap cages around 1.5 meters long and wide and about 0.5 to 1 meter high. Traps are usually baited and positioned near structures which are known aggregation sites for target species. Bottom gillnets are set horizontally near structures on continental shelf areas but also vertically along steep slopes and reef drop-offs, with one end tied off to rocks or coral heads on reef tops and the other end weighted and dropped several hundred meters deep, by stretching the net away from the reef over deep water before dropping it.

The size of vessels in this fishery include a broad range of vessels, including < 5 GT to > 30 GT. Fishers are licensed by permit system with MMAF responsible for licensing vessels > 30 GT, Dinas Perikanan Province, for vessels between 5 to 30 GT, and Dinas districts, for all vessels under 5 GT. Vessels are licensed annually, according to broad definitions of fishing method. However, the method and target species for vessels less than 5 GT may change according to availability of the target species. Larger vessels are known to move long distances and into different jurisdictional area, in which case, they will be required to hold several licenses. Vessels over 30 GT are only allowed to hold two concurrent WPP licenses. 

The stock assessment programme comprises a number of proxy assessments of the multi-species deepwater dropline and longline fisheries targeting snappers, groupers, emperors, and grunters, located at depths ranging from 50 to 500 metres. These proxy assessments are identified as reasonable proxies of stock biomass for the Point of Recruitment Impairment (PRI) and/or Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). There are  395 individual Units of Assessment (UoA), representing 90% of the total species numbers in the dropline fishery and 90% in the longline fishery. The expectation is that the 396 UoAs, will be separated between dropline-caught species by. management area, with each area representing single stocks. Many, of these species occur in both fisheries and in each management area.

There is presently no harvest strategy applied to these fisheries by the management authority, the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF).

The following FIP development priorities have been identified:

MSC Principle 1

Using a suite of proxies, development of agreed Performance Indicators and Reference Points to define stock status based on existing data sets (e.g. fishery-independent surveys)

Provide a sufficiently robust estimate of the removals from each stock by Indonesian fisheries other than the sub-fisheries under assessment 

Development of a harvest strategy which is responsive to the state of the stock and the elements of the harvest strategy work together towards achieving the stock management objectives of each target species fluctuating around a level consistent with MSY. 

MSC Principle 2

Provide a comprehensive table on other species catches, taken by each sub-fishery, and relating these numbers to the total catch in each fishery. This requires some elaboration of the data collection system for each of the groundfish fisheries in each WPP . Once collected, the assessment will need to review species caught, their status and vulnerability if between 2-5% of the total catch), and whether the UoA fishery is likely to impact on these stocks. From information gathered to date, this would appear to be quite unlikely.

Review whether ot not the fishery requires a shark finning strategy. Sharks caught represent less than 1% of the total catch of all species.

Review the impact of lost gears on marine habitats.

Implement a policy of non-discarding of waste, or any other synthetic or semi-synthetic organic compoundsfrom fishing vessels.

MSC Principle 3

Implement a fishery specific management plan that identifies short and long-term objectives, which are consistent with achieving the outcomes expressed by MSC’s Principles 1 (stock assessment, harvest strategies) and 2 (ecosystem management). 

Develop a comprehensive decision-making system is in place into the WPP consultative process that includes:

Develop and apply of a compliance strategy for the deepwater snapper and grouper sub-fisheries. 

Ensure that there is a fisheries specific management performance review process in place which is subject to internal and occasional external review.

 

FIP at a Glance

32% 14% 54%
July 01, 2019
36% 18% 46%
Progress Rating

A - Advanced Progress
Reserved for comprehensive FIPs that have a Stage 4 or 5 result within the past 12 months.

B - Good Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 in more than 12 months AND Stage 3 activity in the last year; OR a basic FIP that has achieved Stage 4 or 5 achievements within the past 12 months.

C - Some Recent Progress
A FIP that has achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 12 (but less than 24) months but has not generated a Stage 3 result within the past 12 months OR a FIP younger than a year that has never achieved a Stage 4 or 5 result but has completed a Stage 3 activity.

D - Some Past Progress
A FIP for which the most recent publicly reported Stage 4 or 5 result is more than 24 (but less than 30) months.

E - Negligible Progress
A FIP older than a year that has not reported a Stage 4 or 5 result in more than 30 month (but less than 36) months; OR a FIP younger than 1 year that has not reported a Stage 3 activity.

The ratings are currently derived by SFP from publicly available data on FIP websites, including FisheryProgress.org, and are determined using the following methodology: View PDF
B Good Progress
Actions Complete
  • Complete
  • Incomplete
Next Update Due FisheryProgress requires a FIP to provide update reports every six months, and two missed reports will render the FIP inactive. If a report is overdue, this date will appear red.
Jul 2021
Target End Date
Jun 2024
Additional Impacts:
Traceability

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
The Nature Conservancy – Indonesia Fisheries Conservation Program
Organization Type 
NGO
Primary Contact 
Peter Mous
Email 
Phone 
61742042060
Organization Name 
Poseidon ARM PL
Organization Type 
Consultant
Primary Contact 
Richard Banks
Phone 
61742042060
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
8201

Overview

Reason for Inactivity 
This FIP merged with the comprehensive FIP, Indonesia snapper and grouper - bottom longline, dropline, trap, and gillnet (ADI)

The Indonesia Makassar Strait snapper and grouper FIP is an industry-led FIP, which was initiated based on the interest of five seafood processors in Makassar in 2015. Sustainable Fisheries Partnership provides technical assistance and has facilitated meetings during FIP development and implementation.

The target species of this FIP are Lutjanus malabaricusLutjanus sebae, and Epinephelus malabaricus. Fishing gears used are dropline and bottom long line.

This FIP is a small-scale fishery, in which the size of fishing boats ranges from 4 to 7 m long, and are powered by 5 to 24 HP/PK outboard engines. Fishers go out on a daily basis, and will also go on longer fishing trips, sometimes for 10 to 14 days.

The fishing ground covers the waters of Makassar Strait and Flores Sea (in Fishery Management Area –713) on the shallow reefs to the depth of over 100 m. The fishing operation for these fisheries falls under the Provincial Fisheries Office of South Sulawesi.

 

The Indonesia Makassar Strait snapper and grouper FIP is an industry-led FIP, which was initiated based on the interest of five seafood processors in Makassar in 2015. Sustainable Fisheries Partnership provides technical assistance and has facilitated meetings during FIP development and implementation.

The target species of this FIP are Lutjanus malabaricusLutjanus sebae, and Epinephelus malabaricus. Fishing gears used are dropline and bottom long line.

FIP Leads

Organization Name 
PT. Kemilau Bintang Timur
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Agus Saputra
Phone 
+6281241559981
Organization Name 
CV. Inti Makmur Makassar
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Irma Maladan
Phone 
+6285714239270
Organization Name 
PT. Sukses Hasil Alam NusaIndo (SHANINDO)
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Haryono Soegiono
Phone 
+62 853-9508-0878
Organization Name 
PT. Trans Anugrah Mulia
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
David Gani
Phone 
+62 813-5453-5314
Organization Name 
PT. Prima Bahari
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Kalma
Phone 
+62 853-4272-9113
Organization Name 
PT. Kelola Mina Laut - KML
Organization Type 
Industry
Primary Contact 
Siswo Setiawan
Phone 
+62 878-4102-6969
FIP Identification Number The FIP Identification Number is automatically generated by FisheryProgress when a FIP profile is created. While the number itself is not meaningful, they are used by NGOs, academia, and industry to refer to FIPs in a consistent way.
7143
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